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Soldering, Where Am I Going Wrong?

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Danny Fenton16/01/2015 15:42:16
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9198 forum posts
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Thats good to hear, as I said I might not be seeing the full picture, but I had to ask

Cheers

Danny

Shaunie16/01/2015 22:23:27
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Sorry Dai, but I have to agree with the others. If the solder has not wicked out from under the binding onto the piano wire I would not accept it. Even if the piano wire is soldered underneath the situation you have will cause a stress raiser and the joint will crack and thus fail at some point.

The discussion about filing soldering iron bits depends on the type of bit. Early bits were solid copper, could be filed and in fact needed to be as the solder dissolved the copper resulting in the tip needing frequent re-profiling. Modern bits however are iron coated, have a very long life and should never be filed. Use a soldering iron sponge kept damp, not soaking wet to clean the tip. If the tip goes black in a short period of time then your temperature is too high.

The golden rule is to have plenty of Watts but always use a thermostatically controlled iron, especially if you solder only infrequently.

Shaunie.

Poppy Ann Lynagh-Smith21/02/2015 10:17:15
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6 forum posts
Posted by Dai Fledermaus on 19/12/2014 16:03:08:

As a callow youth, I seem to remember having no problems soldering fuel tanks together from galvanized tin plate for some of my control line models, but at the moment I can't seem to keep my soldering iron clean enough for more than a minute or two to solder some undercarriage legs together.

I've bought and tried various paste type flux, but the copper tip of my 70watt iron soon goes black, so I have to stop, let it cool and clean it up again to a bright copper finish only for the same thing to happen again. Time consuming and very frustrating.

The only flux I haven't tried is Bakers Fluid, only because I can't buy it locally. Could this be the answer?

Hi Dai, it sounds like you have the iron set to high if the tip turns black quickly after cleaning and tinning it, you mentioned you use to solder "galvanized Tin plate" it is either galvanised or tin not both, galvanised is coated in zink and tin is coated with ti.

if it was tin plate then it is easy to solder but Galvanized plate is harder, a thing to watch out for is the fumes that come off Galvanized plate are not good to breath so try not to end up breathing them.

It is much easier to use bakers fluid to solder plate items than to use cored solder but always remember to remove all the flux after you finish soldering, the best way is with warm water for most people.

I know you are meant to wash it off with an acid but for most of us we do not like to keep acid around the home and water removes almost all of it

good luck with your project,

Regards Poppy Ann.

Martin McIntosh23/02/2015 12:08:58
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2947 forum posts
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Just having a look at this thread. I am a professional solderer and the only type of iron worth having is a temperature controlled one. I do not use anything flashy at work, just a cheap solder station from CPC, cat. No. SD01116 with various coated tips available for about £1 each.

Don`t even think about using lead free solder, besides being very difficult to flow you need special cleaning equipment for the tips.

I solder quite a lot of u/c`s and linkages at home and you need a none corrosive flux (I use Templers Telux) every time on steel wire.

I think the confusion about silver solder is that on some types 2% silver is added to lead/tin (Sn62) which lowers the melting point slightly and has specialist applications (like soldering gold plated connectors).

John Cooper 123/02/2015 22:42:04
22 forum posts

Good joints require 3 things:-cleanliness- clean then clean & clean again! Heat & plenty of it (I use a 6oz. solid copper iron) Tin everything before attempting to join. Job done! Never had a failed joint in 60 years.

Chuck Plains23/02/2015 23:28:21
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1096 forum posts
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You've created a useful thread here Dai.

And now I'm cursing because I've filed the tip of my smaller soldering iron! Doh! I'll have to get another tip now. face 24

Dai Fledermaus24/02/2015 08:53:40
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1031 forum posts
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Posted by Chuck Plains on 23/02/2015 23:28:21:

You've created a useful thread here Dai.

And now I'm cursing because I've filed the tip of my smaller soldering iron! Doh! I'll have to get another tip now. face 24

Sorry about that Chuck, but whilst I started the thread, I talked about having to clean up the tip of my iron. I didn't mention filing it at all. That was an assumption that others made. You can blame them for you're shiny new iron.

