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Member postings for Andy48

Here is a list of all the postings Andy48 has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: BMFA numbers. Is this true, or a gross exaggeration?
13/11/2019 16:27:45

I think it is the wrong approach to try and attract young people. As has been said the world is changing. The world most of grew up in is no more, so it is wrong to expect current generations to behave and think as we did as youngsters.

Firstly, one only has to look at toys of all ages. These days many of the popular toys are very passive. The child doesn't have to do much. Building toys such as Meccano have declined, with really only Lego left as a major player.

Next take children themselves. They are not encouraged to be outdoors as much. Even from a very early age they are saddled with homework, and after a far more stressful school day than we ever experienced, and a pile of homework they simply want to do nothing or chill out in front of a video game or TV. - When I was growing up it was unreliable black and white TV and just 4 channels.

Now many youngsters leave home to go to university. Over 3 times as many as when I went. This is a big disjoint on any model flying hobby. After university they are working, and having to work far harder than we ever had to, and finding the time to build, repair and fly just isn't there.

The people clubs need to attract are the over 50s with grown up kids, and time on their hands to develop the hobby. Indeed over the last few years, the members joining my club have all been from this age range.

Perhaps clubs ought to pursue training nights, not just to fly but to learn the ins and outs of modern transmitters, to learn about motors, both electric and IC, and also to impart building skills.

Thread: LUA script
03/11/2019 22:44:41

For me the best setting on the Neuron is being able to set the current limit. Magic!

Thread: LIPO Battery Duration Query
29/10/2019 21:24:25
Posted by RC Plane Flyer on 29/10/2019 20:36:13:

I am a predominantly an IC flyer and can have long stint in the sky as our patch is usually quiet when I can get there in mid week but busy on weekends, I have a Sarik Tracer E on a 1700mAh and easily get 8 mins which is enough.

Appreciate the Easy Street 2 is a heavier model but I can see at 4.5 mins it time to get it down and was only looking to see what others may get on 2200 or 2900 capacity batteries

I guessed so. Before you buy anything try out my suggestion above at the field. Most IC flyers who start to go electric almost always fly on full throttle most of the time. However, the characteristics of an electric setup are quite different. There is a lot of power at lower throttle settings. I rarely need more than half throttle to take off.

Also remember that adding a larger battery adds more weight, which may well affect the handling characteristics, and almost certainly will require more power, so somewhat counter productive.

28/10/2019 20:50:39

You will get a significantly longer flight if you fly at less than full throttle, yet you will barely notice a speed difference. Above 2/3 throttle, the current consumption rises substantially, yet with much less improvement in thrust.

Thread: NEW POLL - do you use a throttle kill switch?
26/10/2019 20:54:55

My version also gives a bleep every second, so its easy to know when to release the switch, and of course audible warnings for arm and disarm are also used, as indeed you have done.

Thread: BEC alternatives
26/10/2019 16:44:17

Why not simply use the BEC built into most speed controllers? Sounds like you are making life difficult for yourself.

Thread: NEW POLL - do you use a throttle kill switch?
26/10/2019 16:41:25
Posted by Geoff Sleath on 26/10/2019 16:39:55:

As for remembering which way is 'off', I've been involved in electronics (radio/TV in the 1950s) and electrical systems just about all my life and toggle switches (including light switches that aren't 2-way) are always 'up' for 'off'. y rate switches are always set for up being the lower rate as that seems analogous to off (or safer).

Geoff

No longer true. Check a modern Consumer Unit for the house.

26/10/2019 16:39:31
Posted by Andy48 on 26/10/2019 16:38:31:
Posted by Gary Manuel on 26/10/2019 13:39:17:

No - but there's a reason why I don't.

I like to have the same switch allocated for the same function on all my models. I use a sprung 2 position switch on my I/C models which is used to kill the engine when pressed. It either works by just fully closing the throttle or by operating a kill switch when one is fitted to the model. The sprung part of it reduces the risk of me accidentally killing the engine whilst in flight (plus it only works in the flight mode I use for take off's and landing). The same sprung part of it makes it useless as a kill switch for electric though.

