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Where to fuel proof Acro Wot ARTF & is this the right stuff?

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Jonathan M15/09/2016 12:29:27
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669 forum posts
275 photos

Hi

Putting together my first IC plane, an Acro Wot balsa ARTF to be powered by a 70FS, and would appreciate some advice on fuel proofing.

Firstly, I've bought a 125ml tim of Spectra Enamel Gloss Fuel Proofer. Is the right stuff? Will it adhere to the film covering directly and will it sit on or soak into bare balsa?

Secondly, how extensively to I need to apply the proofing? Just in and around the engine bay and forward part of the fuselage, or right through its innards and out along the wings as well?

Thanks

Jon

Phil 915/09/2016 13:13:07
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4281 forum posts
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I bought an acro wot recently and it is already fuel proofed where it need to be. It probably would not hurt to add more fuel proofing in the tank bay but getting it in there seems more trouble than its worth on this model.

Edited By Phil 9 on 15/09/2016 13:25:55

Tim Flyer15/09/2016 13:23:18
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1012 forum posts
172 photos

The film on ARTFs is basically fuel proof anyway. I tend to paint the inside of the cowling which is often unfinished glass fibre with epoxy and the firewall/ engine mount area. The fuel bay is a good idea too. While you are at it reinforcing the cowl with extra matting in stress areas works well too . If you do not have thin epoxy for the job it is possible to thin standard "deluxe epoxy resin" that many modellers use with methylated spirits so it is easy to brush. Obviously mix it well before adding methylated spirit. Spectra fuel proofer seems ok with low nitro fuels and I use it on my spitfire fuselage . However for engine bays and tank areas that can and do get a permanent oil/fuel soaking epoxy is best. Ps don't forget to wear gloves for epoxy use !

Edited By Timothy Harris 1 on 15/09/2016 13:24:43

Edited By Timothy Harris 1 on 15/09/2016 13:48:59

ken anderson.15/09/2016 15:17:02
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8428 forum posts
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hello Jonathan.....deffo do the firewall, pay attention to the where the film is ironed down and make sure it gets a dose of fuel proofer...worth while running the iron over the front area covering seams......don't bother with any proofer on the inside of the fibre glass cowl.....i'm not sure if the A/Wot ARTF comes with the fuel proofing done...if it does don't bother with the inside of the fuel tank bay......with a 70 F/S you'll have a nice model there....

ken Anderson...ne...1 A/Wot dept.

Tim Flyer15/09/2016 15:43:36
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1012 forum posts
172 photos

Ken why I paint inside of fibreglass cowl is that the surface is often unfinished dry matting. If you have need to repair it and have not proofed it , you will have a bigger job degreasing it plus putting in a bit of matting in weak areas near cut outs and bolt holes is a good idea. While you are painting the firewall with epoxy spending 5 minutes doing the inside of the cowl is hardly excessive? Painting it with epoxy makes it a nice smooth wipe clean surface . Normally most of us have spare epoxy after mixing up anyway.

ken anderson.15/09/2016 17:16:34
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8428 forum posts
772 photos

hello timothy....we all have our own methods for doing things, my mentioning that there is no need to fuel proof the inside of the GF cowling isn't saying what you do isn't correct etc...... we all do things different....

ken Anderson...ne...1.... F/Proofing dept..

onetenor15/09/2016 23:19:15
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1900 forum posts
Posted by Jonathan M on 15/09/2016 12:29:27:

Hi

Putting together my first IC plane, an Acro Wot balsa ARTF to be powered by a 70FS, and would appreciate some advice on fuel proofing.

Firstly, I've bought a 125ml tim of Spectra Enamel Gloss Fuel Proofer. Is the right stuff? Will it adhere to the film covering directly and will it sit on or soak into bare balsa?

Secondly, how extensively to I need to apply the proofing? Just in and around the engine bay and forward part of the fuselage, or right through its innards and out along the wings as well?

Thanks

Jon

Jon I see nobody fully answered your queries. The Spectra ED proofer is good stuff.Re bare balsa any paint will soak into balsa to some extent.The tninner it is the more it will soak in, I can't comment re it's effect on film.Personally I would do as much of the fuse as possible as far back as possible. That stuff ( fuel ) gets everywhere Do the wings bare wood and into first bay or two. ( before covering   is best especially if two piece wings and exterior about 1/2 the span and full length of fuse and fin and tailplane.Just my way of doing . Hope I helped Jon Regards John

ASH.16/09/2016 00:17:58
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300 forum posts

Jonathan,

I use Solarfilm Clearcoat (clear synthetic resin) as fuelproofer. The 'old timers' have been using it for decades and I find it works well for me. In engine bay and firewall I would put on a couple of coats regardless if already done at factory. A good coat on inside of firewall and tank bay is a must. Also a thin coat on any exposed balsa and ply in fuselage/wing doesn't hurt. It strenghtens the wood, protects and keeps clean from fuel/oil from exhaust etc.

