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Hawker Hurricane by John Timmis

Build of the Brian Taylor Hurricane & conversion to electric

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John Timmis18/09/2016 15:07:07
222 forum posts
266 photos

Hi everyone, I've been meaning to do this for ages. This is follow on to my Chipmunk build. So, having survived the Chipmunk experience, this is my attempt to raise the bar a little higher & to try & apply some of the lessons learned.

The chipmunk build was nearing completion & I was starting to think 'What next'. At this time I met Danny (Greenacres 15) & during the conversation about Chippies I said that I fancied a Hurricane next. He produced, from the back of his car, a fabulous Hurricane. 'You would enjoy one of these'. So the decision was made there & then, a Brian Taylor Hurricane, encouraged (egged on) by Danny Fenton. Magic.

This will not be a blow by blow description of the build. I an already well on the way with the construction. The build started in January, the Chipmunk was finished, apart from painting but the workshop was too cold, so the Hurricane build began.

These photos show where I am now. Next time I can show some of the steps along the way.

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Cheers John.

Phil 918/09/2016 15:31:54
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4284 forum posts
237 photos

very nice indeed

onetenor18/09/2016 17:48:28
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1900 forum posts

Looking real

Andrew Price 218/09/2016 19:33:19
815 forum posts

Looking good.

Andrew Price 218/09/2016 19:40:45
815 forum posts

Tick the box next time Andy!

John Timmis19/09/2016 22:21:19
222 forum posts
266 photos

image.jpegHi,

The plans were bought at the Cosford show in 15. I already had a 500kv motor that should do the job using the same 6s lipos as on the Chippie. The main thing I was after was a set of electric retracts & sprung u/c legs. I've not done retracts before, that was one of the challenges.

The plans are excellent & are very clearly drawn; they do look very accurate & all the parts fit well. They are a master class in scale modelling construction. I was very impressed.

So work began in Jan. It was too cold to paint the Chipmunk.

Start on the tailplane; do the easy bits first.

I decided that I could do without the lazer cut pack & cut the bits out myself. That way I can select the wood. It takes a bit longer but if you're going to spend a year on a build, a couple of days cutting out parts is nothing.

image.jpeg

The tailplane is standard construction for this type of model. It went together quite quickly. I had some nice 1/4 grain, 1/16 balsa that I used for the sheet core. I was keen to achieve fine trailing edges to the elevators & rudder. The only small change I made was to sand the T/E sheet away to nothing & then add a new 0.4 mm ply T/E. The plan emphasises the need to keep the rear end light so lightening holes will be done later.

That's it for now. Next time: start on the fuselage.

Cheers John.

Colin Leighfield19/09/2016 22:33:27
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5965 forum posts
2494 photos

That really is a beautiful build John. The construction detail looks excellent, I can see why Bryan Taylor designs are so highly rated looking at this one.

John Timmis26/09/2016 22:19:06
222 forum posts
266 photos

Hi

Next up is the basic fuselage. This is all straightforward model construction. Just like a junior 60 really.

Because I'm converting to electric power, the front of the fuselage needed to be extended by about 3, 3/8".A new firewall was cut out from 6mm ply. I put in a few extra diagonal braces into the rear structure. Apart from that it's built exactly as drawn on the plan. Simple enough so far.

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The Hurricane was the 1st monoplane fighter for the RAF. It was also the 1st with such features as retractable uc & eight machine guns. Despite these advanced features it was the final development of a long line of Hawker biplanes. Really almost a monoplane Fury. The fuselage primary structure was made up of high tensile steel tubes, mechanically joined together & braced internally with wires. The external shape was produced with wooden formers & multiple wooden stringers covered with doped fabric. Everything you see of the fuselage behind the windscreen is wood & fabric. Not cutting edge stuff like the stressed skin of a Spitfire, but quick & easy to make & simple to repair. Most of the bullets went straight through.

I really like the fact that the model follows very closely the structure of the original. It's good scale modelling.

The fuselage can be put aside for now & a start made on the wing.

Cheers John

Geoff Sleath26/09/2016 22:41:30
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3492 forum posts
319 photos

It's lovely. What's the wingspan and expected final weight (a target you're guaranteed to miss ). I'm guessing 60" (1.5 metres) at the ws. I have no idea what the likely weight would be.

Geoff

Colin Leighfield27/09/2016 07:22:41
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5965 forum posts
2494 photos

Those who restore and rebuild Hurricanes say that there are four or five times as many man hours in restoring or building a Hurricanr than a Spitfire, because although the structure is simple in principle and localised damage is easy to repair, it is built up of a very large number of jointed pieces that are very labour intensive in assembly. Tooling and set-up costs are low because of the lack of major press work associated with stressed-skin monocoque design and as John says, Hawker were able to build it wholly on existing tooling and equipment. Looking at some of the early Hawker design project drawings, the original Fury monoplane proposal with fixed undercarriage would make a really nice model.

