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Tom Sharp 218/03/2018 02:15:19
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Charging will be by induction, no connected wires. Charging wires will be underground, like alongside the pavement, just park your car above a charging wire and it will charge. A smart meter will bill you according to use.

My shaver and toothbrush both charge without a direct connection and on BBC 'Click' show the other night they had a smoke alarm that derived it's power from the radiation emitted from ones wireless hub.

Trevor18/03/2018 08:07:32
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Great idea in principle but my toothbrush takes about 18hrs to charge a battery that could be charged in 15-20min via a direct connection. I suspect that delivering high power levels by induction poses serious problems, particularly in public places.

Cars have been a fact of everyday life for a couple of generations now, yet we still end up leaving them in the road. I don't remember the streets being littered with bikes and horses overnight before the age of the car! If the advent of electric cars puts more pressure on developers (or even a change to the building regs?) to make sensible provision for them, then so much the better.

Trevor

Trevor Crook18/03/2018 08:08:14
628 forum posts
40 photos

I worry about the effeciency of induction charging, Tom. Surely it must be more lossy than copper? Not a concern for phones and toothbrushes, but when you are charging at a few kilowatts.......

Percy Verance18/03/2018 08:16:56
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Don't Bosch have a similar system now for some of their professional power tools Tom? I ask because I'm sure I've seen it somewhere. I don't tend to buy too many power tools, but if I do then I go for quality. Usually Makita or those bright yellow jobs. Not that Bosch aren't quality of course.

Trevor

I rather think some Local Authorities have changed their regs already. Certainly, not too far from me there was/is a housing development being constructed, and one of the plannning requirements is that an EV charging dock must be installed at each property. That came from from one of the buiders whom has been engaged in the scheme. I had him to do some work on my own renovations last year. And as part of those renovations I also needed the main power feed into my house to be moved, as I wished to extend at the point it then entered my home. The main feed was also switched from overhead to underground at my request. I did notice that the new cable looked considerably heavier than the old overhead one. I asked why this was, and the engineer said simply "we're doing them all like this now". Preparing for future needs perhaps?

Induction charging using the high current required isn't possible at the moment, but don't lose sight of the fact that once over flying to far flung destinations was simply unheard of. Just because we don't currently (sorry) have a solution, doesn't mean there isn't one........

 

 

 

 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 18/03/2018 08:39:23

Alan Jarvis18/03/2018 09:31:01
127 forum posts
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Buses are already using induction charging at bus stops.

http://www.cbi.org.uk/insight-and-analysis/milton-keynes-wirelessly-charged-electric-buses/

They operate from 6am to 11.30pm

 

 

 

 

Edited By Alan Jarvis on 18/03/2018 09:32:46

Percy Verance18/03/2018 09:37:33
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6263 forum posts
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Well there we go then. Maybe the solution isn't so far away after all?

It must be 30+ years since I travelled on a bus! Where I am - out in the sticks - there are just three buses per day. Morning, afternoon, evening (5pm-ish), that's it. Some rural communities in these parts have lost bus services altogether. Still, I guess that's the price of living in the sticks. 

Edited By Percy Verance on 18/03/2018 09:52:19

Alan Jarvis18/03/2018 09:38:02
127 forum posts
22 photos

Last year, South Korea switched on a 12km (7.5-mile) road which can recharge electric vehicles as they drive over it, without the need for vehicles to stop at all. Two public buses are using the Online Electric Vehicle system, or OLEV, in the South Korean city of Gumi.

The technology means the vehicles can be fitted with smaller, lighter batteries, reducing the amount of power required to drive them.

Cuban818/03/2018 09:51:52
1852 forum posts
2 photos
Posted by Alan Jarvis on 18/03/2018 09:31:01:

Buses are already using induction charging at bus stops.

http://www.cbi.org.uk/insight-and-analysis/milton-keynes-wirelessly-charged-electric-buses/

They operate from 6am to 11.30pm

Edited By Alan Jarvis on 18/03/2018 09:32:46

We had something similar when I was a kid, not wireless it's true, they were called trolly buses. Modern versions are still in widespread use world-wide. Remember these very well in the early 60s, they were nicely appointed with comfortable seats and didn't vibrate like motor buses. The motor made a quiet but very sci-fi type whistling sound when operating, not unlike the early jets. Great times, big mistake to get rid of them.**LINK**

Percy Verance18/03/2018 09:54:01
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6263 forum posts
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Oddly Alan, those were my first thoughts as soon as I read your previous bus charging post.......

C8

I remember seeing trolley buses in the Leeds/Bradford area as a child when I was visting relatives. And yes, the humming/whistling sound sticks in my mind too.

