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Jimstab
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Can anyone recommend a brand of kit please that has good quality parts and above all else easy to follow instructions? I don’t mind paying that but extra for a quality kit. I’ve put together numerous ARTF  models but have not a great deal of luck with previous attempts at building from a kit. Any pointers appreciated 

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Traditional Balsa+Ply Kit selection - SLEC 'SKY40' - (Build Video on YouTube), D.B. Sport & Scale 'Mascot', Galaxy Models 'Fiesta 4', Ripmax/Chris Foss ARTF 'WOT Trainer', Seagull Models Kit or ARTF 'Boomerang II', The Vintage Model Co. 'Cub' - (Build Video On YouTube). Most if not ALL of these have been around a long time and there's a reason, they fit the bill, are well tried & proven designs. If you prefer a Plan build from scratch, again so many to choose from depending on skill level, aptitude e,g. a vintage design such as Keil-Kraft 'Junior 60', many Dave Boddington designs such as 'Ghost Rider', 'SkyRider', 'Tyro' etc. etc.

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Hi, I have currently an Acrowot and a Weston Cougar which I fly regularly but also have a few scale models. I’ve struggled in the past with kits that have had only written instructions or none at all and would probably fair better with a set of pictorial instructions maybe.

 

I’ve been looking at the Sig Piper J3 kit as I like the look of that type of plane.

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Can’t knock a SIG kit. Good quality.
I accept some instructions just don’t suit the user.

I made some apricot chutney today, noted cook’s recipe. By the time he had finished, I concluded he was drunk, and had been reading romantic poetry. Nothing really wrong, but just difficult to translate to reality. ie, something sticky sharp and sweet to go with a pork terrine. 
Not a lot of difference, plane or chutney. You need to know what is needed, or have instructions that suit you.

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I built a SLEC Fun Fly some time ago. It's easy to build and it flies well but I found the instructions for fitting the "cockpit" to the rest of the model difficult to understand. In the end I used dowel and velcro.

 

PS. The help of an experienced builder will be invaluable.

 

Fun Fly Apres Maiden. (Small).JPG

Edited by David Davis
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Agree totally on the SLEC Fun Fly.  Very easy to build and parts very well cut.  Extremely good value for money and with choice of powerplant IC or electric.  Good all round model and hack.  This one is powered by an older ASP46 and was built in 2020 lockdown.  Hardest part... deciding on the colour scheme.

LPP

1729489731_LockBeaLady3.thumb.jpeg.beceee351fc2272b0c19e72581b523b9.jpeg

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Although currently out of stock take a look at the DB Sport and scale cub. 84 inches sounds huge but its really not for a cub and a 70 4 stroke would be more than enough. Its laser cut so the parts are accurate, full plans and the manufacturer is in the uk so you can ask a question. They cant build it for you, but if you get really stuck and you cannot find help here on the forum then i am sure they will do what they can. 

 

One thing to consider however is that cubs are not what most people expect them to be. Most seem to think cubs are easy to fly arrow straight and super stable...this is not exactly true as they are scale models and require the use of coordinated rudder (by hand, not mixed as you need to cross control very often), are buffeted around a fair bit due to their light loading and have fairly slow ailerons. Its not difficult to adapt to this, but it will take practice and a willingness to learn. A chap at my club claimed his cub 'just didnt fly' but i flew it and had a great time. I tried to teach him but his mind was made up and he wasnt interested. They also do not like being over powered so use the smaller engines in the recommended ranges for either model. 

 

Anyway i am not trying to put you off a cub, in fact building either the sig or DB cub could be a superb learning tool both when it comes to building and flying, its just a case of knowing what it is you are getting into. 

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Echoing comments re SIG kits.  Good quality but real 'old school' (cut your own pieces of ply!) and poor instructions that leave a lot of interpretation needed.  My Smith Miniplane instructions have a section relating to the top wing that would be impossible to follow.

 

If you go SIG, see if the instructions are on the SIG site as they're the most up to date............. and set an extra budget for wheels, tank, engine mount (other power options are available).

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On 18/12/2021 at 21:05, Jimstab said:

 

I’ve been looking at the Sig Piper J3 kit as I like the look of that type of plane.

 Keep an eye out for the old Carl Goldberg Cub kit on Ebay/BMFA/RCM&E classifieds, I doubt you will find one in the shops. It seems to tick all your boxes, a copy of the assembly instructions is attached and as you can see it is exemplary and leaves nothing to your imagination

 

gpma0963-manual.pdf

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Jimstab,

 

I am slightly reading between the lines here, but I suspect what you really need here is a companion who builds models who can help and guide when you get stuck or are not too sure what is meant in the instructions.

 

Once you have built a few models (not assembled - there is a huge difference) you can interpret "Chinglish" or build with no guide other than a plan.

 

Do you belong to a club, if so ask around to see if someone will mentor you on your next machine build whatever you decide on?

If not, ask at your local model shop (if you have one) to see if they know of a local model plane builder who may be willing to help.

If everything else fails, find an online mentor. Make sure you can take good photos and post them via e-mail or a forum to your mentor. Be prepared to have some longish phone conversations too, as that will help clear any ambiguities better than a text conversation.

A little idea of the region you live in may help the latter search if you go in that direction.

 

I wish you the very best of luck with whatever project you take on.

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How about a Chris Foss WOT 4 Almost Ready To Build?  If Jim can handle an ARTF Acrowot he should have no problem flying an WOT 4. I'll confess that I've never built a WOT 4, though one has been waiting in its box on my shelves since I paid £60 for it on eBay many years ago. However, a Uno Wot, another contender, was my first aileron model. I thought that the instructions in the kit were pretty good though I don't recall there being any photographs.

 

I agree with Andy Gates that having the assistance of an experienced builder makes a great deal of difference.

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  • 1 month later...

Thanks to Cloud Models & others before, the Crescent Bullet is still available as a traditional kit.
Shaping the fuselage curves with razor plane & sanding block is a very satisfying building experience.
Reviewed as one of the easiest kits to build - it has pitfalls for the inexperienced but builds into a super model.

All the best.

 

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