I'm planning on switching to a Horus Tx soon, so maybe I'll rethink this as a Horus doesn't have any sprung switches (I don't think), but is does have the flexibility to allow a sticky throttle switch to be programmed.

Yes the Horus does have a sprung switch, (called a momentary switch). I swapped one of my other 2-way switches out and made that a momentary switch too. Its easy to change this in OpenTX so both switches are recognised as momentary switches.These momentary switches are tremendously useful with OpenTX, such as being able to get it to play a range of telemetry parameters, or an almost foolproof kill switch where you have to hold the momentary switch on for between 3 and 5 seconds with the throttle closed for it to either arm or disarm. Thus knocking the switch simply has no effect. Works perfectly with electric flight.

 

Edited By Andy48 on 26/10/2019 16:40:12

26/10/2019 16:38:31
Posted by Gary Manuel on 26/10/2019 13:39:17:

No - but there's a reason why I don't.

I like to have the same switch allocated for the same function on all my models. I use a sprung 2 position switch on my I/C models which is used to kill the engine when pressed. It either works by just fully closing the throttle or by operating a kill switch when one is fitted to the model. The sprung part of it reduces the risk of me accidentally killing the engine whilst in flight (plus it only works in the flight mode I use for take off's and landing). The same sprung part of it makes it useless as a kill switch for electric though.

I'm planning on switching to a Horus Tx soon, so maybe I'll rethink this as a Horus doesn't have any sprung switches (I don't think), but is does have the flexibility to allow a sticky throttle switch to be programmed.

Yes the Horus does have a sprung switch, (called a momentary switch). I swapped one of my other 2-way switches out and made that a momentary switch too. They are tremendously useful with OpenTX, such as being able to get it to play a range of telemetry parameters, or an almost foolproof kill switch where you have to hold the momentary switch on for between 3 and 5 seconds with the throttle closed for it to either arm or disarm. Thus knocking the switch simply has no effect.

Thread: Electric Thrust
22/10/2019 17:27:15
Posted by Stuphedd on 22/10/2019 13:58:40:

15 years or so I built a thrust rig using strain gauges and linear frictionless bearings to try and understand this new brushless power system that was becoming popular but info was very limited .

It worked , and I got lots of data , re current , speed , prop size etc but all static figs and was of use only as a comparator , not actual lbs of thrust.

Much simpler, just use a simple electronic scale for weighing suitcases. Many are accurate to 50gm.

22/10/2019 17:22:52
Posted by Bob Cotsford on 22/10/2019 13:08:08:

How well does the static thrust predict a model's performance in the air? I ask as we often talk of props being stalled when running full chat on the ground, particularly when getting a model noise tested, as we all know that a stalled prop causes at least a couple of extra dBa (at least it's my excuse!). I can see it having relevance for slower flying models where there is less difference between ground and flying prop loads, but what about faster stuff?

ok, Eflightray beat me to it!

Edited By Bob Cotsford on 22/10/2019 13:08:55

The only thing I use is a static trust rig coupled with the tx telemetry to measure such things as current. This has never let me down. It is surprising just how a slightly different sized prop can make quite a difference. Its also interesting to see the thrust at various throttle settings. Put all this together and it works well. Clearly such a rig would show the prop stalling. In the air, telemetry shows very similar results, and now being able to measure RPM, air speed current, battery voltage etc., I'm pretty confident with my electric systems.

However, for me, all out speed is not the most important criteria.

Thread: Altitude announcements
17/10/2019 10:34:36

The G-RX8 has the high precision variometer, so height is accurate to about 2 feet.

16/10/2019 16:27:59

First of all which variometer are you using, the normal precision one which is accurate to 3 feet, or the high precision one which is accurate to a foot according to the specs, but that could be plus or minus a foot or 3 feett.

Then you have to consider the delays in the system.

