By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by CML

Hornby at risk?

Our valued yesteryears

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
IanN10/02/2016 23:31:02
avatar
1675 forum posts
119 photos

Shares fell by 50% today following the latest in a series of profits warnings

Why should we care? Well, aswell as (obviously) model railways, the Hornby group also includes Airfix and Scalextric (aswell as earlier names such as Tri-ang Trains, Minic Motorways, etc)

Perish the thought that these brands should disappear - I spent a considerable portion of my youth, as I suspect many of us did, accidentally gluing myself to various components of many, many, Airfix kits

Maybe they haven't moved with the times enough but then again, I did take issue with the radio journalist I just heard say Hornby were "too attached to their legacy".

If that's the case then good for them for sticking up for and preserving what's important.thumbs up Legacy matters.

Here's hoping they can find a way through it without ditching their rich and proud heritage - laser firing, warp drive, exploding Flying Scotsman set, anyone?

Tom Sharp 211/02/2016 00:30:03
avatar
3592 forum posts
19 photos

Trying to do too much?

Over 200 different engines, hundreds of different rolling stock, three different levels of scale fidelity and price and so on.

How many dealers can stock all of this?

Plus model railways are the last thing kiddy winkies want. It's a pensioners hobby nowadays.

In fact a laser firing, warp drive, exploding Flying Scotsman, sounds like a brilliant product

Jon - Laser Engines11/02/2016 09:08:58
4992 forum posts
200 photos

I think it is a sad reflection on the state of modelling. I used to spend hours with airfix kits but very few kids do it these days. Xbox is more 'fun' and more convenient for them. Its all about instant gratification.

That said, its not entirely the kids fault. Many parents would go into meltdown at the idea of giving an 8 year old a modelling scalpel, polystyrene cement, enamel paints and thinners and then allow him to lock himself in his room for the next 6 hours and build models.......oh i used to love christmas day...

Anyway, even if the parents didnt mind all that they would have to be dragged to the shop, get the paint and glue because little timmy is not allowed and so on. Its far easier to plonk him in front of the xbox and not worry about it.

I know that when i have kids they will get lego as their primary toy as it is a superb thing and i think promotes the creativity needed for model building. I wont ban computer games, but equally i dont want my 3 year old playing games on his smart phone (no 3 year old needs a phone btw).

SO yes, it will be a sad thing if they go but i do not know what can be done other than a mandatory model building class in all primary schools! :D

Cuban811/02/2016 10:30:22
2824 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by IanN on 10/02/2016 23:31:02:

Shares fell by 50% today following the latest in a series of profits warnings

Why should we care? Well, aswell as (obviously) model railways, the Hornby group also includes Airfix and Scalextric (aswell as earlier names such as Tri-ang Trains, Minic Motorways, etc)

Perish the thought that these brands should disappear - I spent a considerable portion of my youth, as I suspect many of us did, accidentally gluing myself to various components of many, many, Airfix kits

Maybe they haven't moved with the times enough but then again, I did take issue with the radio journalist I just heard say Hornby were "too attached to their legacy".

If that's the case then good for them for sticking up for and preserving what's important.thumbs up Legacy matters.

Here's hoping they can find a way through it without ditching their rich and proud heritage - laser firing, warp drive, exploding Flying Scotsman set, anyone?

 

Typical ludicrous management speak "too attached to their legacy" - by which they mean, I suppose, 'old fashioned'angry.

Shame about Airfix and the like, but I was surprised at how expensive even a simple 1/72 Spitfire kit is today - around seven or eight quid, so hardly pocket money prices anymore.


I used to get half a crown a week pocket money and that would buy me one 1/72 WW2 fighter kit with about a shilling left over which was plenty. A decent collection of models for your bedroom  would easily cost a couple of hundred pounds now - perhaps 'I'm too attached to my legacy' as wellwink

Edited By Cuban8 on 11/02/2016 10:45:42

Robin Colbourne11/02/2016 11:34:23
avatar
465 forum posts
6 photos
Posted by IanN on 10/02/2016 23:31:02:

If that's the case then good for them for sticking up for and preserving what's important.thumbs up Legacy matters.

Here's hoping they can find a way through it without ditching their rich and proud heritage - laser firing, warp drive, exploding Flying Scotsman set, anyone?

That would be the Battle Space series then! :laugh There were wagons which launched satellites, catapult gliders, helicopters, artillery rockets and an exploding box car. There was even one propeller propelled 'loco' (see below). I'm sure most wouldn't get past today's elf 'n' safety lot, but they were great!

