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Sometimes I am in despair with folks

Quadcopter Crazy

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Adrian Smith 105/01/2015 16:59:44
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As a solo flyer with fixed wing aircraft using petrol engines, I am lucky to fly off a disused airfield. While I do belong to a club I find I am happier with the freedom to "do my thing" although it means that I am quite disciplined in how I prepare and fly my aircraft. Now occasionally I get a visit from a chap who bought and electric foamie and is trying to teach himself. Unsuccessfully I might add with numerous broken props and dings to wing and fuselage. Hence his visit to where I fly solo. He asked me to check his model out and first I found there was quite a large rudder trim to the right which shouldn't be there and also the elevator was operating in opposite sense! Anyway I adjusted it for him and said I would test fly it at his risk. This I did and trimmed it out (not much needed by the way) and flew quite nicely. Anyway I said I would lend him my flight sim to get some stick time and get his confidence back. This he did and the next time I saw him is managed to fly it without crashing. Now I am no qualified instructor (only have my A cert from years ago), so suggested he joined the local club and be taught without any vices. He didn't seem too keen and was full of ideas of what to by next.

Well the next time I saw him he told me he had written off £400 of quadcopters, one with a camera, which he got for Christmas! And "one flew into someone's garden and crashed but I couldn't trace it".

This is madness and now he's bought a glowed engine trainer that he knows nothing about expecting to fly that. I said I would check it out when finished but I do worry that it will all end in bits. I know it's a bit hypercritical of me to say join a club given I prefer to fly solo now, but I fear this will end in tears.

Dave Hopkin05/01/2015 17:03:49
3672 forum posts
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As they say "you can lead a horse to water"

Personally I wouldnt worry about the plane, I'd be worrying about his neighbours and other innocent bystanders!

The Wright Stuff05/01/2015 17:15:33
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Well, to be fair he may well have gone ahead and bought them and crashed them anyway, without your help. I don't think you need to feel any responsibility!

Chris Barlow05/01/2015 17:19:08
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Some people don't want to join a club for various reasons. They think it's expensive, don't need to because flying is easy, think it's full of rules to stop any fun, don't want to be told not to do something, don't want to be told what to do, think they know everything they need to know already, intimidation of "profesional" pilots etc Most of these people don't actually get over until they join a club! Catch 22 really.

But no need to dispair though. Some people really do learn to fly on their own and can do a good job of it too. After all the pioneers of flight (RC and real) were mostly self taught and sometimes it's nice to hear of people taking on the adventure or trying things for themselves and succeeding.

Over the years I hear quite a few people I know tell me they used to have a plane once, a big one with a nitro engine, and crashed it. One friend even had a Raptor 50 he tried to fly on the school football field. He did crash it but it would be impressive if he had gone on to tell me it was great fun and had hours of fun with it.

You just never know...

Adrian Smith 105/01/2015 17:25:17
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I suspect by the end of January a large percentage of Quadcopters received for Christmas will be trashed anyway leaving only the retailers happy.

ken anderson.05/01/2015 17:40:54
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I watched a one of our club members chasing his yesterday...orientation is a major problem......he was done in for when he came back to where we were....rolling around laughing at his expense ....and lots of unrepeatable words etc.. kulou .....

ken Anderson...ne....1....... unrepeatable words dept.

cymaz05/01/2015 17:51:05
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I admire your patience Adrian...some people can't be told, if they are told they can't listen. You can't win.

Masher05/01/2015 17:58:25
1106 forum posts
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It's taken me a while and it's a shame really but I have finally learned to keep my advice to myself unless specifically asked. We have had a run of new members who are experts on everything even though they are not flyers or builders!

These people have chosen to learn the hard way.

Peter Miller05/01/2015 18:13:29
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10966 forum posts
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I was asked for advice the other day by someone that I know. They wanted to buy some 2.4 Ghz radio.

I spent a lot of time talking to him. Then I spent a lot of time researching stuff on the internet and then a lot more time on the phone to him. In the end my advice was ignored.Well, I hope that he is happy with his choice.

