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Aircraft Restraints

What do you use?

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Alan B22/03/2008 13:24:00
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680 forum posts
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Please forgive me if this has been covered in another thread.  As aircraft have to be restrained for starting up engines - as I presume that all clubs now are enforcing this rule.  Unfortunately as I have led a sheltered life and due to weather conditions, lack of time etc  to visit my clubs Aeroplane section - as I have only flown Helicopters at the other side of the airfield  I haven't actually seen this done or the methods used.

Please can any members tell me how they normally  secure their models down when starting their ic engines.

regards   Al

Bruce Richards22/03/2008 13:45:00
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1849 forum posts

I made up a Y shaped stake out of 15mm copper tube with foam pipe lagging. I push this into the ground and insert the fuselage in it so that it retrains the tail and stops t he model moving forward. I if forget this I use a loop of string around the tail and under the fuselage tied to my car or to a screwdriver pushed into the ground.

Bob Cotsford22/03/2008 13:53:00
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I've got two U shaped ply plates attached to my flight box for general fettling and starting smalland medium sized models, and a Y shaped bracket soldered up from plumbing fittings and copper tube for the bigger beasts, but the copper pipe prong bit really needs reinforcing to stop it bending in hard ground.

1/4" steel wire bent and welded into a Y is popular up our club,  covered in foam pipe lagging retaines with cable ties of course 

Alan B22/03/2008 23:25:00
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680 forum posts
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Thanks Bob and Bruce  those methods would do nicely. I have lots of copper pipe and fittings in my garage from various plumbing jobs in the past so I will knock one up in the near future.

Thanks again for your advice

regards  Al

Doug Ireland23/03/2008 10:05:00
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I use a full-size aircraft picketing (have I spelt that right?) screw and then a "Y" piece that hooks over the wing leading edges... then let 'er rip!!!
Chris Beer23/03/2008 14:00:00
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104 forum posts
i use a bungee and or the 2 halves of my flight box.
David Ashby - Moderator23/03/2008 14:02:00
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I use a Y shaped thing that pushed into the ground. Chap was selling them at the Nats for a fiver....bargain!
Alan B23/03/2008 19:05:00
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680 forum posts
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I suppose from your comments (thanks)  The Y shaped thing/setup sounds like a larger version of a Fishing Rod  - Rod Rest.
Nicholas Booth24/03/2008 00:10:00
90 forum posts
11 photos

If you visit your local pets store ( the larger one in the retail parks) and look in their Dog section you find a corkscrew device with a sprung loaded swivel catch on it selling for a whopping 3.99. The biggest plane I fly runs a saito 125 and it doesn't even tickle it

Mike Stevens24/03/2008 09:08:00
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I am fairly new to IC and chose to use two copper pipes with plastic ferrels on the top to save the hand and clad in pipe insulation driven into the ground in front of the stab either side of the fuselage. My one concern with this and other methods of restraint like this is the ability, all be it unconciously, to move the aircraft backwards away from the restraint and then when the engine starts there is some slack and it can leap forward causing injury. I think one of the magazines or forums recently had a photo/text of some injuries gained this way. I am trying to figure out a way of preventing this - I suppose two more restaints behind the training edge of the wing but then the is a potential for damage and it wouldn't fit each model so would have to be adjustable. A length of broom handle behind the wheels? or a section of guttering to put the wheels in?  I am still pondering.

When starting I tend to have a hand on the nose to hold the aircraft and use a chciken stick but then you have an arm in the prop arc - possibly not a good idea.

Any other thoughts?

Regards

Mike

Bob Cotsford24/03/2008 09:57:00
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8754 forum posts
489 photos

You could build some elaborate combination of front and rear stops, but what happens when you have more than one model? Do you build them all the the same length? Wheel restraints are no good for taildraggers as they'll just pivot round the wheels and bite you ar the ground. Possible for a trike though, as long as your models all have the same track width.

you can't eliminate all risks, sometimes it has to come down to good working practices. Before you stuff the starter on the pointy bit, pull the model forward against the restraint.

I tend to stuff my flight box behind the wing so that the model can't roll back, but it doesn't do the T/E much good if you are heavy-handed with the starter. It does help to keep the glow and starter cable out of the way though.

Myron Beaumont24/03/2008 12:37:00
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5797 forum posts
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Never used a restraint in 55 years- Ever !

 I have all my fingers and they are important as I am a musician! Nanny state rears its ugly head again and I'll have to remember the name of my 'baccy being as "they" are going to hide it under the counter ! What next for Gods sake ? Can't stand "chicken sticks "either --No feel factor .Sorry but the "need more rules  people" get right up my nose

Grumpy Myron( but still in one piece thanks to that old fashioned thing called common sense and being aware of danger & taking due care & attention  Over to you all

Eric Bray24/03/2008 14:16:00
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6600 forum posts
2 photos

Gravity restrains my models, nowadays. Electrics don't need it, because they cannot bite if the battery is disconnected.

