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  1. A perfect afternoon and Stuart Pickett brought up two models models. These came from Peter Taylor's estate The Flight LIne B-24 Liberator which flew like a dream ad the Dynam Gloster Meteor with the up grade 12 blade fans
    14 points
  2. So a pleasant evening setting up the radio, and all is good. C of G is about right with 1500mAh 2S LiFe Rx pack balanced on the cowl so should be good. AUW ready to fly, minus fuel. 4.38kg or 9.66lbs Pretty pleased with that......means the model is eligible for light scale Cheers Danny
    12 points
  3. After starting the Stampe blog 10 years ago (!), and being a team member of the DB Giant Mannock build, I thought it would be a great time to start another topic. Since I lost my much loved 4 engine scratch built I was at a loss. Then I saw that TN Design had a Lancaster suitable for 4 x .40 size engines, not too large at 134” span....Great! Having spoken to my build mate Brian, he’s up for it! The Savox servos, new Futaba Rx and full kit will be purchased over the next few days/ weeks. I’ll post as often as I can. Tony Nijhuis with the 134” Lancaster
    10 points
  4. Meanwhile... at the pure FF diesel end of things, I recently finished my 23.5" Gordon Whitehead Nieuport Baby, built from an original 1972 Aeromodeller plan. It was supposed to be powered by a 1959 E.D. Baby 0.46cc which I acquired completely gummed up, but stripping and cleaning it then putting it back together revealed an engine that had actually had very little prior use: I've now run it in properly (the exhaust residue has gone from dark-grey to light-straw probably for the first time in over 60 years!) and it is very sweet upright. However, for reasons I've not been able to fathom, it has proved almost impossible to start inverted. So I've now retrofitted an equally old but invertible Allbon Dart 0.5cc into the Nieuport. First flights were impressively high and sometimes manic, as the old Dart is still a bit too powerful. So this video of the last trim flight of the day, with the 7x3 prop mounted on backwards to help kill the excess thrust (even at lower, burbling revs) shows the model closer to an acceptable state of trim: https://photos.app.goo.gl/VaV26H5e5pqUfFiC9 The glide is steep because (1) it is obviously a very draggy WW1 biplane, (2) it is a bit heavy for its small size, and (3) I had to bend in down-elevator trim to overcome the previous ballooning climb. I've now fitted an 8x3 prop, as the 'flywheel effect' of this larger prop better helps keep the engine running at lower compression settings, and I'll also increase the down-thrust from 7° to 8° and the right-thrust from 4.5° to 5.5° to tame the excessive bank and climb at anything above minimal revs (sounds mad but in my experience this type of very short-nosed FF model really needs that much of both!). Then I'll be able to restore the tad of down-elevator trim to neutral to improve the glide-phase angle, bend in more left rudder and re-tweak the already bent-in differential washout... the aim being to achieve a consistent left-hand circuit on both power and glide phases (it currently turns right once the power cuts) without the model rolling in one way or the other, etc. Complicated stuff this FF malarkey...
    9 points
  5. I’m responding by ignoring pointless speculation, pessimists, doom mongers and those that look to the past with rose tinted spectacles. Rather I rejoice at still being able to partake in this wonderful pastime & enjoy the ever increasing quantity & quality of products that are available from all around the globe. …and I look forward to my next flying session and the sheer joy I experience when flying my models.
    9 points
  6. Similar experience here - we have attended several local fetes, sometimes flying, sometimes static only. A number of people stop for chats but not one has taken up our offer of some free 'tasters'. Typically, we get new members from our web (thanks BMFA!) and Facebook presence. Regarding age, the vast majority of our members are retired; some are 'returnees', some are new to the hobby, some are life long modellers. We have a few juniors who are reliant in parents; a couple come with their father who also flies so are seen quite regularly; one is brought by his father whenever that's possible - a less regular attendee. Over the four years I have been part of the club, membership has remained pretty stable, despite a number of members leaving for various reasons. We do have a club trainer that our chairman maintains, and he does most of the training, although most of the regular fliers are more than happy to help on a buddy box, or be on hand for less experienced pilots if they need to be 'talked through' things. "This will be the death of the hobby" has seemingly been an oft-uttered phrase since I started in the 70s. Nowadays, whilst equipment is much more sophisticated, and packages that almost guarantee success are readily available, flying sites seem to be less and less available - especially for any ic power. Unlike most clubs (I think) the number of ic powered craft is actually increasing! As ever, the hobby is evolving. Am I complacent? No. Am I alarmed? No. Just aware that we need to make sure that ANY & ALL contact with prospective new members is positive, and that the field is always a harmonious and welcoming place for our members. Obviously as people are different, we're not 100% successful! But pretty much so....
