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  1. I hope I'm posting this correctly, I've only posted once or twice before). I recently finished this Magnatilla and had a successful maiden a couple of weeks back. It was a lovely calm day and after only a little bit of trimming the model flew very nicely - it does tend to climb a little under throttle, but it's quite manageable (even for a relative newbie like me). It's an electric set up (4s3300mAh) - so I thought I'd include an image of the battery location - all recommended and supplied by George at 4 max. . 4m
    13 points
  2. I took delivery of my Fiat CR42 at our last flying session and my pal Derek has sent me through some nice static shots of the completed model - with the 3D printed bust of Mussolini's son as a pilot figure, the final added scale details and squadron markings. It will be the spring before I fly this marvellous model myself. 50" span (~1/8th scale), weighs 5lb 4oz, for a wing loading of 18.8 oz/sq ft, Powered by a D3548 motor, 11x5.5" APC-E prop and a 4s1p 3600mah Lipo .
    13 points
  3. Thread on the site , just completed maiden flight
    11 points
  4. Good luck with the DB SE5, there's nothing really wrong with the original kits. I've just finished restoring one I built over 25 years ago. I'd used (painted) Solartex as the covering; time and glow fuel took its toll on the finish so all the covering was stripped off and recovered with Sig Koverall and painted with Klass Kote. Its flying again now with its original Laser 200v which, to my mind is the perfect fit for the model.
    9 points
  5. Thanks EarlyBird. I did wonder why they appeared as download icons but felt life was too short! I'll quote my own post and re-add the images Graham Images now correctly added!
    9 points
  6. This is new to me but it was built by a Club mate who had to give up flying. I re-engined it with an OS61FX but that struggled to pull the rather heavy airframe around big manoeuvres. It now has an OS 91FX in it - same crankcase so dead easy upgrade. Still running in the engine so probably quite a bit more power to come. Vertical performance is now much better but will no doubt improve as the engine loosens up. It really needs a new cowl as the pitts silencer it came with required most of the bottom of the cowl removed. There are now so many holes in the top to accommodate 3 different needle valves as well.
    8 points
  7. Superb way to end 2021 yesterday with a 'high octane' PSS Fly-In upon The Great Orme - 12 pilots I counted at our peak (some of the locals only joined us for a couple of hours) and we enjoyed a sunny, dry, blustery day with epic lift throughout!! Some photos in the link below - the title Image shows Andy Meade with his new F-105 Thunderchief which was bravely and succesfully maidened in winds approaching 70mph. Impressive stuff! Happy New Year to everyone!!
    7 points
  8. Happy New Year to all my scale buddies Just to finish off the exhaust section, I silver soldered brass plates to blank off the ends of the pipe, and tapped for a pressure nipple. Cheers Danny
    7 points
  9. With our latest Mass Build project all wrapped up, a group discussion over a few pints of Tim Taylors Landlord had us thinking about a different way of building in an attempt to have some fun over the winter break and producing some exciting new PSS models to test at the start of the 2022 flying season. The focus was on a relatively small, cheap and quick to build scale model and we came up with the concept of the 48 Hour Build Challenge – ‘One Sheet is Plenty!’ The aim is simple – Using only a single sheet of high density foam board and a single sheet of balsa – each modeller will scratch build and finesse a scale R/C model fit for use on the slope within a 48 hour build window. The model must be representative of a full-size powered aircraft, and after the 48 hours are up it must be in a fit state to fly from the slope. The choice of subject, it’s size, scale and complexity are left completely up to you, your only limitation is the raw materials used for construction and the overall time allowed for the build! Typical R/C fittings and hardware can be utilised in the build as needed but the primary building materials must be limited to the foam and balsa sheeting! Work on the design concept, plans and preparation for the build can start now in advance – the 48 hour limit is solely for the build! Ideally the model would be a bespoke ‘Own Design’ creation but builders can also adapt an existing plan if that’s less daunting. As with the traditional Mass Build concept we’re all in this together and the aim is to build simultaneously over the chosen weekend of 5th and 6th March. We will run a pre-event Zoom call on the Friday evening for anyone who is keen to register and take part. The Zoom call will enable us to introduce our chosen subject matter and show off any drawings you may have already compiled to aid your build. The build itself will commence from 6am on the Saturday morning and will run until 6am on