Also, I would go over ALL film edges throughout with Clearcoat with a fine brush. It's time consuming but it stops the film lifting due to fuel/oil ingress. 'If a job's worth doing...'

Good luck. You're going to enjoy flying with the IC engine.

trebor16/09/2016 07:23:31
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1905 forum posts
214 photos

yes for Clearcoat, I do exactly the same as Ash.

Jonathan M16/09/2016 07:43:02
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669 forum posts
275 photos

Thanks to all for the advice. Yes to the following:

* really looking forward to flying with (mid-size four-stroke) IC.

* getting inside the fuel-bay on this one will require an articulating paintbrush!

* will certainly iron down and seal covering, and fuel-proof all zones of potential ingress.

* gloved-up and twin-tubes ready.

* 'If a job's worth doing' ...is why my whole life takes me so long! laugh

Cheers, Jon

Edited By Jonathan M on 16/09/2016 07:43:27

Edited By Jonathan M on 16/09/2016 07:44:45

Phil 916/09/2016 08:10:35
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4281 forum posts
224 photos
Posted by ASH. on 16/09/2016 00:17:58

. A good coat on inside of firewall and tank bay is a must.

Not so easy to do on the acro wot artf as access is limited

Edited By Phil 9 on 16/09/2016 08:10:54

Charles Smitheman16/09/2016 08:32:13
226 forum posts
18 photos

+1 for Clearcoat, on wood and film. Quick, easy, dries fast, no mixing. Does not add weight like epoxy..

Epoxy is also excellent but has a short shelf life. The stuff I bought last has a nominal one year shelf life, but the hardener is already going brown after a few months. It has to be stored correctly too. Not too hot or too cold. I hate the mess when working with it.

I have also had excellent results with Poly C, but it needs many coats and is slow drying. Water based, no odour is the big advantage.

Had no success with Spectrum fuel proofer some years back, but it may have been a dud batch It dissolved and peeled off where fuel got to it. But the Spectrum / Spectra paint is great.

For awkward to get to areas bend a paintbrush at the metal bit to an L shape...

Hope this helps.

Charles

alan p16/09/2016 08:42:24
223 forum posts
3 photos

Use silicone sealant round the neck of the fuel tank to seal the tank bay. A bead round the tank neck then push the tank into place seals of the aperture nicely. I have had the tank bung blow out twice and this stopped fuel entering the fuselage. Have now replaced bung with a better quality one with a metal retaining cap but have still sealed with silicone.

trebor16/09/2016 08:59:14
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1905 forum posts
214 photos

Sooner or later your going to get problems with standard fuel tanks, Kavan or Dupro are the way to go. If the engine is mounted tight against firewall or for whatever reason you can't push tank through I have put foam 28mm pipe insulation round the neck just to stop engine vapours getting blown back into the fuselage. Also helps protect pipes sticking out of the bung and prevents vibration rubbing.

Engine Doctor16/09/2016 09:01:09
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2272 forum posts
25 photos

Another yes for Clearcoat . If you need to thin it ,up to 10% or clean brushes then cellulose thinner is fine . The enamel fuel proofers like spectra can yellow with age and look gruby.they generally take a long time to dry and cure before being fuel proof/resistant . No fuel proofers really adhere to the glossy side of covering films very well but its not really needed as the film is fuel proof. The edges are vulnerable to fuel residue creeping under the covering and as already suggested ,give the edges a good coat. If you want the Clearcoat to adhere to the glossy film then give it a coat of "Prymol" its made by Solarfilm for use with Clearcoat and Solarlac colours. It is also heat activated and will really stick covering to any balsa when covering or recovering you do .Do allow it to dry thoroughly before covering. It works very well with solarfilm but not all coverings Clearcoat is quick drying but the vapours do smell very stongly so use in a well ventilated area or bear the wrath of the family! I would also give the tank bay a good coat of Clearcoat as any leaks will ruin the model

ken anderson.16/09/2016 10:40:13
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8428 forum posts
772 photos

here's mine--OS 91 F/S...ARTB one...compared to the ARTF version....its very strong and can be modded as you build it....

wot and blackie2

ken Anderson...ne....1 ARTB WOT dept.

Tim Flyer16/09/2016 13:01:10
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1012 forum posts
172 photos

I like that Ken! Good colour scheme! I'm a fan of black and white 2 tone or is it dark Blue/white. My eyes have trouble differentiating .

Edited By Timothy Harris 1 on 16/09/2016 13:03:39

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