    8 points
  7. 1. I have run an at least once weekly often twice weekly after school RC club for approaching 20 years. (I'm 74) This includes sessions at school and at my local model flying club. I therefore promote and allow 11-18 year olds to get hands on experience of Fixed Wing, Helicopters, Hovercraft, and Freestyle Multicopters. Parents WILL happily do the taxi runs to and from the field or school, but as for sitting there bored for a couple of hours, well, no. The Friends of the School support bigger purchases to some degree financially, for example computerised timing gear for Car and now Hovercraft racing (these are converted from multicopters and built and maintained by boys in school workshops) . I do not charge for any sessions, and most of the field flying gear is being provided at my expense, or less from donations (often from modellers who have passed away). Recently a person in the USA sent me a donation of an FPV headset and parts at his expense inc shipping when he learned what I was doing!! I have in the last couple of years brought boys into the RC flying world initially by the Freestyle Multicopter (and FPV Multicopter) route, but their interest then ALWAYS widens into the other forms of RC flying once they see and experience it. (and that includes building balsa and correx free flight gliders, no less!!) SO, don't tell ME there's no interest, or that DRONES are killing the sport/hobby, been there, its not true! 2. IN the Multicopter world, from about halfway through the worst of the pandemic, components for individual purchase got so difficult and so expensive that home building became more expensive than buying from a PNP/BNF business getting the benefit of buying parts and building (say) a thousand or more at once. Also true for Helicopters, too. Its still that way and no sign of supply chains improving. ARTF fixed wing like the HK Bixler2, Wot4 Foam-E, etc are still cheaper and more durable than making from scratch, and yes, this is from direct long term experience. Does not mean that NO traditional modelling ever takes place, but you do have to enthuse, and weeks of workshop building is NOT the initial best route. 3. Stop whinging and stalling and GET INVOLVED, you probably all have Hangars of suitable stuff simply laying there you never use, so even if you are not prepared to actually stand up and donate your TIME, you could find someone interested and prepared to take it on and try.
    8 points
  8. Getting youngsters into the hobby has always been a challenge. The cost of the necessary equipment has traditionally been prohibitive for many - although it is arguably cheaper now in real terms than it was 50 years ago - and any keen youngsters will probably need the financial backing of their parents or, more likely, their grandparents. In addition to to the monetary support, a junior also needs the commitment of a parent to transport them to and from the flying field. . . It seems that modern youngsters can't go anywhere nowadays without a "helicopter" parent hovering close by. . Regrettably, many parents are not keen to give this level of commitment. So unless our keen youngster is the offspring of an existing model flyer, they will struggle to get involved. However, we can keep giving goes to the kids..... and they are always keen to have a go. Hopefully their experiences of having a go will plant a seed which will grow and might, one day, evolve into participation in the hobby/sport. We keep plugging away.....
    8 points
  9. My favourite 'hack' (a description which does it a dis-service). I think the updated wingtips are ugly - and the canopy has always been, so I did some mods...
    8 points
  10. 8 points
  11. Here is (some considerable time later!!!) The end result of all that filling and rubbing down, not yet flown but will be very soon
    8 points
  12. Rodeo complete. Back in time for tea and biscuits
    8 points
  13. This is my Twister design, built a while back with a few modifications along the way, now flying like it should.
    7 points
  14. It's a five minute walk from my house to the pub, but it's a 35 minute walk from the pub to my house.The difference is staggering.
    7 points
  15. What’s the correct way to address a media studies graduate? ”I’d like large fries with that”.
    7 points
  16. If you put your model aeroplane on the ground where cars are parked (a car park) even for a moment, sooner or later you can expect it to be run over by a car. I think a motor insurance company would find someone making a claim for damage to personal property under these circumstances hilarious and reject any liability. People are expected to take reasonable care of their possessions. The club chairman should make clear the committee’s position that his behaviour is unacceptable and that he must put it down to experience and get over it, or move on. No if’s or buts.