Monday 7th March. Monday evening we will aim to repeat the Zoom call to show off the fruits of our labour – no doubt with a well earned beer! For anyone wanting to take part who’s unable to match those exact timescales due to work or family commitments – please join us and pick your own 48 hour window as close as you can to the target weekend – we’d really like as many members to take part as possible! The aim is to bring all of the 48 hour build models together when we meet for our first event of the 2022 season on The Great Orme on April 9th and 10th. So that’s the plan – we’ve already seen a lot of interest in the concept and I think we should have a good collection of bespoke hand crafted foam models at the slope in April – who knows what types of PSS model it will generate!? Use the time now to choose your subject and get drawing/sketching so you can commence your build running…The clock will be ticking! If you would like to take part in the Zoom call at 8pm (UK time) on Friday 4th March please drop me an email to register and I will add you to the invite when it goes out – [email protected]
    6 points
  10. Weather was poor today with freezing fog throughout most of the day - so no rigging and no photo in the garden... Instead I final sanded all of the tailplane, elevators, fins and rudders and gave them all their first coat of filler primer. The foam was placed inside the servo bays to avoid overspray. Quite happy with the finish, there are a few pin holes now evident in the fins where I was too tight with the resin (I glassed these some time back) and some damaged/pulled weave areas in the cloth on the tail - a little 3M putty will sort all those out before another sand ready for the final grey primer. I did a little more canopy fitting and alignment checking to the front fuselage too, still some work needed here... the canopy is formed in quite a thick material - almost 1/16" - I somehow need to blend that edge into the fuselage all round.
    6 points
  11. It has been a good week for flying, cold of course, but so calm and often sunny. I took the photo quad up yesterday, just to cycle the batteries more than anything but was fascinated by how the frost remained around the tree shadows near the club caravan.
    6 points
  12. With some very light sanding and a second coat of black followed by some acrylic lacquer spray and stick on decals it now looks like this. At 587 g (20.7 oz) with an 1800 mAh 3s it weighs exactly the same as the earlier Prototype Hunter. It also has the benefit of a slightly more powerful 50 mm EDF. The most obvious scale error is the roundels should have white borders!
    6 points
  13. Final 2021 update. Things have been rather delayed for a variety of reasons. I was off work all last week and half of this week with suspected covid. My tests were all negative but i had all the symptoms so.. Anyway in the background the crankcases for the FT 160/200 were being manufactured and i was able to get one together to test the mechanical aspects of the case. For the most part it has gone well and everything works nicely. I will be moving the cams a little to improve pushrod angles and cosmetic appearance but that is about all. Once we are back in the new year the revisions will be made and the crankcases will get their cosmetic treatment as well. The final jobs will be to make a new mount for the back, and the new exhausts. Its likely the first engines out the door will be supplied with no exhausts but the price will reflect this. As a parting gift for the year, here is the FT160 doing its thing on the bench with a 16x8 RAM prop. Fingers crossed 2022 is better all around.
    6 points
  14. Merry Christmas to all of our PSSA members in the UK and around the world - many thanks to everyone whos helped make 2021 a successful and memorable flying season!
    6 points
  15. A few photos from yesterday's re-maiden (also with added black trim to wing LE for better head-on visibility). Dry weight now 5.5lbs but still comparatively very Lite, and slows down beautifully for landings exactly where I want to put it down. Extra power very noticeable with, for e.g., knife-edge (not me yet...just when my mate was flying it!)
    5 points
  16. A little more done today. The process is shown on Youtube, just look for my page. Cheers Danny
    5 points
  17. Some more work achieved today on the tailplane mount which now all aligns and bolts up nicely into the rear fuselage. I still need to set the incidence of the tail relative to the wing but this will be done later after more work is completed around the wing-root. Tailplane has a pair of carbon rods for location dowels at the front and is held in place now with 2 x 5mm nylon bolts reacting against a ply load spreader towards the rear. Captive nuts into the ply housing - positioned here for the camera - they have since been reversed so the bolts pull them through the ply when loaded. All nice and square and secure. With this now fitted I'm hoping for a full rig photo this weekend if the weather is kind enough.
