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Brown paper/emulsion/varnish

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fly boy302/04/2015 16:55:19
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3520 forum posts
18 photos

Hi all, will one coat only of varnish be sufficient to fuel proof my brown paper and emulsion covered model. Cheers

Engine Doctor02/04/2015 17:35:50
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2300 forum posts
27 photos

It really depends on how porous the surface is . Apply one coat and see what happens if it soaks in then another will be needed to proof the surface. What varnish are you using ? Normal varnish is quite slow drying and could soak in more leaving a porous finish . Clear-coat by Solarlac is quick drying and would proof it ok . Thin coats will dry quicker and not soak in as much . whatever you use remember it all adds weight so keep coats thin.

Edited By Engine Doctor on 02/04/2015 17:36:21

fly boy302/04/2015 18:19:57
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3520 forum posts
18 photos

Hi EG thanks for quick reply. I amusing A matt varnish that does dry very quickly. Also the emulsion has already had a coat of primer as well. The varnish is water based. One coat seems ok to me, but as this is the first time , I thought I would ask. Thanks

Dave Hopkin02/04/2015 18:38:58
3672 forum posts
294 photos

Water based PU varnished like Ezecote are sold as "fuel resistant" not "fuel proof" (the customary term) so I would hesitate to rely on it as fuel proofer

fly boy302/04/2015 21:47:04
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3520 forum posts
18 photos

Thanks both , perhaps a trial of a drop of fuel on say the under neath of the fuz would be the order of the day. Wonder what the differance between "fuel resistant, and "fuel proof" actually mean. Cheers  Would Poly-C be suitable ?

Edited By fly boy3 on 02/04/2015 21:50:05

Dave Hopkin02/04/2015 21:59:49
3672 forum posts
294 photos

I doubt it, Ezecote, Poly-C, Ronseal Floor Varnish etc basically all the same thing (though gloss varies) - and I dont think any of them would be classed as Fuel Proof

I am guessing that if they advertised them as "fuel proff" and it allowed fuel in, they might (especially in the US) open the door to litigation, while if they class it as "resistent" then that implies it slows down the attack of fuel not stops it and as there is no time frame to the resistence then it would be impossible to sue them

fly boy302/04/2015 22:12:02
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3520 forum posts
18 photos

Thanks Dave, so perhaps a few coats of PU varnish will slow down the ingress of fuel. But I have read previuosly on the forum of Ronseal varnish etc being used to good effect ? Cheers

Dave Hopkin02/04/2015 22:42:02
3672 forum posts
294 photos

I stopped using Ezecote/poly-c and use Ronseal "Diamond Hard Floor Varnish" its no better or worse than the others its just half the price, the down side is its hard to find the small tins in clear and the large tins are £40 but still a huge saving

Tip dont use it in a room thats too warm - I did some on the kitchen table during the cold weather (much to SHMBO's "delight" and it developed a slight "bloom" I think because it dried too fast in the quite warm room, never had that in the shed where its "cooler"

stuey03/04/2015 07:18:37
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602 forum posts
12 photos

I am sure that I read here somewhere that oil based varnish is better as a fuel proofer.

Rick Tee03/04/2015 11:43:01
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297 forum posts
20 photos

I use exterior varnish which is oil based, its fuel proof but not completely clear. I have tried several makes of water based varnish none of which proved to be fuel proof, they resist fuel for a while then go soft, sticky and discolor You may have problems getting oil based paints to bond to water based paint.

onetenor03/04/2015 12:45:44
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1900 forum posts

Blooming is caused by high humidity and can occur wether hot or cold When I was painting houses if the weather was inclined to mist I stopped early to give the paint time to skin before the mist rolled in. When in garage trade the only time we got warm was when the paint sprayers turned up the blowers to warm the air ready for spraying so heat unlikely to bloom paints Vauxhall Motors use ovens to speed drying or at least they did . Lastly emulsion paint has a strange effect on some plastics ( cable insulation for instance   and ends up sticky . Poly Vinyl chemistry is very odd stuff so take care..

Dave Hopkin03/04/2015 13:04:47
3672 forum posts
294 photos
Posted by onetenor on 03/04/2015 12:45:44:

Blooming is caused by high humidity and can occur wether hot or cold When I was painting houses if the weather was inclined to mist I stopped early to give the paint time to skin before the mist rolled in. When in garage trade the only time we got warm was when the paint sprayers turned up the blowers to warm the air ready for spraying so heat unlikely to bloom paints Vauxhall Motors use ovens to speed drying or at least they did . Lastly emulsion paint has a strange effect on some plastics ( cable insulation for instance and ends up sticky . Poly Vinyl chemistry is very odd stuff so take care..

Well I guess being a kitchen, with the kettle, washing machine,tumble dryer etc the humidity was high so...

fly boy303/04/2015 14:17:36
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3520 forum posts
18 photos

Thanks all for your help. Think I will go for 2 layers of varnish, and extra attention cleaning model after every flight ? Cheers

Edited By fly boy3 on 03/04/2015 14:18:25

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