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 18/03/2018 10:00:25

Denis Watkins18/03/2018 10:03:51
2567 forum posts
129 photos

Manchester too had the overhead cables for the trolley buses when I was a kid

The Transformer House for Middleton trams is still their too

J D 818/03/2018 11:12:36
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795 forum posts
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I remember trolley buses in Cardiff,one problem they had was idiots parking under the overhead pick up cables.

In Germany they have trolley buses with on board battery's so they can leave the overhead lines and travel several miles to pick up passengers before returning to the grid and continue the journey while recharging.

Frank Skilbeck18/03/2018 12:26:59
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3954 forum posts
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Posted by Trevor on 18/03/2018 08:07:32:

Great idea in principle but my toothbrush takes about 18hrs to charge a battery that could be charged in 15-20min via a direct connection.

Possibly, but it could be that you just put your toothbrush back on the stand after use, so the manufacture has just designed it to charge slowly, i.e. it keeps it topped up between uses. If it was designed to charge up in 20 mins rather than 18 hrs it would need to be 54x more powerful and would end up consuming more electricity all day if left on the stand.

Percy Verance18/03/2018 14:22:31
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6263 forum posts
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Frank

P.M. sent......

Piers Bowlan18/03/2018 14:56:40
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1195 forum posts
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There are over fifty countries that still use trolley buses. Batteries to make their operation more flexible seem to make a lot of sense, to me at least. Using a long pantograph pole they have the ability to change lanes so parked cars and roadworks should not be a problem (unlike trams) - they weren't when they used to run in Ealing many years ago. They also represent a much smaller investment than trams systems and are more flexible to boot, not to mention quieter. There was a £35m feasibility study to run a tram system down the Uxbridge Road to ease congestion some years ago. Trouble was, the tram lines would close one of the lanes of the road which would only made the traffic congestion problem worse! They should have asked me and saved themselves £35m. There was a proposed trollybus project in Leeds but it was cancelled in 2016- why, I don't know. I wonder how much they spent on that feasibility study? In fact the amount of money wasted on feasibility studies is eye watering, Severn hydro electric barrage, Hinkley point, HS2 and don't get me started on Heathrow's third runway (a no brainer). Controversial, what me? devil wink 2

Edited By Piers Bowlan on 18/03/2018 15:01:13

Frank Skilbeck19/03/2018 22:56:20
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3954 forum posts
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Rolls Royce engineering (not the BMW car division) is getting in on the battery development research https://www.theengineer.co.uk/rolls-royce-energy-storage/

Tom Sharp 219/03/2018 23:30:59
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2740 forum posts
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Posted by Denis Watkins on 18/03/2018 10:03:51:

Manchester too had the overhead cables for the trolley buses when I was a kid

The Transformer House for Middleton trams is still their too

North Manchester had trolley buses, South Manchester, a different company, did not.

Cuban820/03/2018 06:55:28
1852 forum posts
2 photos
The trolly buses also carried a long pole for the crew to reconnect the power pickup when it came off the wires. Not an uncommon thing IIRC. BTW, saw my second Tesla yesterday!

Edited By Cuban8 on 20/03/2018 06:57:32

Graham R20/03/2018 09:27:05
269 forum posts
16 photos

Many years ago, my 1st adult bicycle had a dynamo built in to the wheel hub and this would power the lights. If applied to a car could this be used to put back a little charge into the battery? Do they use this on electric cars?

Frank Skilbeck20/03/2018 09:45:04
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3954 forum posts
95 photos
Posted by Graham R on 20/03/2018 09:27:05:

Many years ago, my 1st adult bicycle had a dynamo built in to the wheel hub and this would power the lights. If applied to a car could this be used to put back a little charge into the battery? Do they use this on electric cars?

 

They use the motors to recharge the battery when the car is slowing down, the new Nissan Leaf has settings where you can adjust the amount of regenerative braking, they call it one pedal driving as when you take your foot off the accelerator it then uses the kinetic energy to recharge the battery. One reason why the brake pads last so long, but this has led to another problem with brake discs corroding because they are never cleaned by the brake pads, because the user doesn't use the mechanical brakes. https://www.nissan-global.com/EN/TECHNOLOGY/OVERVIEW/e_Pedal.html

Edited By Frank Skilbeck on 20/03/2018 09:49:08

J D 820/03/2018 09:50:48
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795 forum posts
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Feasibility studiesangry 2 Jobs for the boys and girls. What a waist, you are right there Piers.

The amount spent on one for the proposed Motor circuit of Wales could have built half the track!

John.

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