    5 points
  18. The answers given by the BMFA and others look entirely reasonable and consistant with the way it has been for ever, can't see the issue myself, however, paying your own would solve what you see as a problem. Pay yourself or via your club ? Swings and roundabouts for me. Our club ? Pay yourself if you want, or via the club, no drama either way. Date on my doc ? Couldn't care less, The BMFA tells me I'm insured from when I pay my club, they know their job, good enough for me.
    5 points
  19. The mild weather has given me the chance to get some paint on at last. Matt black rattle can from the motor spares shop, I had intended taking the masking off but on inspection in the better light there is some more paint to go one.
    5 points
  20. So, I've added some basic insignia. I hand made these using white Oratex and black vinyl tape. I dulled down the tape by sanding lightly and covering with matt water based clear. More flying after Christmas eh! Hope you all enjoy the festive season.. Cheers from Sunny Australia
    5 points
  21. My Blackburn 1912 Monoplane (RM 140 plans (UK Radio Modeler or - Sarik Hobbies MAG1523 plans) Built and flown long long time ago, used just rudder, elevator and throttle, plus brushed motor, Olympus belt drive, 11" x 7" prop, and brushed motor and Nicad (probably 6 cells), flew great using rudder, looked very realistic. But, if you are looking for an aerobatic speed machine ......... Ray.
    5 points
  22. i think this myth about high nitro fuel being better (especially for 4 strokes) comes from the fact that many people never touch their slow run needles. I have gone over this before, but manufacturers like os and saito ship their engines with slow run needles set quite rich. Why? because they do not test run them a rich slow run almost guarantees the engine will at least start. If the engine is set 'correctly' without running the engine there is a chance it will be a shade lean for that specific engine and the engine will not start. This causes problems as many people really struggle with diagnosis of an engine that will not fire up at all. So you fire up your new beast on 5% fuel and it idles badly, shakes about, stops etc. This happens until the club expert tells you to use 10% nitro and hey presto! much better. So you conclude that high nitro is better and the myth continues. The reality is that high nitro fuel needs a richer mix than lower nitro and the change to 10% fuel often brings the engine into tune with the formerly rich slow run tuning it shipped with. For the sake of maybe 2 minutes with a small screw driver the slow run needle could be adjusted to suit the 5% fuel you started with and the engine would perform just fine. The other one is my personal crusade, tank placement. High nitro fuel will to some degree allow a little more tolerance if the tank placement is poor. So for the small amount of effort needed to get the tank placement right and tune up your slow run needle you can ditch the expensive and thirsty 10+% fuel and drop to 5. It will save you money, make the model cleaner, give longer flight times, and you can be all smug when your engine just keeps going and going
    5 points
  23. Hi, I am in the process of making my own Mini Indoor Autogyro but 1st I need to experiment making a head. This one is using a silicon tube to allow movement of the head Up-Down Left-Right the bearings in the tiny bell motor work really well. Of coarse weight has to be kept down to a minimum. I may go with this one . Steve.
    4 points
  24. Another super winter morning's flying today at the local site, very light wind, cold sunny, massive blue skies. A bit soggy underfoot, but the grass is still short enough for landing and take offs if you select the right models. Just a couple of hours at the patch before lunch, which was just about right -great to have a wee catch up with my clubmates and didn't break anything all weekend, which is a good result.
    4 points
  25. Been bashing on with it. Fus stripes now painted on and the lettering and roundels added ready for the clear lacquer when the canopy and little man have been fitted. The pics show it at its current stage for weighing and a cg check. The tank, batteries and remaining servos have been simply stuffed in the front for this. Motor is angled to make the carb align with the tank centre. Obviously quite a few bits to add such as linkages but the weight as you see it is 13.5 lb, triple checked, and the cg is currently very slightly in front of the planned position, so quite relieved. If there is enough prop showing it should be no problem for the 180. Hoping for sub 15 lb in the end.
    4 points
  26. The depron wrapping on the fuselage was formed cold round a vac cleaner extension tube when forming depron it has a grain which is not noticeable but one way it forms the other it splits.
