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New Issue CAA Operator Number


Capt Kremen
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Just received the mouthful that is the new CAA Operator Number. Went to update the BMFA Membership details, seems it will not permit this yet until current expires (21/02/21). 

Argh well .... time to get a new cartridge in the Dymo, it will need it for all the new 19 characters long labels needing printing!

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I just printed 30 copies of my new OP ID on a sheet of ink jet compatible clear self adhesive vinyl. Once I have sprayed it with clear lacquer for protection it will be easy to add it to my models as and when I fly them.

I believe the BMFA Membership site will be updated automatically as the new OP IDs are issued, so will wait a day or two before I worry about that.

Dick

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1 hour ago, Capt Kremen said:

Went to update the BMFA Membership details, seems it will not permit this yet until current expires

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I've just received an email from the BMFA confirming the CAA registration details, so it looks like they've updated the details automatically.

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9 minutes ago, John T said:

I've just received an email from the BMFA confirming the CAA registration details, so it looks like they've updated the details automatically.

Same here, and I have just checked the membership site and confirmed that the new OP ID and expiry date are on there correctly.

Looks like the system is now working fine.

Dick

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The new improved system should mean you receive an email with the Operator ID details direct from the CAA and then a further one when the details are updated on the BMFA membership system.  The backlog will all be processed over the next week then there will be daily automatic uploads with Operator IDs issued over night. A much better system.

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I have now received my new operator number from the CAA. Neglecting the GB-OP- bit which is self explanatory, it appears to consist of 12 randomly selected letters and numbers.

Assuming that I=J - something commonly done with registration details to avoid confusion - that gives us 25 letters and 10 numbers.

The total number of possible permutations of 12 selected from 35 (and allowing repetition) gives us

3,379,220,508,056,640,625

possible registration numbers!

In 2020, the total global population was estimated at 7,800,000,000 (7.8 Billion)

Is the CAA seriously suggesting that it is expecting everyone alive on planet earth today to register 433,233,398.469 (approx 433 million!) drones apiece with the CAA?

I think we should be told!

--

Pete

 

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The length of the ID is ridiculous, especially as I presume they all start with GBR-OP- so the the first 7 characters are totally superfluous.

Has anyone worked out the minimum point size in Arial, Arial Narrow, or Calibri fonts to comply with the 3mm minimum character height?

(There is no mention of minimum character width or of a particular font required so ..... ?)

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From AG - "Except the ID a European-wide format so the country of origin (IE GBR) IS NOT superfluous!"

Sorry Alan but I cannot agree - as far as needing to display it on models it IS superfluous if you never fly your models outside UK, so in my opinion, for flying in the UK it should not be necessary to display the prefix on models.

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It IS necessary to comply with the law.  Whether it's good law or bad law is immaterial.

As the UK has decided to stay within the EASA "umbrella" for probably sound operational reasons, one of the consequences is abiding by the EASA format.  The CAA has no power to grant any variation from the European numbering scheme.

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We will have to agree to disagree. 

I am not disputing that it is the law, and obviously I will comply.  If anyone were to take a UK registered model abroad (within EU) without displaying the prefix, obviously they would be in breach of EASA law and liable to prosecution.  However in my view that does not make it any more reasonable to have to display the GBR-OP- prefix on models flown only in the UK (or for that matter having to display the national prefix on any model flown withing the boundaries of the country of registration).

As I say, I know it is the law and will comply, but in a (relatively) free country I still have the right to think it's stupid.

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27 minutes ago, Cassandra said:

People keep making this claim. Somebody on Facebook referenced this EASA means of compliance document in response to a similar comment saying that the the UK is not following it and it certainly looks like they aren't.

https://www.easa.europa.eu/sites/default/files/dfu/amc_gm_to_commission_implementing_regulation_eu_2019-947_-_issue_1_amendment_1.pdf

<back to lurking>

I won’t claim to have read all that or understood it - thankfully the CAA has given us their more easily understood interpretation!

However, if I understand the point you were trying to make, it seems that the format is 16 digits plus a 3 digit checksum so I imagine that the UK format is compliant.

 

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Considering that full-size aircraft use a quickly and easily read four letter registration (admittedly preceded by a country code), I find it ridiculous that a drone of any kind should need such a long registration.

What are the chances of the Plod copying it down correctly if he does come across the remains of a drone?

Ah, silly me! Its all to do with electronic conspicuity, isn't it? As if my tiny, 40 year old single channel model would be capable of carrying or powering such  device....

--

Pete

 

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1 hour ago, leccyflyer said:

Quick question for clarification - does a Flyer number have an F-prefix, the same as an Operator number has an OP-prefix?

The powers that be don;t seem to be very efficient in choosing to use a 19 digit character string.

My Flyer ID is in the format  FLY-AB1C23  and is valid for a couple more years.

Dick

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