By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more

Member postings for brokenenglish

Here is a list of all the postings brokenenglish has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: P.A.W. 1.49 plain bearing - can't adjust compression
13/12/2017 10:49:30

Martin, I (more than) agree entirely!

To enjoy engines, you have to love playing with them and "getting it right".

Those who look upon engines as being "smelly" or "dirty/oily" and a chore to operate, obviously have a right to their opinions, but they'd really be better off with knitting, or goldfish, or electric flight, or some similar pastime...devil

12/12/2017 21:02:50
Posted by Denis Watkins on 12/12/2017 20:31:54:

Copy your http title

Click on the globe on the middle second row

And paste it into the http line

Walla

**LINK**

Thanks Denis, I'll note that!

12/12/2017 20:22:27

OK, here's a video showing the freeing up of a gummed up PAW 149, including knocking the contra-piston back using the technique that I described. I didn't post it before because this engine has a muffler and an RC carb. but the basic freeing up and getting the thing running are the same.

Tom, who asked the question at the beginning, may get some inspiration from this. It does show the knocking back of the contra-piston in a gummed up engine.

I'm amazed that someone mentioned an electric starter. An electric starter is totally out of context, it doesn't offer any advantage whatsoever to free a gummed up engine!

Anyway, here's a link to my PAW 149. Sorry, I don't know how to show the video here.

http://youtu.be/S4c9JqfufUE
 
 

Edited By brokenenglish on 12/12/2017 20:23:51

Edited By brokenenglish on 12/12/2017 20:24:44

12/12/2017 17:16:33
Posted by Jon Harper - Laser Engines on 12/12/2017 10:26:49:

I agree with ED on this one. The shock loads on the innards of the engine will be extreme. Better to take it to bits than risk damage.

Jon and ED, that just isn't true!

Note that I emphasised "Make sure you can turn the engine over gently".

I must have used that procedure dozens of times in the last 50 or 60 years, and I've never damaged anything!

For me, the problem with the advice that many people offer is that anyone asking for advice will be inexperienced and possibly a "beginner". IMO, to advise delicate disassembly and abrading operations is irresponsible. It's far better for an inexperienced person to avoid disassembly No damage can occur using my method providing you go about it sensibly and check that the engine turns over OK, which is clearly stated!
Like I said, I've been doing exactly that since the fifties, and I've never broken anything.

Another valid point is that, in this case, we're dealing with an engine that has already been run, so it probably runs OK, it's just that the C/P is gummed up with congealed residue... That's no great issue and, for me, it certainly doesn't justify disassembling anything!

12/12/2017 09:00:18

Tom, several people have asked this question on my youtube channel. Each time, I've replied by the text below and, in every case, they came back saying "Thanks, it worked", so you may like to read and/or try the following:

First method (if it’s only moderately stuck):

-Mount the engine and install a propeller,

-Unscrew the compression screw a lot, you can even remove it,

-Put plenty of fuel in the cylinder (huge prime),

-Make sure you can turn the engine over gently (important!),

-Then give the propeller a good whack. Overcompressed combustion will often knock the contra piston back.

If this doesn’t work, then you need to unstick the contra piston any way you can...

The following has worked for me many times.

-Mount the engine and install a propeller,

-Gently turn the compression screw down, say half a turn, to increase compression. This must have « unstuck » the contra piston. When you’re sure you’ve actually moved the contra piston, then proceed as above, i.e.

-Unscrew the compression screw a lot,

-Put plenty of fuel in the cylinder,

-Make sure you can turn the engine over gently,

-Then give the propeller a good whack.

The important thing about the second method is that you start by forcing the contra piston to move, so you know it’s no longer « stuck ». You have also increased compression slightly, so there will be more force to knock the contra piston back. You won’t do any damage providing you unscrew the compression screw before turning the engine over, i.e. the contra piston will move before you bend a con-rod!

This method has always worked for me.

If it doesn’t work, then I would try serious heating (oven), followed by the above procedure.

If all that fails, you’ll have to disassemble... but I repeat, the above has always worked for me.

Thread: Nitro Engine Starter
07/12/2017 17:26:11
Posted by cymaz on 07/12/2017 17:11:10:

Glow engines...aka straight fuel engines for those that run 0% nitro ...devil

Respectfully Cymaz, I hope you're joking...