    4 points
  27. So here is a start on the basic frame of the body. After two sides are built out of 1/16th balsa stripe. Steve.
    4 points
  28. Slowly completing the airframe. The servo wires for each elevator half pass down through the fin into the fuselage where one is fed into a servo reverser. The servo reverser output is combined with the other servo via a Y lead. The single wire is then fed inside the fuselage spine to the cockpit. The fuselage planking can then be made good. Canopy still to do and quite a few 'scale bits' need to added to the underside. It will be painted black overall in the style of the Black Arrows of 111 squadron.
    4 points
  29. The top and each side of the fuselage has now been covered, not the bottom yet as I still need access for installing the control cable and servo cable runs. The covering is again Sig Koverall. Prior to covering, a bit of work was done in making the the landing light and a ground signalling light removable. This picture shows the original lamps glued into position. The lamps were 12v 50w and 35w halogen ones driven by a circuit I had designed using my limited electronics skills. The signalling lamp flashed ½ second on ½ second off, which was all I could achieve with a simple 555 timer. I was going to retain the system as is, however on testing the circuit the ground signalling light would flash but the landing light wouldn’t work. There is a fault on the board somewhere which makes one of the relays chatter and I can’t find out why. It looked a bit Heath Robinson so a neater and more modern approach would be 12v 4.2w leds and a Powerbox lightbox powered by a small 3s lipo. This amazing little unit has 4 programmable outputs so will do all I want to achieve (its on order but not arrived yet). Also, the lamps were glued in which made changing them impossible without causing damage. Fortunately neither lamp failed, however I decided that making the lamps capable of replacement would be a better arrangement so the old units have been cut out and the new ones held in with screws. The landing light is now held in place by a simple fibreglass ring which retains the glass lens (a cabochon) and in turn, the lamp. The ground signalling lamp is held by trapping the flange of the lamp between two liteply formers screwed to bearers in the fuselage. The fibreglass ring was moulded in place using trusty parcel tape as the release medium. A few layers of 50 gm cloth followed the curves and once dry, a hole cut out which was slightly smaller than the cabochon to hold it in place and the excess trimmed off the rear to form another circle. Small wood screws screwed into the original ply ring hold everything together. At first I drilled the holes too close to the edge of the ply ring, so had to apply the trusty Cataloy and have another go. This time the holes are in the right place. I'm sure the final painting will cover up the mistakes!
    4 points
  30. After all the local crap promotional ads by Ian Botham the wheels fell off. Is it true that your test team bypassed quarantine because they cannot catch anything that comes from a bat? Just fishing and waiting for a bite
    4 points
  31. She’s a flier CG 150mm back from LE 12mm rates on everything All the rudder movement I could get
    4 points
  32. apart from one tube that didn't take and I had to redo, the exhausts went well. Need to attach the feed and blank the ends. I think a pressure nipple might also be required. A bit of a clean up and you can see the joint is good, with a nice radius. Need to do the feed pipe next. Cheers Danny
    4 points
  33. This looks much nicer - and no more wobble! The OS one (with correct OS washer) from Just Engines:
    4 points
  34. Thought I would post this corrected flight video link for my Junkers J1 that we flew this fall and is included in the Feb 2022 Parting shot. I must have made a typo for the link. Apologies. The Junkers J.1 (actually manufacturers # J4) was a ground support and reconnaissance biplane. Nicknamed the Mobelwagen “furniture van", or “Moving Van” or the “flying tank”. The J.I was very rugged and well liked by its crews despite its clumsy handling, entering front line service in August 1917 with the official name of “Junk 1”. The J.I was the first almost all metal mass produced “in service” aircraft with a cantilevered sesquiplane wing configuration sheeted in 2mm thick corrugated duraluminum. The front of the fuselage was wrapped in a 1/4” steel armour plate tub (weighting 470kg, 1,040 lbs) protecting the engine, fuel tanks, radio gear, and crew - making it almost invulnerable to ground fire. The rear fuselage was formed with a duraluminum tubular frame covered in fabric. Flying surfaces were controlled by pushrods rather than flying wire to resist ground fire. Most losses occurred during landings and takeoffs. A weight comparison: the Junkers J1 weighed 4700lbs, a Sopwith Camel weighed around 1450 lbs, and a DR1 weighed about 1290lbs. Our local aviation museum (CASM) kindly allowed my friend Chuck and me to bring my J1 model for comparison photos with the actual J1 serial 586/18 which I have also included. 2nd flight link here: https://youtu.be/Sp3NyVGBPc4 Long flight with wheels off landing https://youtu.be/pu8spy1-crE Part flight and landing https://youtu.be/QW_e2NtTQqs The Build thread here: https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php...