Edited By Robin Colbourne on 11/02/2016 11:37:11

Edited By Robin Colbourne on 11/02/2016 11:37:43

Kevin Wilson11/02/2016 13:06:40
avatar
386 forum posts
13 photos
Posted by Jon Harper - Laser Engines on 11/02/2016 09:08:58:

(no 3 year old needs a phone btw).

Absolutely Jon, most 3 year olds seem to get plonked in front of mummy (or daddies) phone... when there isn't a TV to be a surrogate parent of course.

There was a recent string of posts on Facebook where a young lad was wanting to go fly but couldn't get to the field.
My parents would have seen it as supporting their child to accompany and support me.
Similarly I spent a few hours outside my daughters guitar lesson last night reading RCM&E. I am a father its what I do.

Unfortunately I seem to be very much in the minority.

Jon - Laser Engines11/02/2016 13:29:40
4992 forum posts
200 photos

we actually had a guy come up the field with his very enthusiastic son and when he asked about how training was managed, and found out then that it was mostly done at weekends, he responded 'oh well i play football saturday and go out with the guys on sunday. Can i drop him off and pick him up later?' We then explained that an unguarded 10 year old was not something we were dealing with so he said 'thanks anyway' then grabbed the kid and scarpered! 

I think he was looking for somewhere to offload said child so he could do whatever he wanted.

Edited By Jon Harper - Laser Engines on 11/02/2016 13:31:43

mightypeesh11/02/2016 14:27:59
avatar
679 forum posts
892 photos
Posted by Jon Harper - Laser Engines on 11/02/2016 09:08:58:

I think it is a sad reflection on the state of modelling. I used to spend hours with airfix kits but very few kids do it these days. Xbox is more 'fun' and more convenient for them. Its all about instant gratification.

That said, its not entirely the kids fault. Many parents would go into meltdown at the idea of giving an 8 year old a modelling scalpel, polystyrene cement, enamel paints and thinners..

8 years old..... Yep that would be about right for when I filleted my left index finger with a stanley knife whilst building an Airfix kit.

Lots of blood, a trip to hospital and five stitches later I got to carry on with it... laugh Those were the days.

Cheers, Simon

Kevin Wilson11/02/2016 15:11:07
avatar
386 forum posts
13 photos

And thats how we learnt that knives are sharp and to be very careful with them.

Kevin Wilson11/02/2016 15:21:03
avatar
386 forum posts
13 photos

Swerving wildly back to the OP.
It would be a shame to see the end of Hornby and Airfix.

It is a different world and children do not see the joy in creating something themselves. We are in a very market led consumer society.
As a majority our society seems to be very happy passive receptors of others professional (salaried) creativity.

I heard a survey a few days back that modern men are unable to fix a dripping tap and such minor domestic repairs. A young man that I cycled to Paris with asked if any of the group could repair a puncture as he didn' have the first clue.

So what chance a creative pastime such as model railways and airfix?

IanN11/02/2016 16:10:25
avatar
1675 forum posts
119 photos
Posted by Kevin Wilson on 11/02/2016 15:11:07:

And thats how we learnt that knives are sharp and to be very careful with them.

And also that glue smelled quite nice !

Jon Laughton11/02/2016 18:08:04
avatar
1181 forum posts
72 photos

Its a real shame if Airfix is lost (again)....they were the centre of my universe before girls and beer took over!

I still have quite a few unmade kits from over 40 years ago that I am promising myself to build in retirement and have bought one or two specials from them for just that reason in the last few years (Vulcan / Nimrod / larger scale Concorde) which emphasises what has already been said - these days it's a nostalgic hobby not for the playstation generations....same can be said for model railways I think?

Ah....the odours of Humbrol enamel, polystyrene cement, body putty and fresh sprue really can take me back to the days when I still had original hips and no rheumatism! I can only hope that the shareholders and management team come through his difficult period...

Edited By Jon Laughton on 11/02/2016 18:08:41

Tom Sharp 211/02/2016 19:12:55
avatar
3592 forum posts
19 photos

I downloaded the company annual report today. Basically things do not seem too bad, BUT, they have not paid any dividend for several years.

Erfolg11/02/2016 19:50:43
avatar
11502 forum posts
1259 photos

I recently supervised grad daughter No.2 construct a 1/72 Airfix BAE Hawk. Certainly not suitable build for an old codger, as the thing is so tiny. As Cuban8 points out that ia about £8 for a tiny model, that does at least come with paint. Perhaps that is part of the reason so few are sold.

