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Werewolf

Thoughts on a control line version?

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Werewolf

Werewolf

The plan build article by Peter Miller - 9/4/10

David Phipps18/02/2008 23:18:00
11 forum posts
Hi Peter, Werewolf looks great. Now then, I fancy making a 36" control line version powered by a 2.5cc PAW, and would be grateful for your thoughts.
Mark Lubbock21/02/2008 11:10:00
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313 forum posts
13 photos
I reckon it would make a great control liner-If using the ailerons as coupled flaps/elevators, I would make them full span & increase the chord a little-maybe make the TE (hingeline) straight would achieve this.
Allan Jordan24/02/2008 21:11:00
495 forum posts
 Hi Peter, Sounds good to me, Like your power unit by the way !
Peter Miller02/03/2008 09:44:00
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10529 forum posts
1246 photos
10 articles
Built full size it would be perfect for a .35 stunt engine. Would be fairly fast as the wing is comparartively thin for a stunter but it would cope with the wind better.
Peter Miller02/03/2008 09:48:00
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10529 forum posts
1246 photos
10 articles

Forgot to say, I agree with Mark, full span flaps would be essential  as using the aielrons at the tips would be fatal. I know I tried it on a scale model many years ago, Instant tipstall.

On the other hand, Pete Russell's 334G which was the inspiration for this design didn't use flaps and was powered by a 2.5cc engine. So David would be going full circle.(Pun not intended,)

COLIN MILNE06/07/2008 09:42:00
27 forum posts

Hi Peter,

I finally plucked up courage to build from a plan. I chose Werewolf.

My idea was to photo copy bits of the free plan on my all in one printer gizmo so as I could keep the original in decent condition free of glue etc and so as I could tape the tail end of the drawing to the main fus drawing in order to establish the true length of the fuselage sides.

I intended stick the photocopies to the balsa etc and cut out the components with my brand new scroll saw. This I duly did cutting out all the fus parts and all of the wing ribs and started to build the fus as directed in your accompanying article. So far so good. I was enjoying myself.

 I assembled the basic fuselage formers etc to the stage where I could offer the wing ribs into the wing seat area to check the fit. They were nowhere near. Something strange here I thought. So I tried the fuselage assembly against the photocopied drawing. This seemed fine so I did the same with the wing ribs against the original drawing. Once more nowhere near. I then offered up the glued up fus carcass to the original drawing. It was small by about 8-10% in all directions.

The PENNY eventually rolled around the building board, tipped into an ever decreasing spin, and eventually DROPPED. My all singing, all dancing, printer-copier-scanner had not scaled the photocopies true to scale and had reduced them. This meant all the work I had done to date was destined for the scrap heap. My heart sank down somewhere between my boxer shorts and my knees.

I work in specialist joinery manufacturing and we regularly build complex shaped reception counters which I draw in AutoCad and then print out at a scale of 1:1 to make templates for full sized curves and other such components. I could do the same to make templates for the components for building models if I had the plans as .dwg or .dxf files. Would it be possible to obtain a copy of Werewolf in this format? That way I could still print out the component parts and paste them onto the balsa etc to cut on my scroll saw. If not how should I go about transferring the lines for the bits from the drawing in order to preserve the original and still use expendable copies to paste and cut. Would I have to trace them from the original? That would seam a bit Dickensian in the digital age.

I understand the copyright situation, but would it be feasible to have some sort of CAD club where a covering fee would allow the downloading of these types of drawings so as those lucky enough to have the access to the facility can benefit.

I realise what a Wally I look making such a fundamental error but I look forward to your comments Peter, as to how we can combine the traditional building skills with the available technology that would help the building beginners like me to get up and running.

Cheers

Colin

  

                                                        

Peter Miller06/07/2008 12:21:00
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10529 forum posts
1246 photos
10 articles

Dear Colin.

I am really sorry that you had all the problems. Know just how sickening these things can be.

Personally I would have a full size photcopy of the plan done. Most towns have a office supply shop that can copy up to AO size. My local small country market town has two.

I always draw the larger parts by laying the plan down over the wood and using carbon papers. I di this for the fuselage sides and tail surfaces.

The way I do the sides is this. I lay the handwriting carbon paper dow, then I lay the plan over the top. I drive a couple of pins in along the top edge of the fuselage side and then I can slider the wood up to the pins. IT is now aligned with the top fo the fuselage side.

DO MAKE SURE that it is up against both pins and over laps the end of the fuselage at both ends. yes, I have done all the errors.

There are several methods of marking out the parts. You can lay the photcopied parts down over the wood and either iron them down with a hot iron. Not always the best mark. You lay them down in the same way and rub solvent such as thinners onto the paper and that will transfer the ink to the wood. I use Acetone.

 These day I use my all in one PSC  and copy the parts onto A4 size self adhesive labels. My printer seems to copy to the same size but there is scope for adjustments if I need to. Altarnatively  You could use a copier in a local shop.

If you have the whole plan copied you can just cut bits of the copy out and stick them down.