    3 points
  35. With the basic wing structure completed it was time to move on to the fiddly bits, ailerons and airbrakes. Oh how I dread the faff of fitting airbrakes! It's often a tight squeeze for the servo and the linkage, and choosing to incorporate hatches also adds to the workload. I did contemplate leaving them off but, with a small airfield to operate from, I like my gliders to have some stopping power. Although I'm still undecided as to whether or not this is a glider .......... Servo shoe horned in to the unusually small D-box and secured with hot glue, a hatch below allows access to connect the linkage: Brake at full deflection: Ailerons hinged with Robert style point hinges, wing tip profiling completed: Aileron and brake hatches, wiring complete leaving only the wing joiner tubes to be fitted, sanding and covering. Note also the hard points for the struts: Just for fun I thought I'd trial fit the wings, they went on fairly smoothly but I have some wriggle room if needed before I epoxy the brass joiner tubes in place, without the struts they are very floppy:
    3 points
  36. 1st "bit of interest" I am using an old technique used in the period for the tail feathers, in this case the tailplane. A thin core of 1/16" balsa to provide the shape required. The tailplane and elevators have an 8" chord which means I can join 2 pieces of 1/16" x 4" of balsa to provide the core. The split rear tailplane spar has been glued to the core and the elevator section of the core removed to have the elevator front split spar fitted. Next the leading edge, which will be made up of 4 laminations of 1/16" strip stuck to the core. The strips will be wetted with a water mister on both sides of the strip only where the corners are. The strip will be held in place using a mixture of pins, clothes pegs and weigh in the form of expired 6v lead acid gel batteries. 1st strip in position. 2nd strip 3rd strip fitted and the whole assembly left weighted to dry flat. Final strip will be added tomorrow night.
    3 points
  37. Thanks Eric, I still have a bit left but I sure people would be interested in a suitable substitute to Sheffield Insulations blue foam? I had a play with the back of a front seat, but unlike the back seat which has lumps and ripples standing proud, the front seat had ridges and ripples going inwards, much harder to replicate, still better than smooth surfaces. Hopefully I can make a little more convincing with the airbrush. Video on how the back seat was done. Cheers Danny
    3 points
  38. Hi All, And a Happy New Year to you all. Well I was convinced that I had glass cloth somewhere in the cupboards, but after a good search through nothing was found, so I ordered some and it finally arrived yesterday. Whilst waiting, I gave the hull a coat of sanding sealer, the dope based type not the water based type, and sanded it with wet and dry. So, with no time like the present the cloth was cut and I applied a coat of Poly C through the cloth and then two more coats after it had dried. Poly C is great stuff applied in thin coats, however, back to my earlier comment about the sanding sealer, on a previous model I used water based sanding sealer and what I found was that the Poly C, also water based softened the sanding sealer/balsa to the point that several areas had to be cut out as the balsa had warped very badly. I don't think it would have been an issue here with the hull but better safe than sorry, nothing worse than repairing a model whilst still building it. Left overnight to dry and cut off the excess cloth with a new blade Then a gentle rub down with wet and dry once more Mixing up some of "Freddie B's" filler recipe which is basically mixing all of the above ingredients in equal quantities (ignore the Poly C) into a paste and apply and leave to dry thoroughly and sand away leaving a smooth finish. It looks a mess but it will all sand away as it just fills the holes and weave. Next, Sanding back the filler and apply more if needed. Plus I'll finish off the power cables and solder all the connections now that I have all the bits I need That's all for now Regards Robert
    3 points
  39. Now the fun of CoG balance. Helpfully the optimum mark is engraved on the inside of the fuselage. Judicious positioning of the lipos gave me a good starting point.