I am having reservations of undertaking a build of a flying model with her, as has been pointed out , Swan Morton scalpels are pretty sharp. When i started i only had a Gillette Blue razor blade, that was well used, in some ways more of a risk, in that relatively small nicks were the norm. This was due to the difficulty of both holding, and that in comparison getting any real force on them was limited. All of which resulted in numerous trivial nicks, rather than digit threatening cuts.

In my childhood, train sets were limited in availability, and quite expensive, but that was probably the ultimate toy. Thankfully today far more varied toys and things are available. Even sweets were rationed from memory, as was so much else.

Perhaps i am not so up set that Hornby are not the must have makers of toys any more. Perhaps with the other changes in society they as relevant as Mecarno is in a Lego World.

Steve Adams11/02/2016 21:12:02
194 forum posts

Even when I was growing up in the 80s Hornby train sets particularly the 125,Mallard,Flying Scotsman were very much in vogue I had the 125. The best/Rarest. Train set to have was the A.P.T(Advanced Passenger Train) Hornby never made many owing to the short service life due to technical issues with the real one. I do hope that things can be turned around as just the same as Rolls Royce in the 70s getting bailed out by British Government its to important to lose,I also said that about MG/Rover in 2005 but the Internet and change of ways and attitude has changed and sadly it'll be an uphill struggle to pull things back up even if that's at all possible! I wish them good luck and hope they can stick around for many years to come. Every remember the boy getting the signal box for his dad's model railway from the yellow pages advert?

Cheers

Steve smiley

Lindsay Todd11/02/2016 23:34:37
avatar
1703 forum posts
1707 photos

Very sad, what can they do, well I suggest they take a look at Lego, there is a company that holds on tightly to its core values and looks to the future. Why could Hornby not do the same, if I were on the board then I would be having conversations with the likes of these people to gain a wider perspective and new direction with loosing its traditional strength. Come to think of it the potential tie in between Lego and Hornby could be huge. just a though on a more positive vane. Linds

Rich too12/02/2016 09:57:39
avatar
3057 forum posts
1070 photos

This is all very well, but we didn't have Xboxes when we were kids - its easy to judge. My son lives on his Xbox - and talks to his friends at the same time (whilst as a teenager I was locked up alone building my planes). However, he is active outside, with football on Saturdays and Sundays.

I also think it is a bit rich of some of you to judge the parents. I take my son to training on Saturdays and leave him there for another parent to pick him up. I watch the games on Sundays. However, in my day my parents never did this - I had to do whatever they did - so every weekend was spent sailing, when I just wanted to be at home with my mates.

It appears to be a modern thing for parents to run kids around everywhere doing every conceivable activity.

As for Hornby, yes, it will be a shame, but they are obviously failing with product development. Lego is different, it is aimed at a younger age group. Most youngers/toddler get Lego for birthdays etc. That does not mean they will develop into other creative hobbies. Hornby is generally for older kids/granddad.

You cannot stop the development of technology and you cannot determine the path your kids follow - I build/fly planes but neither of my kids show any interest. so long as they are happy, who cares? wink

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited By Rich2 on 12/02/2016 09:59:14

Simon B12/02/2016 11:28:24
avatar
1936 forum posts
284 photos
If I was a kid considering getting into our hobby and saw the numerous threads blanket labelling kids, I think it'd put me off!
Simon B12/02/2016 11:29:59
avatar
1936 forum posts
284 photos
For the record, I'm in my late 30s, build models and own a Playstation 4. Is there a pigeonhole for that?

Edited By Simon B on 12/02/2016 11:31:57

Tom Sharp 212/02/2016 22:53:45
avatar
3592 forum posts
19 photos

I am in my 70's, don't own a PlayStation and no longer build models, just fly.

Where do I fit in?

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of RCM&E? Use our magazine locator link to find your nearest stockist!

Find RCM&E! 

Support Our Partners
Pepe Aircraft
electricwingman 2017
Wings & Wheels 2019
Gliders Distribution
CML
Slec
Cambridge Gliding Club
Advertise With Us
Sarik
Latest "For Sale" Ads
Do you use a throttle kill switch?
Q: This refers to electric-powered models but do you use a throttle kill switch?

 Yes
 No
 Sometimes
 Rarely

Latest Reviews
Digital Back Issues

RCM&E Digital Back Issues

Contact us

Contact us