Chuck Plains24/02/2015 18:52:52
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1096 forum posts
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Posted by Dai Fledermaus on 24/02/2015 08:53:40:

Sorry about that Chuck, but whilst I started the thread, I talked about having to clean up the tip of my iron. I didn't mention filing it at all. That was an assumption that others made. You can blame them for you're shiny new iron.

Hehe, yes I realize that Dai, but what others have mentioned makes perfect sense. I was about to say that I'll be off to Maplin in a day ow two, but I just saw their prices. £4.69 for a set of 3 tips, where similar is £1.50 on Ebay. Hmm.

Martin McIntosh24/02/2015 19:42:54
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2947 forum posts
1083 photos

Exactly what type of iron are you trying to use CP?

Paul Marsh24/02/2015 19:51:07
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3725 forum posts
1055 photos

Lead-free solder or modern solder is rubbish. Give me nasty, toxic old style solder any day.

Have a few rolls of solder my dad got from ICL in the seventies - he still has some in his workshop. Brilliant stuff, and a roll last for years, as they are 100 meters long and proper multi core.

John Cooper 124/02/2015 20:09:25
22 forum posts

All this talk about problems with flux, solder ,irons is a red herring get the preparation right & the joint will be right.

I agree using the correct flux is important, tallow for lead wiped joints ( not common now),witches ( Bakers for those under 40!) for steel & Fluxite for all others.

Martin McIntosh24/02/2015 20:41:17
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2947 forum posts
1083 photos

Sorry to disagree John but just cleaning a part does not mean that it will solder magically. Plumbers don`t clean copper tubes any more because the flux and heat does it for them. As for Bakers Fluid it is something out of the arc and has no place in modelling.

I think that too many people have been influenced by that ridiculous article in the mag. a while ago actually advocating buying acid and then dissolving the zinc plate on a piece of galvanised metal in it. They may still have to do that in the outback but not here. He even said that you must not touch the highly polished parts. Rubbish!

Piano wire only requires cleaning a little with sandpaper or a file as does brass tube (on the inside of the ends as well). Tinned or otherwise copper wire is simply run through the sandpaper.

The flux I mentioned above is non corrosive and does not even need cleaning off. It will easily cope with steel/brass/copper. It is the iron temperature which is important. Many do not know the difference between heat and temperature. 320-350 deg. maintained by a thermostatically controlled iron is all that is needed. I only need a 3-4mm tip to do 2x 8g wire.

John Cooper 124/02/2015 21:06:04
22 forum posts

That's fine if you have all the expensive kit & are a member of Green Piece! but for those of us in the real world cleanliness added by the correct flux & in iron with good heat retention will give as good results.( I am retired & living in rural Spain with solar power & 120mile round trip to buy a hacksaw blade!) But learnt to solder at school many moons ago & those skills still work using what I can buy locally--what they are I don't know but they still stick things together!

Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator25/02/2015 00:02:47
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15748 forum posts
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Gentlemen, may I suggest the use of rather more temperate language? We don't do describing other peoples' opinions as "rubbish" on here. Please feel free to disagree and present your own opinion - but remember that's all it ever is - your opinion. And you are perfectly entitled to it - even when you are wrong wink 2

So, let's have a debate by all means - but let's ease up on the pejorative comments about other peoples views "I don't agree..." works perfectly well in most cases!

BEB

Martin McIntosh25/02/2015 00:50:14
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2947 forum posts
1083 photos

Dave, I sent an email to the editor about that article but had no reply. I stand by what I said and the contents of it are way out of tune with the way things are done in this century. `Rubbish` is not an opinion, just fact and no offence was intended.

Remember that I solder for a living as opposed to tuning engines.

Delete this if you wish.

I am only trying to pass on my experience to others.

Edited By Martin McIntosh on 25/02/2015 00:52:24

Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator25/02/2015 10:06:46
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15748 forum posts
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This isn't really up for debate Martin. No more disparaging remarks please. You can disagree without being rude.

Everything everyone says on here is only an opinion - some more informed than others that's true; but that is for readers to decide not proponents and thereby hangs 95% of the fun!

End of issue - back to the thread.

BEB

jack lackmaker25/02/2015 11:38:37
96 forum posts
1 photos

Hi dremmel do one with a high and a low heat setting.

Edited By Pete B - Moderator on 25/02/2015 12:59:04

Martin McIntosh25/02/2015 22:35:48
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2947 forum posts
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OK BEB.

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