If I ever do a Hurricane though, the BT version is the one for me. The photos in this thread show just how beautiful the structure is and probably similar to the full-size, time-consuming rather than difficult., I've seen Danny's BT Hurricane finished as a Mk1 and don't think I could ever have the patience to produce such a museum standard of detail and accuracy. You never know though, I might live long enough. I'd better finish the Chipmunk first. In the meantime, I'm just going to enjoy watching John showing me how to build a real model aeroplane.

Edited By Colin Leighfield on 27/09/2016 07:26:12

Manish Chandrayan27/09/2016 09:05:05
606 forum posts
70 photos

Lovely work there John. Watching with interest

John Timmis27/09/2016 12:20:43
222 forum posts
266 photos

Hi. Thanks for the comments.

Geoff. The wingspan is 70". Brian Taylor's model was powered by a Lazer 75. It weighed 10lb 2oz ready to fly but with no fuel. I guess that will be the target weight. The plan emphasises the importance of getting the C of G correct & also the necessity to save weight at the rear. It's not a model that is going to turn out nose heavy. Achieving a good weight will depend on how much ballast (none I hope) is required in the nose. At least there is plenty of room for some big batteries.

Colin. You are quite right in what you say about restoring Hurricanes nowadays. At the time, however, the Air Ministry estimated that it took 15,000 man hours to build a Spitfire & 10,000 to build a Hurricane. In other words, you could have 1 1/2 Hurricanes for every Spitfire you built. Hawker chose to stick with the known & available methods while the Spitfire was new cutting edge technology. Hurricane was the last of a long line. The right decision at the time.

Cheers John.

Colin Leighfield27/09/2016 13:33:51
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5965 forum posts
2494 photos

Hi John. I'm surprised at those numbers. Once Lord Nuffield was involved and car type mass production methods introduced at the new plant in Castle Bronwich, building a Spitfire became a process really of riveting together pre-formed aluminium pressed sections. I understand that until not many years ago a big press tool was still hanging on a wall in the (now Jaguar factory), that knocked out the "D-box" leading edge pressing in pretty much one piece.

Be that as it may! That's a fantastic model you are building and I'd be proud to call it mine.

Bucksboy27/09/2016 17:06:28
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559 forum posts
106 photos

That fuselage looks very similar to my Brian Taylor Bf 109, he came up with a winning design and stuck with it as the basis for all his models. Well, the ones of his I've built anyway. The Hurricane looks great, I was donated a half built version thats waiting in the wings for another year.

Nigel Day27/09/2016 20:57:51
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1158 forum posts
213 photos

Looks lovely John.

Trevor Crook28/09/2016 07:54:37
874 forum posts
65 photos

Looks great John. Are you going to have a battery hatch, and if so where? I ask this because I vaguely remember Danny building in A123 cells and charging in situ, but I may be wrong. Using "conventional" lipos and being able the swap them at the field seems more practical, but you obviously need an accessible but discreet battery hatch.

Danny Fenton29/09/2016 17:54:51
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9289 forum posts
4116 photos
I dont know getting the blame for being a bad influence
I did indeed my Hurricane around 6S2P A123 cells and can charge in situ. But the top of my cowl detaches to access all the electrics and sound module.
Looking Good John
John Timmis30/09/2016 12:48:53
222 forum posts
266 photos

image.jpeg

Hi Trevor, Danny.

This is an area of the model that I'm working on now. On the Hurricane, the whole of the fuselage forward of the cockpit was covered by removable metal panels, very convienient for us modellers.

The top of the cowling will be removable, the area bounded by the tape. There is enough room to hold a party in there. There is also the possibility to create a similar space under the cowling, perhaps for a sound module?

Cheers John.

image.jpeg

Geoff Sleath30/09/2016 13:08:42
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3492 forum posts
319 photos

That looks very neat, John. It looks like battery space isn't much of an issue. My DB Tiger Moth has a hinged hatch on the fibre glass cowl for battery access which is OK but isn't very scale looking. I'm sure you'll devise a much better solution. What motor are you using?

Geoff

Danny Fenton30/09/2016 13:18:52
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9289 forum posts
4116 photos

Hi John looking good, I put the sound system under the cowl, the BEC down one side, the ESC and telem the other. Air servo and filler at the top. The air cylinders (two) were where the fus fuel tank would be on the full size. I found it extremely crowded. However if you are not using air retracts, you will win back a shed load of space by not having the tanks.

The entire build of mine was over on RCSB

Cheers

Danny

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