    7 points
  17. 7 points
  18. At long last, and after some horrible luck with a flap servo wire that caught fire last year on an attempted maiden, she has at last felt air under her wings. Two great launches by a hardy crew of PSS'ers on the Orme yesterday in a fantastic 55mph SW blow into the big bowl. A great big pussycat to fly of course! Photo's by our fearless leader Phil Cooke as always.
    7 points
  19. Nope stop you leaving when you see the entry prices for repetitive Chinese build rtf 3m extra hovering planes and little else
    7 points
  20. Well the not to distant was today. Sadly I had to cut my flying time down to this morning only, but before I left..... I shall go through the rest in a few days. This one straight from the camera, zero editing.
    7 points
  21. The latest build from my workshop, a take on the Mini Skyman from a Bowman’s model kits plan. We’ve made a few changes to the original for starts the Cox049 has been replaced with a home brew brushless motor hidden under a resins printed dummy 049. The other change is I’ve added ailerons to the main wing and reduced the dihedral. So apart from the battery hatch the rest of the model is built to the plan. Being a model from the 80’s it needed an 80’s scheme, which hopefully works. All that’s needed now is for the wind to play ball, and we will see if the 60W from my old motor will cut the mustard.
    6 points
  22. A few shots of my Flair Magnatilla on her maiden flight a couple of weeks ago. I'd fitted the jokey German pilot with a high backed wickerwork seat, sitting high up in the slipstream, but I really don't like how that looks. He'll be treated to some body reduction surgery very soon and have a much more comfortable position. Photo credits Derek Robertson. Thanks Derek!.
    6 points
  23. We held our "Journée Découverte de lAeromodelisme" or Aeromodelling Discovery Day yesterday. We had targeted the local colleges. Nobody turned up except a local baker who used to fly in the Eighties and had somehow found out about us. Mind you it rained for much of the day. I have long since concluded that traditional aeromodelling has no appeal for the younger generation which is why so many of my club members are in their sixties or older. Over the last few years, my club has increased its membership but most new members are retired beginners or people like the baker returning to the hobby. We apparently have a good reputation for encouraging these new members because several have chosen to join us rather than to join clubs which are nearer to their homes. I believe that we have about thirty-five members in the club; one is in his thirties, and two are in their forties, the rest are older. We used to have a couple of lads who were still at school and who learned to fly in five minutes but they don't come anymore. One of them is my neighbour. He prefers to help his sister with her mobile catering business or to go carp fishing with his grandfather. When I was a teenager I don't think that spending my leisure time with a lot of old men would have appealed very much either. As for the availability of modelling product, there are a lot electric powered foamies available. I've owned a few but I've worn them out, read crashed them after lots of flights, and I've never bothered to replace them. Similarly I have custody of a Boomerang ARTF trainer which belongs to the club and I own an ARTF Acro Wot. I assembled both of these but they don't give me the same satisfaction as building a model from scratch. I am currently building a DB Sport & Scale Skyrider as a surprise present for my partner who has challenged me to finish a model in purple and pink! I get a great deal of pleasure in seeing it take shape. I also gain a great deal of satisfaction out of getting a glow engine running perfectly. I prefer the challenge of the glow engine to the reliability and cleanliness of the electric motor, but I've always been in one minority or another all my life. The young have other interests and probably have to work hard to attain an acceptable standard in their SAT Tests at school if that's what they're still called. The world of work appears to be more demanding and less rewarding for most people these days so people may not have the leisure time to devote to aeromodelling. Then there's the cost of starting the hobby for newcomers... The way I see it is that at seventy-four and in good health, I have five to ten years of active life left, if I'm lucky. As long as I have stocks of balsa I will carry on being the curmudgeonly traditional modeller, let the world of aeromodelling change as it may!
    6 points
  24. Share of some flight video the Mrs filmed.
    6 points
  25. Maiden day for the 2022 mass built Mini Super, light winds and sunshine. This is the before picture and the after picture is the same Steve
    6 points
  26. Spent yesterday morning flying the Warbirds Replicas Ju88 till I run out of batteries, after lunch from 2pm to 6pm flew a Kyosho Spitfire IC powered made the most of it as today the car is in dock for up dating
    6 points
  27. 6 points
  28. A few photos here from our most recent weekends flying upon the Great Orme 28th/29th May. https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72177720299519645
    6 points
  29. My club (Maidstone), christened its new field on Thursday with a pilot briefing and noise testing, a little flying too.