You mean that the name for any given engine depends on the fuel that you happen to be using today...

A glow engine doesn't cease to be a glow simply because you're using x% nitro!

At the outset, it was an "alternative culture" term, invented by marketing to stimulate car racing kids.
Followed by the fact that some people have a natural tendency to easily pick up "trendy" language.
Personally, I find that rather poor culturally, but we're all the way we are...

07/12/2017 07:36:50

Yeah Percy, the "nitro" nonsense is a marketing term invented by the model car people, to make i.c. engines sound exciting and even a little "daring"!

As an old engine lover (in every sense), I'm relieved to find that I'm not the only person offended!

Shame that ridiculous marketing is destroying culture.

Thread: Thread sizes for Amco .87
07/12/2017 07:09:07
Posted by onetenor on 06/12/2017 21:36:10:
Posted by brokenenglish on 06/12/2017 18:14:48:

Sorry John, I'll go against your instructions and comment anyway!

I'm not an engineer or even a doctor, but I do have a lot of old engines.

I have no way of identifying a thread, but I checked the Amco propnut/spinner thread against a few other engines, and it's the same thread as the Allbon Dart, DC Dart, ED Baby and Mills 75. So it can't be an unusual thread.

I checked the Amco engine test (AM August '48), but Sparey doesn't mention thread sizes. However, in view of the above, I think it's extremely likely to be 5 BA.

Edit: When posting, I noticed you wanted the compression screw thread as well. I checked and it's the same as the crankshaft. The propnut screws onto the comp screw perfectly! How's that for useless knowledge!

Edited By brokenenglish on 06/12/2017 18:36:28

Seems good to me thanks I'll check it out. I have some 5 BA nuts.

John, in one of the above posts, T.O. is certain that they're 4 BA and, in view of my non-engineering non-expertise, I should think he's probably right!

And thanks to Denis for the bit of soldering experience that many of us lack!

Edited By brokenenglish on 07/12/2017 07:10:03

06/12/2017 18:14:48

Sorry John, I'll go against your instructions and comment anyway!

I'm not an engineer or even a doctor, but I do have a lot of old engines.

I have no way of identifying a thread, but I checked the Amco propnut/spinner thread against a few other engines, and it's the same thread as the Allbon Dart, DC Dart, ED Baby and Mills 75. So it can't be an unusual thread.

I checked the Amco engine test (AM August '48), but Sparey doesn't mention thread sizes. However, in view of the above, I think it's extremely likely to be 5 BA.

Edit: When posting, I noticed you wanted the compression screw thread as well. I checked and it's the same as the crankshaft. The propnut screws onto the comp screw perfectly! How's that for useless knowledge!

Edited By brokenenglish on 06/12/2017 18:36:28

Thread: ED MK IV
27/11/2017 07:03:46
Posted by PatMc on 26/11/2017 23:31:01:

I think the Hawk came out in 1963, it was reviewed in the MA in the December issue.

Yes Pat, Oct/Nov. '63, and the Pep had already been transformed into the ZA92.

25/11/2017 21:53:51

Yeah, they're not without faults, but I possess two that run OK.

Thread: Pesky Little 1S Lipos!
24/11/2017 11:01:08

OK, Thanks for all the answers. Just about what I hoped for.

Rereading all this, it occurs to me that replacing the battery every three years or so would obviously be a wise policy. Plus the fact that I expect to get better (safer) results now that I've realised the importance of a storage charge.

I'm relieved to learn that I wasn't doing anything ridiculous... but it's a bit disturbing to learn that you can perpetrate a major disaster (house fire) without doing anything ridiculous!

Finally, Thank you all!

24/11/2017 08:36:09

Gentlemen, I don’t want to start a conjectural debate, but I need some knowledgeable advice and guidance.

I’ve been using a large capacity (1S 5.0 Ah) hard case RC car battery for a bench running spark ignition circuit. For several years now I’ve been charging this battery at 1C (5 A) and it has become very swollen.

A couple of days ago, I had a very lucky escape. I was charging the battery as usual, and it started emitting crackling/sizzling/spitting sounds. I immediately stopped charging, obviously, and very gingerly disconnected the battery and took it outdoors. It was very hot !

Obviously, that battery can no longer be used, so I’ve ordered a replacement (1S 6.4 Ah) (with a Lipo bag!!!).