 

Edited By Peter Miller on 05/01/2015 18:14:13

john stones 105/01/2015 18:25:32
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11455 forum posts
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The next time someone asks you fellas for help and advice...you'll give it, as it's in your naturewink

We get the odd pudding but that's their losssmiley

John

Masher05/01/2015 18:28:25
1106 forum posts
79 photos

You are probably right John - I certainly benefited from lots of help when I started out and would like to do the same for others

Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator05/01/2015 18:36:48
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I agree John. Really we just have to keep on trying to help. And we all know the pleasure (for both parties) when someone does listen, takes the ideas on board and is successful. One of those makes up for all the numties in my view.

BEB

Former Member05/01/2015 20:41:25

[This posting has been removed]

The Wright Stuff06/01/2015 08:22:06
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1381 forum posts
226 photos

I wonder why model flying can so frequently breed overconfidence in beginners. I mean, there are lots of activities that a skilled and experienced person can make look easy through their proficiency, but we know they are not easy. If I see a street entertainer on a tightrope, I don't immediately think "I could do that". Similarly, I understand that to belt out Chopin on a piano takes years and years of meticulous practice.

So why is model flying any different?

That said, provided someone is realistic about their intended learning curve, and not overconfident, then it can be very rewarding to figure things out for yourself, accept a slower rate of progress perhaps, but enjoy doing it at your own pace. I had a bit of club help for the first half-dozen flights or so, but then largely became self taught thereafter, progressing gradually to more difficult models once I'd mastered the simpler ones. But it only worked for me because I respected the difficulty of the task, rather than assuming it was easy!!!

Masher06/01/2015 08:42:23
1106 forum posts
79 photos

Yes we don't seem to suffer lack of confidence issues with the majority of beginners these days! Maybe it's because people can get so much information off the internet? Trouble is, they don't realise information isn't quite the same as experience. I have found it difficult to explain to a couple of people that whilst simulators are a great tool (but not for me I'm afraid), real life model flying is different.

Being realistic is an issue also. One chap came last year with zero experience in anything model related and had set aside the month of August to learn to fly with a view to going the warbird route. He is very good at providing "useful guidance and post flight analysis" to us more experienced flyers but unsurprisingly he hasn't got very far with his own flying yet! wink

Josip Vrandecic -Mes06/01/2015 11:11:29
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2993 forum posts
260 photos

Dear Adrian, if you do not mind I think that a new generation of RC flyers ,with a few exceptions, suffers from the syndrome: ''''immediately, now or never '' smile o... so ,I think you should not feel guilty for anything, especially after the old biblical saying:'' Every good work will be punished''....

Regards

Jo

Former Member06/01/2015 14:09:47

[This posting has been removed]

Steve T06/01/2015 14:23:47
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488 forum posts
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Just remember, as I have not been a member of this forum for all that long, that not all are stupid enough not to listen to great advice that is given by you all on here, people who I have never met, probably won't ever meet, but feel as is I know, Josip, one of the first to welcome me, BEB telling me off for language, Terry, Vinegar Dave, there you go just a very few, there is so much to learn and be taught by you guys, well done. Forget the 'new' knowalls who do not want to learn, if they don't then let them blow their well spent money away. They are not real areomodellers and never will be, we are better off without them. Hmmmm, rant over, sorry.

The Wright Stuff06/01/2015 14:34:43
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1381 forum posts
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Absolutely, Steve. We should never be put off from offering advice just because we don't think it is being acted upon.

It reminds me of when I first joined a club when I finished uni. I was still relatively new to flying, and when I turned up at the field, the club chairman was there, supervising a new flier (a young boy with his Dad) with his trainer. The chairman was taking quite a stand-offish approach to instructing, yelling instructions to the poor trainee from the pits. No buddy box or friendly hands in sight!

Just as the kid was about to start his take-off run, control surface checks complete, the instructor turned to me and whispered "he's going to crash you know. He's trying to take off downwind". Fortunately, the kid realised in time, and did the walk of shame to the other end of the strip. As I recall, the flight was in the end successful, but my memory is haunted by the instructor who would have been content to stand and watch the kid crash.

Dave Hopkin06/01/2015 15:15:23
3672 forum posts
294 photos

I wonder how much "flying" things on Playstations and flight simulators (not specifcally RC ones) has created a sense of over confidence with people who have never flown? A sort of Clarksonesque "How hard can it be" syndrome

That isnt meant as a critisism of decent flight sims they do help, at least I find it does, but no matter how good they are they are not the real thing

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