    6 points
  30. Assembled! finished apart from control horns. Next pictures will be at the field Steve
    6 points
  31. Back in 2010 I was waiting for the Windrider 737 to arrive, and since it took some time I started another build. The McDonnel Douglas MD-83 was based on drawings from scale-parkflyer.de. Back then I got it nearly finished (95%) and then the 737 showed up - and the project has been stored ever since. The 737 is long gone, so it was time to finish the MD-83 project and fly it! Plans where from www.scale-parkflyer.de (now also availible with a precut depron piece set) and the specs are as follows: Wingspan: 1300 mm (51") Fuse length: 1670 mm (65") RTF weight: 1250 grams (39oz) Power: Two55 mm brushless EDFs Here are a cople of shots from the first meeting in the season (yes, it is a frozen lake!) The development within the field of EDF has come a long way over the last 12 years, but I opted for keeping the old fans - and it actually works, not too much power, but enoug to get of the ground (ice) and do well in the air. It need some speed, the wings are not big at all! Enjoy video and pictures! Drone video of the maiden flight: Video of the second flight:
    6 points
  32. A photo compilation of our club even over the weekend 24-26 June.
    5 points
  33. Well , not so much a make-over as a build with a modified paint scheme. I recently picked up an unstarted Seagull Sea Fury kit from a modeller who was giving up. Obviously these kits have been out of production for quite a while, and the kit is not quite up to current standards. For example, it has no electric provision (mounts / battery space etc) and no removable top hatch. Danny F and others have some time back detailed modifications for electric and demonstrated that the model can be redone in other paint schemes. So far I have fitted some HK electric retracts and oleos in place of the supplied mechanical units with wire legs. I have increased the wheel wells to take proper size wheels (3.5"). And repainted the model to disguise the pretty boring and unconvincing film finish it came with. I have decided on a Dutch naval scheme and am modelling 860which was part of the 1959 Dutch Naval aerobatic team that used Sea Furies. I feel its a much nicer scheme than the Canadian racing colours supplied as standard. Eagled eyed will see I have the cowl on upside down 098 instead of 860!
    5 points
  34. Anyone who knows the "cantankerous old man" this post refers to will be laughing out loud at this comment! Brian has enthusiastically promoted model flying to young (and old) people for decades and although he sports less hair and what remains is somewhat greyer, his attitude to flying - and life in general - hasn't changed much since he taught me to fly models the best part of 50 years ago.
    5 points
  35. Despite our best efforts in that regard I've long thought that expectations of a mass influx of youngsters taking up the hobby was bound to be doomed to disappointment. The lone youngster coming into the hobby is met with a fundamental issue, given the relocation of the remaining model flying fields to out of town locations, which makes transport of one's gear to the field a bit difficult if one doesn't drive or have ready access to transport. If there's a better lad and dad hobby I haven't seen it and that is a way of attracting new blood, but for the lone youngster it's hard. The days of biking a couple of miles with a wee glider on the back of your bike are almost over. The immediate future of the hobby, if there is one, is more likely to be in attracting retirees who dabbled a bit in their youth, often with very little success, then discovered beer, girls and motor vehicles. A lifetime of busy work and family makes it tricky to spare the time and cost for modelling. In retirement though, the vastly improved kit which is available across the board gives these chaps a much better chance of success and, for the silver surfer, there has never been such a wealth of help and information at their fingertips. My own clubs have seen a steady stream of returners and new recruits to the hobby, to replace some of those friends and fellow modellers that we have sadly lost. I think that is marvellous and the chances of success for those returners and new flyers are hugely improved by the technology, with vastly more efficient use of their limited time than was available 30 years ago. The traditional methods of spending three months building a trainer, then crashing and repairing it on a weekly basis whilst getting to grips with the flying side never were a golden age and they have been replaced, or supplemented, with other, better, options. Personally I'm hugely enjoying my hobby at the moment, have made lots of new pals since moving to Scotland a decade ago. I'm still a bit time limited, due to working full time, and my daily commute, replacing what was a weekly commute, does eat into the possibilities for evening flying, which I used to love. However the opportunities for the weekends are much better, the kit mountain awaits my retirement and I'm optimistic for the future.