    3 points
  40. It's been some time since I've done any work on the 2 fins but now the interfacing tailplane is glassed these needed a bit of work to ensure they still fit snugly. Whilst I had them on the bench I fitted the 2 rudder servos and the aero covers which required some little hardwood mounts cut from the type of block you buy to mount cowls on fuselages. The small green tool I made to aid with fitting the blocks with the right recess - it was a right angle of the same thickness as the white plastic cover - shaped to allow you to hold the block in place with the green alignment tool flush to the surface - once each block is positioned you can remove the green tool and add some glue - worked well. The little fibrelgass rudder horn still needs to be fitted in the slot to the right - these parts are then ready for a final sand and primer.
    3 points
  41. Well it is finished and ready to test when the wind drops to civilised levels and the temperature rises above freezing and the mud dries out enough to cross to the field without bogging down. 33" span a bit over 2 sq feet of area. Weighs just over 16 ounces This view shows the battery location This shows the ESC mounting.Plenty of cooling there The control set up is simple and possibly crude but it works. Power train is one of the £25 complete packages from4 Max Yellow panels are simply covering film covering the access to the Rx and satellite rx Hey, I managed to set out the pictures properly!!
    3 points
  42. The scale underside bits. All made in 5 mm XPS. The "Sabrinas" are surprisingly big but then each had to hold 300 30mm cartridge cases. The underside air brake looks (and was) a bit of an afterthought literally mounted on the fuselage underside. It obviously worked well enough as it was never changed in all the 1900+ Hunters that were built. Still waiting for the paint!
    3 points
  43. Another good session today on the A-10... The recently glassed nose section was cut back with medium paper and has had 2 good coats of filler primer with a focussed sanding in-between after a 24hr wait for it to fully harden. Surface is looking pretty good, just a few low spots still to address... In between waiting for the primer to harden each time round I've done a bit more glassing - tailplane lower surface this time and I've added some resin to the lite-ply end caps on the elevators and rudders - areas that dont naturally receive glass but still need to be painted. I'll soon have all these parts in primer too now I hope.
    3 points
  44. A good turnout yesterday for the traditional New Years eve fly-in at my club near Keszthely western Hungary, blue skies and 14C degrees! I enjoyed some excellent soaring with my Multiplex Heron in zero wind conditions. We also enjoyed some aircraft themed gingerbread:
    3 points
  45. Success at the front end revealed a new shortcoming - the low waistline of the design. This was making it impossible to blend the cylinder head fairings into the fuselage. The route I took was to pre-shape some really soft 1/8" balsa into approximately the right curve (good thing I have glue bottles of all sizes), stick it on, and sand, sand, sand. And fill... and sand... etc. The happy/easy part of the progress shown in these pictures is the battery hatch, which is cut along the inside edge of the cylinder head fairings, and perfectly aligns with the shut lines cannon access cover on the prototype (I hope...). Of course it came with its own complication, that formers F5/F6 didn't align with the end of the hatch cut - but who cares, the skin is holding its new shape and the formers aren't strictly required (they will likely return "in some form" when time comes to figure out how to secure the hatch).
    3 points
  46. Sorry the image isn't as sharp as normal the GoPro couldn't cope with the close-ups. Cheers Danny
    3 points
  47. Had what felt like a full day of it yesterday..... At the field in the morning. Flew my EFlite PT17, which I am now actually starting to like, 3 years on; my Alt DLG and my Saito powered Valiant, now I finally have a replacement hatch. Just me, the birds, and worms. Only picture I have is of the worm casts stuck to my PT17 wheels. Spent a couple of hours indoor flying with a few club mates. Flew my Banggood Black Flyer and my Blade heli; 7 of us flying - just enough to ensure plenty of air time and a small profit on hall-hire. Then, in the evening, our last 2021 'Noggin and Natter' in the pub, talking random nonsense. A good day! Collecting Xmas food today, which will be far less relaxing.......
    3 points
  48. G-DAVE ( as it’s now officially called, named after the last owner) is back from paint. Anthony has done his magic. It’s high gloss diamond white 2k. It’s only cost me 12 Stella and a Tamiya Grasshopper build. Good value for money I reckon. The blue pin striping is going to be done in the New Year. Have done lots of little, fiddly jobs. Tank install, tidy the wiring.....you know the drill. Must order some new acetate sheet and double sided sticky tape for the windows.
    3 points
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