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Weston UK Fuel


Martin Arnold 1
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Hi guys.

With the possible demise of my favourite Model Technics Dynaglow fuel, I have often looked at the Weston UK Prosynth 2000 and Liquid Gold fuels.

Has anyone had any experience of this stuff and happen to know the oil type and content, I seem to recall they are a bit reluctant to divulge such information ?

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I have used their fuel in their engines but must say that the fuel does tend to froth up quite a bit (I don't know why!) and I've not been able to get any information on the oil type or content. Having said that, their engines perform absolutely fine on the fuel but, as I don't know the make up, I won't use it in my Laser engines.

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9 hours ago, Ron Gray said:

I have used their fuel in their engines but must say that the fuel does tend to froth up quite a bit (I don't know why!) and I've not been able to get any information on the oil type or content. Having said that, their engines perform absolutely fine on the fuel but, as I don't know the make up, I won't use it in my Laser engines.

Generally concurred that it was Fuchs Aero Save oil, one of the best brands of oil out their, Its far better and is more modern than the fish shop oil ML70,If your using ML70 than I certainly wouldn't be bothered by using Weston UK fuels, Weston's fuel is used all over Europe and is the one fuel I know works when I travel to Spain and Portugal and it 42 degrees outside, Strangely they've never heard of ML70🤣

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Waston fuel's are not compliant with the Laser warranty spec and i will not support any warranty claim on our engines if that fuel has been used. It always causes arguments when i say that and i have explained it many times before. The fact of the matter is we arent satisfied with its quality or performance and dont recommend it. 

 

As for ML70, i really have never understood the hate it receives. It seems to be considered the red headed step child of oils and i have no idea why. Perhaps you can enlighten us Jason? What specifically makes it so bad? On the subject of fuchs oils many of my customers in Germany have used different ones they make and some of their oils do not work well in model engines. Even the best brands of oil can produce products not suited to a given application so just to say its from fuchs so must be good is a rather ridiculous...especially when we are not sure if that is actually what they are using. 

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11 hours ago, Martin Arnold 1 said:

Hi guys.

With the possible demise of my favourite Model Technics Dynaglow fuel, I have often looked at the Weston UK Prosynth 2000 and Liquid Gold fuels.

Has anyone had any experience of this stuff and happen to know the oil type and content, I seem to recall they are a bit reluctant to divulge such information ?

I bought a gallon of Prosynth 2000 a few years ago as it was either that or have no fuel to go flying at the time. As the oil content is secret for some inexplicable reason, I measured out a small quantity and allowed the methanol to evaporate over a few days - what residual oil that was left was measured, I'd say that its % was somewhere around 16 - 18%. As to to the type of oil, other than what was left being very viscous and rather like light coloured treacle in appearance, I've no idea. Not an exact science, but give  it a try and check for yourself.

The fuel ran ok but I noticed an odd cream cheese like residue forming in the carburettors of my models that made starting difficult if a model hadn't been used for a few days. Once cleared out the motors would run fine and reliably. Whether the stuff blocking the carb jets was some reaction of the new fuel to the older stuff I don't know, but once I used up the Prosynth and went back to my usual Laser mix, the cream cheese and starting problems disappeared. Very odd.

Edited by Cuban8
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I have not seen that cream cheese issue as you describe it but i have found a chalky/crumbly white residue in carbs, inlets and on piston crowns on engines returned after running this fuel. It makes a right mess inside the engine and often jams the valves open. 

 

Its strange as the description you give is almost like water emulsion, like when the head gasket leaks on a car and the oil turns to mayonnaise. Perhaps it will dry out over time and turn into this powdery stuff? 

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11 hours ago, Chris Walby said:

Surely if a product is make then it has to have a COSHH data sheet? I am not a chemist, but does this not tell you the ingredients? 

e.g.

image.thumb.png.a7bd6f73f5c076327e4ba5f11785d0a2.png

 

PS - Sorry Jon for mentioning castor, I shall repent by flying only IC today on Laser 5 ....😉

Interesting comment.

As far as I am aware it is a legal requirement for a seller to supply a coshh data sheet when selling items covered by the regulations if requested.

However it is not necessary to have the component manufacturers details on there. Just its chemical composition. Oils would be described as "vegetable", or "mineral". I don't think that proportions have to be on there either, just the components (particularly the nasties).