The designer holds the copyright of the plan, not the magazine. As far as this designer is concerned you are welcome to copy the plan in any way you like for the purpose of building the model.

I hope this helps. If you need any more help just let me know.

Peter

Jim Carss06/07/2008 16:56:00
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2077 forum posts
82 photos

Colin

You can have my copy of the plan for a small fee and a couple of pints,if you get in a knot again just call and the old man will sort you out.

JIm

COLIN MILNE07/07/2008 20:49:00
27 forum posts

Thanks Peter,

Some good advise to a novice builder. I like the Acetone idea as I swim arround in the stuff at work!.

I will have a play with my printer gizmo to see if I can sort out the copy scale settings. I am determined to build Werewolf so I'll get back to you when I cock up something else.

Jim,

Thanks for the offer i'll probably take you up on that, but as I remember things wern't you tea total???

One of my clubmates at Gateshead also fly's up at Cramlington and has threatened to take me up with him over the next few weeks . When I find out I'll give you a call and see if we can meet up.

Cheers Lads

Colin

Jim Carss07/07/2008 22:13:00
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2077 forum posts
82 photos

Colin

I'll look forward to meeting up with you,be nice to see you again,one thing,bring a bottle of Dalwhinnie with you and i'll show you who is tee total bonny lad

JIm

Peter Miller08/07/2008 08:11:00
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10529 forum posts
1246 photos
10 articles

I can do better with the plans. If you can send me £5 I will get copies of my orginal two sheet drawings printed off for you, now more trying to overlap bits and pieces. or build two wings over one drawing. And you can use them with the acetone.

I worked in a similar palce once. We extracted essential oils and flavours etc. There was a bit of panic when the local farm burnt the stubble off the field next to the huge acetone tanks.

 Send me your email address and I will email you my postage address.

Peter Miller08/07/2008 08:11:00
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10529 forum posts
1246 photos
10 articles
PS with regard to the plan, I can also take Pay Pal.
Ken Latam09/07/2008 06:02:00
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102 forum posts

Here is My way of copying from plans. I built a Trace Table made out of scrap 2x4 lumber with a light  under a layer of 1/4 inch plexi glass.  Low sticky tape to hold the plan in place then tape a piece of printer paper over the part to be traced. turn on the light an BINGO  the plan shows thru  like a  charm. a soft  pencil and straight edge and your done. cut out the traceing from the printer paper, a light mist of 3M adheisive then cut out the piece with a final sanding down the the proper size.

http://i281.photobucket.com/albums/kk210/wayupyonder/TraceBoard005.jpg

Ken Latam09/07/2008 06:03:00
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102 forum posts

Plan lay out.

http://i281.photobucket.com/albums/kk210/wayupyonder/TraceBoard009.jpg

 

Ken Latam09/07/2008 06:04:00
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102 forum posts

Close up

http://i281.photobucket.com/albums/kk210/wayupyonder/TraceBoard011.jpg

 

Ken Latam09/07/2008 06:07:00
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102 forum posts

Colin. You should be able to build a right facy one with 3  or 4 lights as is will work much better.

Good luck on the build.

Ken 

Peter Miller09/07/2008 08:11:00
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10529 forum posts
1246 photos
10 articles
I built some when I worked at a school. You can get opalescent perspex (White) and two or three small fluorescent tubes. They work well. Not really sure that it is wroth the effort myself.
COLIN MILNE09/07/2008 21:17:00
27 forum posts

stuff me guys , if i wanted to play with light boxes I would have taken up photography as a hobby,

Realy though thanks for the info. they all sound like good ideas.

However I still fancy the idea of plotting out from a CAD file. How about it Peter,  any thoughts on putting your designs onto a CD disk so as i could print out the bits I need to cut the components and save the planet by not cutting down trees and harnessing mercury gasses in flossy tubes to make a light box. Or am I loosing the plot when it comes down to the traditional methods?.

I take it by the Quality of your drawings you use a CAD package to produce the drawings.

I guess I may be lazy by wanting the easy way out but with a CAD file you could scale up or down if the fancy took you.

answers on a postcard please

Jim Carss09/07/2008 21:39:00
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2077 forum posts
82 photos

Colin

you're getting far too technical,trace the parts onto thin card using carbon paper that you nicked from Formica,cut out the templates and draw round them straight onto the wood.Job done

By the time you debate all these methods the plane could have been built by the old man.

Forgot to tell you,Cramlington club are hosting the Geordie Nats.on Sunday 31st. August so get your bum into gear and get along.

Jim

COLIN MILNE09/07/2008 22:12:00
27 forum posts

Jim,

Thin card?  I've still got 407 sheets of Buff Lynette   from staff sales , would that do?

I still fancy clicking the plot button with my mouse and letting the computer do all the laborius tracing duties. 

But I will get the build underway trhis week.

I would have loved to go to the Geordie Nats but I will be towing my hut on wheels around Ireland with the one who must be obeyed.

I still facy a visit with my mate from g'head though so I will be up over the next few weeks.

Colin

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