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Here's how you build a fuselage and keep it straight without a jig

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David Ashby - Moderator17/01/2015 19:36:49
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Something of interest.

I've started the Challenger, the new laser-cut trad kit from Seagull.

Wings done, fuselage started.

The instructions are pretty poor and a long rectangular rod is included but it's purpose not stated - insert rod in fuselage it says, that's all.

seagchall1000.jpg

I couldn't quite work out the intention until I came to build the fus' and realised it's to keep the fus' straight when the end is brought together down at the tail.

The rod slips down through laser-cut slots so ensuring that twists etc. don't occur. It's quite clever really and a sign that ARTF designers have to design models so they can be built quickly without jigs.

A quick glance at Seagull's Facebook page (and all the model production photos) seems to confirm this.

I hadn't come across this method before, perhaps others have?

seagchall1001.jpg

 

Edited By David Ashby - RCME on 17/01/2015 19:39:52

john stones 117/01/2015 19:42:53
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It looks a very clever inclusion David, is it a bit of Ali ?

John

Tony Bennett17/01/2015 19:42:56
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nice idea.

does the box get glued in or is it just taken out after the fuselage has been built.

David Ashby - Moderator17/01/2015 19:45:50
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Yes, a bit of ali John.

It must be removed Tony - I'd better remember to do that teeth 2

Tony Bennett17/01/2015 19:52:46
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ooh free tube for other uses then.

nice. wink

Phil Francis17/01/2015 20:30:51
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Just seen this the other night, have a look at this thread (80" Sea Vixen) page 2

Phil

Matt Jones17/01/2015 21:05:10
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Good spot Phil, I've used the same technique on my Vulcan and Sea Vixen:

kevin b17/01/2015 21:20:27
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Hi David.

Not being pedantic, but actually it is a jig ! One of the simplest forms of as well.

The best ideas are sometimes the simplest. smiley

David Ashby - Moderator17/01/2015 21:57:10
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Lol, I knew that Kevin embarrassed

Former Member22/01/2015 14:40:46

[This posting has been removed]

PatMc22/01/2015 15:55:55
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IIRC an aluminium tube fuselage jig was used by CAP for their Vulcan kit in the early 1970's.

Martyn K22/01/2015 15:58:46
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That looks nice - I fancy one of those...

Very nice in fact,,

SMC

M

Terry Walters22/01/2015 16:28:08
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So ARTF manufacturers have finally wised up to the market that exists out there that hasn't really be properly fed yet. Looks nice David - good price too. Maybe the future may produce some scale models as well.

Terry

Jon Laughton22/01/2015 21:53:33
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David

'Jigless assembly' concepts have been around for quite a while in advanced aerospace developments. Its good to see a model manufacturer using this concept to help us!

Jon

David Ashby - Moderator23/01/2015 07:10:05
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Martin - it's not a large model but I'm really enjoying the build. A few moments of head scratching along the way but it's slotting together pretty well.

Jon - I guess they have to from a mass production perspective. Take a look at Seagull's Facebook page and you'll see weekly sets of photos from the production line - they seem to build sections on a table with nothing more than a bottle of cyano and, I assume, the odd bit of Ali rod.

Cuban823/01/2015 07:42:17
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Posted by David Ashby - RCME on 23/01/2015 07:10:05:

Jon - I guess they have to from a mass production perspective. Take a look at Seagull's Facebook page and you'll see weekly sets of photos from the production line - they seem to build sections on a table with nothing more than a bottle of cyano and, I assume, the odd bit of Ali rod.

Amazing, looks like organised chaos with no indication of a 'production line' as I understand it. However, they get the models out the door in quantity and in ever improving quality, so you've got to take your hat off to them.

Peter Miller23/01/2015 08:42:48
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Some Berkley kits in the late 40s early50s used a carboard jig. The modern Hummelbird homebuilt is built by attaching the formers to a wooden beam and then rolling sheet metal round them.

Jon - Laser Engines23/01/2015 08:53:59
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I am interested in this but can find zero information about these models. Perkins website has nothing, the sussex site has that one model listed but I cant find it by navigating the menus. Im also confused as its seems to be a challenger super sporter, which they do as an artf, and yet the quoted span is larger at 61 not 52? and yet the wing area is the same :\

Do they do any others in this range?

Jon Laughton23/01/2015 09:24:02
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Dave - don't use Facebook I'm afraid so I guess that makes me a dinosaur!wink

Chris Bott - Moderator23/01/2015 10:00:39
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Looks like there's a Boomerang too

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