Easier, and probably just as accurate to curb your OCD tendancies.

If one us using it for training purposes, then a simpler system would be to set several text markers to announce the height, say, over 250 feet every 50 feet. i.e. "You are now above 250 feet." Its surprising how few can judge what 400 feet looks like.

Thread: Better builder than pilot
11/10/2019 12:12:03
Posted by Martin_K on 01/10/2019 10:47:47:

Could the solution for nervous pilots be the stabilising RX? Test one out on an unloved plane then fit to the new beauty? I have never programmed such an RX but my understanding is you can limit roll and have hands off self levelling. The maiden will still be a thrill!

I find them great for landing on those gusty days when I would probably not fly that plane otherwise, but once in the air, provided you have enough height, they offer very little for the nervous pilot except a feeling of dependency.

Thread: XYH motors
10/10/2019 17:16:32
Posted by Mike Blandford on 10/10/2019 16:10:49:

My most recent electrification is a 60" span aerobatic model. I'm using a FrSky Neuron ESC with 8A, switch mode BEC. The BEC output voltage is programmable up to 8V. I'm using 4S lipo (two off 3000mAh in parallel). Since I use a FrSky Tx, I get all the telemetry data from the ESC (flight pack voltage and current, ESC temperature, RPM, and BEC voltage). It also has a programmable current limit.

Mike

That last feature is really useful. Shame they are rather a pig to program.

Thread: BMFA 'B' Test Video Available
09/10/2019 21:59:12

Frankly it makes not a jot of difference where the arming plug goes, positive side or negative. There is no such thing as being full or empty of electricity.

Personally I stand very much as in the video with my feet behind the wings, and usually put the tx on the ground next to me whilst arming. As I use a neck strap I have the arming plug clipped to the neck strap in place of the tx. That way I don't forget it. Then with the model pointing in the right direction on the flight strip I stand back and test all the controls. I must admit I don't test the controls with full throttle on the ground (except with a new model and when it gets a "service" ), and I've never had a problem here. I probably would test this if I flew IC though with a greater possibility of interference and problems with vibration.

Edited By Andy48 on 09/10/2019 22:04:32

Edited By Andy48 on 09/10/2019 22:04:59

Thread: Open tx 2.3.?
09/10/2019 21:42:01

I had three planes all crashed in similar circumstances with loss of signal within a fortnight. I got rid of my Spekky (as did many other club members) and never had a problem since.

Check out the simulator in the Companion. A great way to test out your model works as expected before hooking up a receiver.

Edited By Andy48 on 09/10/2019 21:43:41

09/10/2019 20:26:33

Kim, you don't need Zadig at all. The firmware is simply updated from the Companion. If you want a reasonably updated set of documentation see here. This is for 2.2 but covers 99% of what is on 2.3, and its only some of the most recent changes that are missing:

OpenTX Documentation

Thread: BMFA 'B' Test Video Available
09/10/2019 20:21:49
Posted by Steve J on 09/10/2019 19:29:42:
Posted by Andy48 on 09/10/2019 19:00:24:
Posted by Steve J on 09/10/2019 18:52:35:

I connect the battery with the model mechanically restrained or with the prop prevented from rotating (or both) and with my body in a stable position.

How do you prevent the prop from rotating?

Is that a serious question? By putting the prop in contact with something such that it cannot rotate e.g. a toolbox or a steel toecap boot.

Steve

Of course its a serious question, there is a lot of torque with an electric motor, and a prop in contact with a toecap or a toolbox is quite likely to lift the whole model up if it starts rotating on full power. Then what? BTW how do you stand in a stable position behind the propeller with one foot stopping the prop from turning whilst connecting the battery,

Frankly much better would be to adapt the safety plug idea on the side of the model.

09/10/2019 19:00:24
Posted by Steve J on 09/10/2019 18:52:35:

I connect the battery with the model mechanically restrained or with the prop prevented from rotating (or both) and with my body in a stable position.

Steve

How do you prevent the prop from rotating?

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