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On 15/01/2022 at 09:23, Jon - Laser Engines said:

I have not seen that cream cheese issue as you describe it but i have found a chalky/crumbly white residue in carbs, inlets and on piston crowns on engines returned after running this fuel. It makes a right mess inside the engine and often jams the valves open. 

 

Its strange as the description you give is almost like water emulsion, like when the head gasket leaks on a car and the oil turns to mayonnaise. Perhaps it will dry out over time and turn into this powdery stuff? 

Yes, an odd situation because although I only ran a gallon of Prosynth through my fleet, once running they all  performed  well. Thinking back, the residue that looked as though  the carb needle point had been pushed into Dairylea Cheese wasn't apparent at the end of a flying session but only after going flying again on the next Sunday when it was difficult to draw up fuel to prime. Clearly, many people use this fuel without a problem so what causes the powdery/ soft cheese residue in some situations is a puzzle.

If Prosynth works for particular users then that's fine, but why all the daft secrecy about its lubricant? Either a strange marketing ploy (secret so must be great) or as has been said, maybe they don't know for sure (unlikely).

Oh well, it's a talking point if nothing else.

Edited by Cuban8
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Could the creamy substance you describe be old residue oil from previous fuels that has not yet been fully dissolved and washed through? 

 

I seem to remember back in my youth some bikers in the crowd on Chelsea bridge using Castrol R to get that wonderful smell from the exhaust. What they missed was that you only poured a small drop in the fuel tank to get the smell. Unlike the few who could afford  proper Goldie that used "Reasons the main lubricant . Instead they drained their oil tanks and refilled with Castrol R without any flushing or cleaning. Their machine quickly gummed up as the R mixed with residual oil and started to set when it cooled a bit . The bikes needed a total strip down as the R being castor oil, vegetable based didn't mix with the mineral oil and resulted in a sort of creamy  glue. Very funny at the time seeing the ton up boys pushing their bike home😁 and even funnier when they got a proper ribbing the next time they came up the Bridge. 

Anyone remember the tea and pie kiosk " up the bridge"

E.D.

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55 minutes ago, Engine Doctor said:

I don't think many "hair driers"  ( scooters for the un- initiated ) were thrown in but certainly a few bikes were thrown in the river if the owners abused thier girl friends ! 

I can’t think of any occasion, where a motor bike is valued over a girl friend. OK, dad could do machines, but ………….dribble, dribble.

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23 hours ago, Cuban8 said:

Clearly, many people use this fuel without a problem so what causes the powdery/ soft cheese residue in some situations is a puzzle.

 

They do state they have an anti-corrosion additive in there. Perhaps that reacted with something in your previous blend?

 

Or the oils didn't mix? I though there was an issue with differing oils not playing nicely together.

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18 minutes ago, Nigel R said:

 

They do state they have an anti-corrosion additive in there. Perhaps that reacted with something in your previous blend?

 

Or the oils didn't mix? I though there was an issue with differing oils not playing nicely together.

Oh er, I've been mixing Prosynth 10% with Southern Modelcraft straight synthetic to make 5% which I've been running my old Laser 62 and various two strokes on, no issues and no signs of any unusual residues, but I've only used around 2 gals of this mix.  

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On 16/01/2022 at 09:33, Cuban8 said:

If Prosynth works for particular users then that's fine, but why all the daft secrecy about its lubricant?

 

It occurs to me, with my cynical hat on, that they've mixed, run, tested, and decided to go with a fairly low oil content. As a thing, low oil also helps keep the cost down.

 

Thing is, I reckon a lot of flyers still want lots of oil. So declaring the oil percentage might be a killer for marketing.

 

Who knows. Just a thought.

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5 hours ago, Nigel R said:

 

It occurs to me, with my cynical hat on, that they've mixed, run, tested, and decided to go with a fairly low oil content. As a thing, low oil also helps keep the cost down.

 

Thing is, I reckon a lot of flyers still want lots of oil. So declaring the oil percentage might be a killer for marketing.

 

Who knows. Just a thought.

I was interested in it for the very reason it may have a lower oil content than most fuels, but still can't find out !!!

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Nah its global warming or Acid rain, or the other possibility that no one or very few knows what the hell they are actually talking about, and their talking as much tosh as a one year old kid on meth, and no I dont use Weston Fuel but know of many who use it with no problems. On rereading these posts it occurred to me  next time i need engine help Ill go and have my palms read, tea leaf's, Next door neighbour,🤣

 

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