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Original Prusa i3 Mk 2 kit

And I have no idea what I am doing

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Delta Foxtrot05/03/2017 20:57:13
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I had taken careful note about the need to fully raise the z-axis before calibration, it is good that the software tells you to confirm this has been done.
MaL05/03/2017 22:44:13
29 forum posts

I did come across a couple of horizontally opposed dummy engines, one for a cub and I think the other was a VW car engine...any good?..

**LINK**

**LINK**

Delta Foxtrot05/03/2017 22:58:39
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566 forum posts
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Thanks Mal!
I also spotted the first one on TV. I have downloaded it and will scale and print it to see how it comes out. It is a good oportunity to learn about printing with support and to undetstand the slic3r settings. This should be a useful exercise even if I wind up designing my own.
Delta Foxtrot08/03/2017 12:20:57
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I had a go at printing the model in the first file, scaled down to 40% to suit my model. It was printed with the cylinders vertical with a mass of support material which took a while to remove. The resulting print is not bad, certainly useable, but I think that there must be a better way of printing this, perhaps a better print orientation to minimise supports and better support print settings to aid removal. Being new to this, and this being the first print I have done requiring support material, I am sure I am missing some tricks.

If I design a dummy engine similar to this flat four I would be tempted to split the cylinders in half, to remove the need for supports, and glue the parts together.

Any advice on this would be welcome.

 

regards

David

Edited By Delta Foxtrot on 08/03/2017 12:22:13

Trevor Rushton08/03/2017 22:04:44
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435 forum posts
181 photos

David

Not sure I can give any advice but how about slicing it through the middle to that the cut face can lay flat - print 2 sides and join them? Split some of the other parts to make them easier to fit rather than trying to print them in one.?

I printed some large parts in "normal" mode today; still took 5.5 hours each but still pleased with the result; more grainy but for these parts (feet for a display board) it does not matter.

Not having to use Pritt at all now, but I am printing with a brim to help adhesion.

Trevor

Delta Foxtrot09/03/2017 12:26:54
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566 forum posts
91 photos

Thanks Trevor. I agree that designing the parts to eliminate / minimise support material is a good plan.

I would certainly be interested in tips others may have on optimising the print settings for support material as eventually I will need to print parts that require it.

Good to hear that you are printing away. I have not used Pritt either for the last few prints I have made. I have tweaked the live adjust up a little and still have no problems still with first layer adhesion. The parts need a little persuasion to part with the bed, even when it is fully cooled. I can pull them off with a little effort, not excessive force. Hard to know what is normal from a base of zero experience.

Model Monster17/03/2017 18:25:17
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46 forum posts
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I've been reading this thread with great interest and have just taken the plunge and ordered a Prusa i3 mk2 etc.

The inclination for this was spurred on by recent events but has been brewing unnoticed over the last year or so. I'd been trying to teach myself 2D AutoCAD as well as Compufoil, in an attempt to design my very own scale masterpiece. It was all going pretty well until at one point I got a bit stuck and despite trawling on-line tutorials etc, I couldn't figure out how to do what I wanted or needed to do, so I looked around for a suitable short course and found one at my local college. It was beyond excellent, in 6 x 3hr sessions my class was taught the basics and beyond, as a bonus we got a 3 year license for the full AutoCAD student edition and a whacking great manual. My scale design was nearing completion when the college contacted me to see if I wanted to do a new AutoCAD 3D and digital printing course. Guess what, another 6 sessions later and this is where I am now. All freshly learned with 3D stuff and another massive manual.

The more I've learnt, the more I've realised how handy these skills could be. I hope I can remember what to do, by the time the kit arrives in 7 weeks.

 

Edited By Model Monster on 17/03/2017 18:27:20

Delta Foxtrot17/03/2017 19:35:22
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566 forum posts
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Good stuff MM!
I hope you will be as pleased with your printer as I have been so far with mine.
Trevor Rushton17/03/2017 20:14:43
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435 forum posts
181 photos

Dear MM;

I echo DF; it will be worth the wait. The course sounds good - where was it if you don't mind me asking? I am on a diy learning curve with Fusion 360 but I am sure would benefit from a more structured approach.

Model Monster18/03/2017 12:48:58
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46 forum posts
101 photos
The courses were run at Uxbridge college I think they do them every few months,one evening a week for six weeks.
Trevor Rushton20/03/2017 22:55:32
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435 forum posts
181 photos

Thanks MM; Uxbridge cold be doable at a stretch for me, but not ideal; I will keep an eye out for something closer to home ( Surrey).

My Prusa earned its keep at the weekend by making a Stand-off for a new ceiling mounted light; I used the lowest red for this, but the quality was still very good. I think the next trick is to configure the print to make best use of the "grain"; it's a trade off between a simple print ( i.e. No temporary support) and strength.

Delta Foxtrot21/03/2017 11:15:39
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566 forum posts
91 photos

Trevor,

Good to hear you are making some practical use of your Prusa.

I have turned my thoughts back to my Druine Turbulent build, after parking this to get the Prusa sorted. I have just started experimenting with printing the engine cowling. The first attempt is close in terms of shape, but needs a few tweaks. It is far too heavy as I printed it with 2 mm thick walls. Next pass, after tweaking the shape, is to learn how to get the wall thickness right down. There are some fully 3D printed models that use a single perimeter to print so it can be done, I just need to work out how.

Edited By Delta Foxtrot on 21/03/2017 11:17:07

Trevor Rushton16/04/2017 08:26:23
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435 forum posts
181 photos

I don't have very much to show for my efforts so far, but I remain very pleased with the results of the Prusa. My drag knife project is coming on well and I have just made a nose cone and fin attachment ring for a soda bottle rocket for my nephew; test firing today!

I have printed quite a lot of stuff at low quality and for general purpose stuff I have to say it's fine. I do find pla a bit brittle though and might buy a small roll of abs and nylon for experiments.

I think print accuracy is very good; if you print a 20mm cylinder you get a 20 mm cylinder; the drag knife is made from a series of tubes that fit together; all a good interference fit.

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