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A380

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Simon Chaddock10/09/2012 12:32:36
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Nothing unique but I saw my first A380 climbing out of Manchester on Saturday, closely followed by a 747-400 on a similar flight path.

Although the fuselages are not that different in length the A380 has a simply huge wing area and compared to the 747 much broader at the root but tapering to a skinny tip.

And a noticably deeper note as it flew away.

Concorde Speedbird10/09/2012 16:46:30
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I haven't seen one, certainly an impressive aeroplane! The A380 has the same tyres as Concorde by the way (had to pop that in!).

CS

Bill_B10/09/2012 16:54:16
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My Avatar is the fan off a Trent 900 which powers some A380s. Wouldn't get me on one though!

Edited By Bill_B on 10/09/2012 16:59:44

Josip Vrandecic -Mes10/09/2012 17:40:11
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Folk saying : ''Shortfall is the same as overthrow ''...if You let me ....I guess that the upper limit of usefulness and safety has 747 ,including computer's hardwear and softwear...

A-380 reminds me of cosmetic surgery (increasing of female attributes)...yes, off topic, but I could not resist...face 6

Erfolg10/09/2012 20:59:11
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I thought they were daily out of Manchester at about 14:30 in Emirates colours.

Certainly we see one every Wednesday, directly over our field, which as you know is probably about 4 miles from you.

I guess it turns quite sharply normally, if you are not seeing it.

I get the impression that the air ambulance is landing more often at South Manchester Hospital (Wythenshawe).

Anyway the A380 although looking big is always far higher than it appears to be, the cloud base often gives a clue as to how high it really is, as it disappears and then reappears..

Chris Bott - Moderator10/09/2012 22:21:48
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When I've seen an A380 (usually when I've been driving in the Heathrow area) it always appears to be flying incredibly slowly. It's obviously an illusion due to it's incredible size. As Erfolg says I think it appears to be closer than it really is.

The first time I saw it I was near Windsor watching it on approach to Heathrow. With all it's landing real estate hanging out and those curved wings, it really was an amazing sight. It did look like it should drop out of the sky due to lack of speed that time too.

John Privett10/09/2012 22:22:58
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I flew out to Singapore on one last month en route to Australia. Then back on one 3 weeks later. They are huge, yet don't really look that big on the ground - at least not until you see an "ordinary" plane nearby.

We had seats "upstairs" (sadly not the expensive business class ones!) both ways, but apart from the inconspicuous stairway behind the rear galley there was very little to suggest that there was a whole bunch of people rather than suitcases beneath our feet!

David Gilder11/09/2012 00:13:45
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Guess I am quite lucky!

I see the A380 on its approach to Manchester most days at reasonably low level as it does its final turn onto finals over the Glossop / Mottram area!

It really is a sight to behold!

I will try and get some pics one day!!!!!

Dave

wink

The Wright Stuff11/09/2012 15:23:23
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Saw one at the Farnborough Air Show. The seemingly near-vertical climb out and the way the pilot threw it around was absolutely incredible. I guess it has to be low on fuel (and passengers) when it did that!!!

David perry 111/09/2012 17:46:43
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That 380 wing root is 3m thick at the deepest point! I recall seeing the root of the Sandringham class flying boats, and I thought they were thick!

Ive seen them flying below and above me at work, and they look utterly unique. Well, they would I guess.

Pointless in model form of course, as their main attribute is their great size; scale that down and well, its all rather gone!

Whereas an 87% pitts...ha ha

David

Chris Bott - Moderator11/09/2012 18:11:57
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Posted by David perry 1 on 11/09/2012 17:46:43:

Pointless in model form of course, as their main attribute is their great size; scale that down and well, its all rather gone!

Ooh I don't know David.

Here's one that was built in 2004 in a little known material then - Depron. It was powered by very early lipos taht were made up from dozens of mobile phone sized cells. Motors were canibalised from CD rom drives and rewound, and I don't think 2.4Ghz radio has been heard of. I'm fairly sure it flew before the full size A380.

Imagine what could be done now!

Bill_B12/09/2012 11:07:17
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Ironic then, that the model in the video has electric motors. The R-R Trent 900 engine which can power the A380 is classed as an ''electric'' engine. This of course refers to the fact that the engines have starter/generators as opposed to the usual (separate) generators & air starters. I believe this is the first time R-R have returned to electric starters since the last of the Dart Turboprops were manufactured (MK 552).

Simon Chaddock12/09/2012 11:44:49
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As David P points out a model A380 is just another 4 jet airliner and would loose the most impressive feature of the full size unless it can fly at something like a 'visual' scale speed.

To do this would require a really challenging light weight construction.wink 2

David perry 112/09/2012 15:23:46
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Thanks for the video but to my eye it merely proves my point. Speed of a body is judged by a human by how long it takes it to travel its own length, so a bullet is perceived as fast whereas a plane doing the same speed is not. The A380 is perceived as being quite slow and majestic because it is sooooo big. The model in the video, whilst good in its own right, might as well be a Cargo or a Wot 4.

A 380 model of about 60 foot long would be impressive, but still not quite an A380. As Simon says, if a fifteen foot 380 could be made to weigh about a pound it might work, but then it would not handle correctly.

Anyway, its a bit like marmite I guess, and in this case...I don't.

David

Chris Bott - Moderator12/09/2012 15:31:08
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I think put next to the real thing, it would be the same story for any scale model at all.

But I do get your point, having seen the real thing just seemingly hanging there, appearing to be going far too slow to fly.

Edited By Chris Bott - Moderator on 12/09/2012 15:31:21

Allan Bowker12/09/2012 20:56:38
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Edited By Chris Bott - Moderator on 12/09/2012 22:44:53

Josip Vrandecic -Mes12/09/2012 22:10:46
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Thanks Allan,but since I found out that these models are filled with helium...I'm not impressed...crook

Cheers

Joe

Chris Bott - Moderator12/09/2012 22:47:24
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Why not impressed Josip? Helium is just a way of adding lightness. That flying looked pretty tricky to me too.

Allan Bowker13/09/2012 00:04:22
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I did wonder the same Josip. Is using Helium cheating?

Considering modellers use any material to remove needless weight from our models, why not use gas? Another goal for some is scale flying and speed (this looked VERY scale in speed for me).

I see Helium as a way forward, especially for indoor models that need to be ultra light weight. I would love to have an indoor model like that one day, which I'm sure we all will be able to buy before long.

Sorry if this thread has gone a bit off topic but I thought this video was of an A380 flying indoors, turns out it was an A310 after all!

 

Edited By Allan Bowker on 13/09/2012 00:09:42

Plummet13/09/2012 09:26:04
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An A380 visited Broughton i N. Wales a bit ago, to see where its wings were made, and as part of an Aerospace Airshor there. My Mother-in-law lives nearby. I was in her garden doing DIY for her. An A380 did a low and slow run right over the house. Most impressive - huge and quiet, but I suppose that the volume knobs were turned well down for the "slow" bit of it.

Plummet

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