    5 points
  36. I began flying R/C when I was a kid and have been into the hobby for 60 years. It seems I just forgot to grow out of it. Yes, the hobby/sport has changed, but I prefer to call it "evolved". The advances in technology have been fabulous to behold. Personally, I simply look forward to my next flying session rather than lament the so-called "good old days". The equipment we have now surpasses anything we could have imagined 60 years ago, and it just becomes more fun as time goes by. I have been involved in introducing the game to youngsters. . Their enthusiasm to have a go remains the same, BUT in the past many were keen enough to take up the hobby. Today's youngsters can't be bothered to invest the time to learn the skills required to fly a model. They would rather keep their noses pointed at a mobile phone. I stop at red lights and also have respect for pedestrians. Plus, I laugh at the sight of people dressed in lycra, so I probably wouldn't be allowed to get involved in cycling. That means I shall carry on being a model flyer. . . . Could be a title for a film, eh.
    5 points
  37. And the two protagonists .
    5 points
  38. It doesn't really sound like this is anything to do with the club. This sounds like two rather immature individuals who are too egotistical to come to terms. The club's main interest should be ensuring that this private issue doesn't sour the atmosphere for others. If that can't happen and their continued membership is likely to be detrimental to the club, then they have to leave. Would be a lot easier if they just estimate costs for repair and split the bill 50/50 as both were probably at fault. But perhaps that's too much like common sense for these boys.
    5 points
  39. Flying my 19.2lb H9 Spitfire, yesterday - Laser 180 using Laser 5% low oil fuel and an 18x8 G-Sonic prop. Four excellent flights with plenty of scale aerobatics - thoroughly enjoyable. My YT 82" Hurricane weighs in at 19lbs and also has a Laser 180, also good to fly scale aerobatics but not quite as sprightly. Just remember to keep the speed up, full power when doing aerobatics but ok on lower throttle for fly-bys and show-offs! Steve.
    5 points
  40. It’s been too long that my Mannock has had no fighting colours....so I remedied that. Paint masks by Flightline Graphics, Guild fuel proof spray paints. Just the wings to go
    5 points
  41. My Gyroo which is still to be test hoped and trimmed. The head is an old HKC30 I bought to build a Crane Fly which never happened - so it's taken a good few years to get into Autogyro's
    5 points
  42. I had a much better day at the club field yesterday, sunny, warm, light winds and some D-Day anniversary warbird flying - particularly enjoyable was the loose formation flying and beating up the field in a Spitfire three ship gaggle. Great fun. The it was the D-Day anniversary today, so loaded up the car with invasion-stripe clad aeroplanes and made an early start. The weather at dawn was magnificent, but a few hours later had clouded over and the trip over the hills was down to 20 yards visibility in places and cold. Undeterred I got to the field and unloaded the themed fleet. During the afternoon it got sunnier and warmer and conditions were good for flying.As the day went on I flew every one of these models at least once and had a great day, including a successful couple of flights with my CML Douglas C-47 Dakota. It flew quite nicely, but I had the impression that slowing her up too much she would love to drop a wing. All in all another great day, with good company and good flying. C-47 and SEMFF P-51D photo credits Derek Robertson
    5 points
  43. Continued with bits I had been mulling over for some time. The steps are quite large afairs and I was struggling to get them right. The first attempt, which involved soldering etc went in the bin. When I looked more closely at the full size I saw that the steps attach to the strut bracket, so I drilled at 45 degrees aft and 45 degrees outboard, the base of the struts, the assemblies were then fed through and CA'd into place. I can alter the angles slightly once the model is assembled to check they "sit" right. I have subsequently painted the brass airfoil sections silver. The underlying structure is aluminium tube. Cheers Danny
    5 points
  44. Wife: My hands are covered in blisters from using this broom! Husband: Well take the car next time!
    5 points
  45. I do not know the back history of these two but as i mentioned before i think throwing them out must really be held as a last resort. For some reason clubs default to this idea of throwing people out immediately when there is a problem of any kind. If these two hate each other but its not impacting anyone else just leave them to it. If it is really destabilising the whole club, which i have to think is unlikely as i would assume the other members just roll their eyes with boredom, then i assume there is a constitutional procedure within the club which needs to be followed. If it was anything like my old club you got written warnings, then a short suspension, then a longer one, and then if you still didnt get it you were out. You cant just throw them out immediately for what is at face value a first offence and will likely blow over in time anyway. There will always be disagreements but the threat of dismissing a member should be reserved for the most serious of situations.
    4 points
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