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Former Member19/08/2015 19:05:03

[This posting has been removed]

Chris Dobson 204/07/2020 00:56:47
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5 forum posts
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G'day all

Total newb here, sorry to rekindle an older thread, but I have just inherited a Horizons Systems RC kit, with several servos, and would love to get it functional again.

Need to know the function of the sockets on the bottom, and what sort of voltage these outfits run at? Any advice very much appreciated!

rctrans.jpg

kc04/07/2020 13:18:52
6587 forum posts
173 photos

Chris , no replies to your questions so far - so I suggest starting a new thread with Horizon mentioned in the title which will bring it to the attention of those who know about it.

GONZO04/07/2020 13:39:13
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1380 forum posts
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Single channel and old radio

Go to this forum and join. Post in 'proportional' in the 'radio control systems'. Ask for help and I am certain you will get help. Old radio's of all types, rebuilt radio's and new developments plus lots of electronic knowledge.

John Wagg04/07/2020 14:03:27
105 forum posts
19 photos
Posted by Chris Dobson 2 on 04/07/2020 00:56:47:

G'day all

Total newb here, sorry to rekindle an older thread, but I have just inherited a Horizons Systems RC kit, with several servos, and would love to get it functional again.

Need to know the function of the sockets on the bottom, and what sort of voltage these outfits run at? Any advice very much appreciated!

rctrans.jpg

Chris, can you remove the back off the case. The black socket on the right looks like a mini mains socket from years back. If so would be used for charging and therefore would expect to find a small transformer inside the case. The other socket could be for a buddy training but again need to see inside the Tx.

If you do intend reviving the Horizon then probably have to replace any rechargeable cells in there and also check for "black wire" from the battery to the circuit.

Voltage wise I would presume it would run of 8 rechargeable Ni-Cad cells = 9.6 volts nominal.

Edited By John Wagg on 04/07/2020 14:06:20

Edited By John Wagg on 04/07/2020 14:18:45

Barrie Lever04/07/2020 14:35:54
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271 forum posts
50 photos

Chris

Socket on the right as John says is the mains input for charging, give it a quick visual inside to check the mains wiring to the transformer before plugging it in.

The left socket is most likely the output from the Tx to the Rx for charging when the Tx is under mains power charging.

This was quite a common setup in the early 70's.

B.

Bob Cotsford04/07/2020 15:02:07
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8646 forum posts
483 photos

Barrie is spot on, the three pin is the mains in for the dual charger, the din socket supplies a trickle charge for a 4.8v Nicad pack. My red 8 channel set had 8 DEAC (nicad) cells iirc in two banks of four. Be warned, there was something odd about Horizon's PWM modulation as mine wouldn't work with anything but Horizon receivers. Does yours have the dual frequency switch on top?

EarlyBird04/07/2020 15:03:21
205 forum posts
164 photos

Barrie is spot on!

See here **LINK**

Steve

Chris Dobson 204/07/2020 23:59:15
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Thanks for all the tips guysthumbs up

And Steve - that link is GOLD !

(BTW, 1965 quite appropriate, prob about the year when I flew my first model aircraft - a KK Champ powered by an AM10. Crashed on maiden flight of course lol)

John Stainforth05/07/2020 01:39:01
367 forum posts
64 photos

By 1965, my brother and I had built a dozen model aircraft. The twelfth was this much modified Mercury Matador, which I think was powered by an AM10 (or was it an ED Bee?). This was a sketch I made of it in 1965. Although it was just a single channel rudder-only model, we got it very well trimmed and could usually spot-land it more or less at our feet. But not always, once we lost it in a thermal, and it ended up going 11 miles (from Nomansland in Hertfordshire) before ending up in a tall poplar tree on the edge of a big estate. It was only because some painters, who were working on the big house with very tall ladders, saw it in the tree - and we had our name and address on it - that we got it back, with only minor scratches.

matadorjsketch-0381.jpg

EarlyBird05/07/2020 08:36:28
205 forum posts
164 photos

Chris you are welcome.

In 1965 I was flying control line with a second hand AM25, pocket money would not stretch to new and RC was just a dream. Some ten years later I spent many hours on Nomansland flying a KK Caprice towline glider which after many flights flew away never to be seen again.

Steve

Peter Christy05/07/2020 08:46:52
1831 forum posts
Posted by Bob Cotsford on 04/07/2020 15:02:07:

Be warned, there was something odd about Horizon's PWM modulation as mine wouldn't work with anything but Horizon receivers.

There was indeed! Everyone else used a synchronising pulse that was longer than the longest channel pulse to keep the receiver in sync with the transmitter.

Horizon chose to use a sync pulse "shorter than the shortest", rather than "longer than the longest". This gave it a higher frame rate than other systems, but at the cost of considerable incompatibility. Receivers were not interchangeable with other brands, but also there were issues with servo incompatibility as well. (Similar to the present issue of using "analogue" servos with a high frame rate system).

It was also more difficult to detect the sync pulse - typically only 0.5mS, compared to a conventional 6 - 10mS. The final straw came when FM systems arrived, along with the requirement to operate at 10KHz channel spacing, rather than the previous 25KHz. It was difficult to fit such a short synchronising pulse into the required bandwidth!

It was an interesting attempt to do something a bit different, and worked OK, but in the end the relative simplicity of conventional systems won out.

--

Pete

Bob Cotsford05/07/2020 09:17:24
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8646 forum posts
483 photos

The other problem with them was the use of hollow pin plugs, similar to modern systems in principal except that the 'male' part was a naked split tube which rapidly loosened it's grip on the 'female' pin in the receiver. Most, if not all, of the issues that I had were down to these connectors becoming noisy, that or the soldered joints failing. Thank the Gods for progress!

My 8 channel was essentially the 4 channel with extra half-shots on the tx motherboard, two sliders on the front panel and a toggle switch on the top either side of the case.

I still have the case though the circuits were replaced with various magazine project systems over the years.

Phil Green06/07/2020 22:44:55
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1616 forum posts
343 photos
Posted by Chris Dobson 2 on 04/07/2020 23:59:15:

that link is GOLD !

Lots more where that came from Chris. See the Archive page of www.singlechannel.co.uk

Chris Dobson 207/07/2020 01:54:34
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5 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by Phil Green on 06/07/2020 22:44:55:
Posted by Chris Dobson 2 on 04/07/2020 23:59:15:

that link is GOLD !

Lots more where that came from Chris. See the Archive page of www.singlechannel.co.uk

Great! More lockdown fodder clockbeer

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