When I used to fly methanol burners, I never used a restrainer of any kind. Common sense rules?! If something happened where take-off was delayed, I'd stop the engine, and restart it later.

I never used an electric starter, although I did try a clockwork one, cannot recall the manufacturer, but it was a waste of time. (and money!) Like Myron, I preferred to 'feel' my engines. The only one I ever broke tried to 'eat' concrete! (See the Yamamoto thread!)

Myron Beaumont24/03/2008 14:33:00
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5797 forum posts
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Eric    I'm worried that we might be the last generation of REAL modellers .Learn as you go if you know what I mean.I'm in a really fed up mood today & sick & tired of  the attitude of "they" .Over to our efficient Chinese friends !  By the way ( off thread ) Did you know that a boomerang behaves in space exactly as in our atmosphere ? Thinking of sweepback/ dihedral /moments of inertia/ etc. etc .Your thoughts areanticipated

Grumpy

Alan B24/03/2008 18:28:00
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680 forum posts
92 photos

Hi Myron and Eric

I tend to agree - when I fly in my girlfriends field I have never used one or at any time in the past. However at my local club they wont let you fly apparently.  This only came to light a few months ago when a certain member crashed his jet on one side of the airfield and another non flying club doing a totally different activity, complained to the authorities. Once the incident had been sorted all Health and Safety issues came into force.  The first I heard of it was before I left the site one day.  I went across to have a nosey and a chat with the FW flyers and a member came up to me and asked me If I had any rope or string in the car.  When I asked him why.  He said he needed it to lash his plane down or he couldn't fly. At first I thought he was winding me up!  So hence thats why Ive now asked this question.

I suppose it wont be long before we will all have  to wear crash helmets and goggles while re fueling and flying.  Well having said that the control line boys do!

Again many thanks for the replies

Al

flytilbroke24/03/2008 21:35:00
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2083 forum posts
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I have not seen "luggage straps" mentioned, very useful quick connect and release buckle thing. Used instead of String

Many modelers over the years have got away with no injury when a model was unrestrained, but, many more have been injured, some very badly when one was not used. Rmember all restraints only work when the model is tight against them.

The Nanny state has given us safer vehicles, Seat belts which save lives and MANY severe injuries. Daft argument to blame common sense guidance

Bob Cotsford24/03/2008 22:46:00
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8754 forum posts
489 photos

The Nanny state has also made many activities over-regulated and over-expensive. It's legislated the fun factor out of everything it's touched and has become the curse of mankind by bringing everything down to the level of the lowest . i also know I'm right in this because Jeremy Clarkson agrees with me, and frequently makes just this point on Top Gear.

Can we please learn the difference between risk elimination and risk management. ie - the impossible and the possible.

Mike Stevens25/03/2008 07:44:00
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464 forum posts
57 photos

I would have thought that aircraft restraints fall into exactly that category - common sense risk management? I have only just come back into aero modelling in the last three years - used to play with PAW 19 dielsels at the age of 14 - pretty risky. The difference I have notice is that the standard size club engine now is around 40-60 size or larger whereas thrity years ago we thought 35 were large and proabably the common sizes were 25's? I don't kknow -  just an impression and power outputs would haev gone up also - maybe just moving with the times?

Mike

Nicholas Booth25/03/2008 07:55:00
90 forum posts
11 photos

I understand with many of the curses of the nanny state we currently live in but the model restraint has been enforced within my club for a long time now. Whilst I can happily state that I don't feel I have ever needed it, on more than one occasion I have seen 'do what it says on the tin' when a throttle has been left to far open etc.

 I would guess that most of these mishaps would have come to nothing more than a few bruises but with bigger and bigger planes coming out  they are for the that 'single occasion' when insanity takes over from competency, and in the scheme of things, they don't cost a lot if you look around and it is normallu your 'knackers' sitting not too far from that spinning prop..............need I say more

Bob Cotsford25/03/2008 14:11:00
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8754 forum posts
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I've no argument with the encouragement of common sense measures, just with legislating for it. Take the use of mobile phones when driving, for example. There are many situations where using a mobile while driving is at the very least suicidal, at worst murderous. Then again there are plenty of situations where it should be acceptable to answer a call - on a deserted motorway, or in static traffic. The exceptions could be dealt with under 'driving without due care and attention' but the control freaks in government went overboard and made it illegal to sit within 200 yards of a comms device while in a motorised vehicle, the penalty being to be beheaded or something like that.

My club strongly encourages the use of a restraint, and I'd always recommend the use of one . I've come perilously close to doing myself a serious injury squatting in front of a .60 powered model and inadvertantly knocking the throttle stick....

However, restraints still need to be used with care, as pointed out in a previous post, improper use, ie pushing the model back, away from the restraint, means it serves no purpose whatsoever.

Can anyone tell it's a slow day at work?

ps - any suggestions on how to make restraints for hand launched models, such as my small flying wings? 

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