I suspect that the problem with the old battery may be that, for the first 2 or 3 years, I used to leave it permanently fully charged, which leads to my simple question:

What charging current should I use to charge this new battery? And also what discharge current, for "storage" charging.

Note that I’m never in a hurry for charging, and I wouldn’t be at all bothered by a low current / long period charge.

Expert opinions invited please!!!

Thread: ED MK IV
23/11/2017 18:15:37

Mike, the Pep and the Super Fury date your pamphlet as about 1960. The Pep was introduced in 1960 and didn't last long. It was made for ED by a sub-contracting firm called Bardsleys, in Brentford High Street if I remember correctly. Note that the Pep crankcase is an exact copy of the OK Cub 049.

Edited By brokenenglish on 23/11/2017 18:17:17

Thread: Covering for use with Diesel Engines
22/11/2017 19:26:44

To go back to the OP, an easier question would have been:

"Are any coverings incompatible with diesel fuel?"

I've used various films and tex coverings over the years, with diesels, and I've never had any problem.

And for John, IMO, if you have the choice between a PAW (particularly RC) and a converted Babe Bee, you'd have to be mad (or masochistic) to choose the converted glow.

Thread: ED MK IV
17/11/2017 08:55:19

No Peter, I still use KK Truflex for gentle bench running (great fun), and I still fly using Topflite plastic with sport diesels. They haven't deteriorated at all, they're just not suitable for modern high performance (schnürle) engines.

16/11/2017 21:33:55
Posted by Tim Barker 1 on 15/11/2017 18:39:35:

I have come across an ED MKIV amongst some stuff of my father´s. I want to try and get it running again, initially on the bench, and if that is successful then maybe try and fly it. Can any body suggest a suitable size of propeller for this old diesel, preferably not too expensive, just to get it running.

Yeah, you need an old soft plastic or wood propeller, 10x6, 11x4 or 12x4.

This video shows one of mine running well.

Edited By brokenenglish on 16/11/2017 21:34:32

Edited By brokenenglish on 16/11/2017 21:39:01

Thread: Triple Connector
15/11/2017 12:27:30

To return to the OP.

Go into eBay UK "Toys & Games", and search for "triple rod connector".
You'll find loads of 'em.

Edited By brokenenglish on 15/11/2017 12:28:05

Edited By brokenenglish on 15/11/2017 12:28:25

Thread: Stick plane Plans
12/11/2017 15:18:31
Posted by David Mellor on 12/11/2017 14:30:52:

I also built a Lanzo Stick, though I cheated a bit and used a carbon tube for the boom. I like to think Chet Lanzo would have done the same if they'd been available in the 1940's.

David, respectfully, I think you mean the thirties !

12/11/2017 14:11:35

Hi,

If you're thinking of a smallish model, then it may well be David Boddington's "Mills Beam" or "Mills Bomb".
Both of these plans are available on Outerzone, you just have to look!

If you're thinking of a bigger model, then it will probably be the "Lanzo Stick". I don't have a plans source for that, but just Google "Lanzo Stick RC" and you'll find it immediately (I just did).
Concerning the Lanzo Stick, the late John Haggart built one in the sixties, and flew it quite a lot at various events around the UK Midlands, through the sixties and seventies. That may well be the model you remember.

Edited By brokenenglish on 12/11/2017 14:14:52

Edited By brokenenglish on 12/11/2017 14:15:51

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of RCM&E? Use our magazine locator link to find your nearest stockist!

Find RCM&E! 

Email News - Join our newsletter

Love Model Aircraft? Sign up to our emails for the latest news and special offers!

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
CML
electricwingman 2017
Gliders Distribution
Expo Tools 14 July
Wings & Wheels 2018
Airtek Hobbies
Overlander
Slec
Sarik
Advertise With Us
Latest "For Sale" Ads
How has your building graduated?
Q: Did you start with ARTF and move to building from kits or vice versa?

 Started with ARTF moved to building from kits only
 Started with ARTF moved to building from plans only
 Started with ARTF moved to building from kits and building from plans
 Started with building kits or from plans and moved to ARTF
 I only build from kits or plans
 I only build ARTF
 I only build from kits
 I only build from plans
 Other (Please specify in thread)

Latest Reviews
Digital Back Issues

RCM&E Digital Back Issues

Contact us

Contact us