By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by CML

Hacker Vagabond 1.5m Aerobat

Close to Slope Multi Aerobatic Glider

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Peter Garsden02/01/2017 19:23:42
avatar
1573 forum posts
1159 photos

20170102_073244.jpg

I wanted more light wind slope soarers as last year we seemed to have less strong winds - don't know if that is true. Also I decided to choose a plane for Christmas that was affordable.

It was a toss up between a Libelle and the Hacker. I appreciate that for no wind the Libelle is better but it has less of a wind range, so I chose this.

At the time there was no stock at T9 so my wife ordered it from Hacker EU. I wanted the foil covered version. I didn't realise that just meant cling film! It is also only applied to the wings. I went for the red model.

It is a multi aerobatic close to the slope model for reasonably light winds. What I don't know if how light a wind it will work in? I reckon that the limit will be about 6mph - does anyone know?

I bought the recommended 1600mah battery but not the Genning recommended servos because I remember meeting Andy Ellison up the Orme. His son had just written off the gears on the servos he was using. The cost of the Genning is £7.50 and you get what you pay for so I have gone for Savox of the same size and weight but the cost is £16.00 per servo or thereabouts, so we will see.

Peter Garsden02/01/2017 19:29:17
avatar
1573 forum posts
1159 photos

In typical German style the instructions are excellent. I have just received an Aeroic Stormbird, which comes with no instructions at all, not even the C of G. And you pay about 5 times the price - this is traditional for mouldies which is beyond my comprehension.

There is a bag of very interesting bits. The construction and methods are really clever, but this is a lighweight fairly delicate model, which is put together with thin cyano and foam to foam or UHU Por Glue.

I decided to transfer to bits to a sealable bag to make sure I lose nothing.

20170102_081953.jpg

Peter Garsden02/01/2017 19:31:40
avatar
1573 forum posts
1159 photos

The first job is to reinforce the strength of the fuselage with carbon rods. Accurate mm measurements tell you where the 3mm cuts start and finish. The carbon rods are 3mm

20170102_081925.jpg

20170102_081937.jpg

Peter Garsden02/01/2017 19:41:46
avatar
1573 forum posts
1159 photos

The second job is to make 6mm cuts to house the control rods tubes, so how to show where on the side of the fuselage they should go? The answer is a cardboard template. One side has the elevator channel and the other the rudder. The instructions say not to glue them at this stage so as to adjust their positions when everything is together.

20170102_083318.jpg

Peter Garsden02/01/2017 19:49:46
avatar
1573 forum posts
1159 photos

I couldn't see the top plywood former which holds the battery and servos until I realised it was inside the large canopy. Obviously it uses a smaller battery. T9 recommends a 1600mah four in line battery, which will fit the space. I attached it all the way along though the instructions say front first then back, so if this is a problem we will see later on.

20170102_090911.jpg

Phil Green02/01/2017 21:04:42
avatar
1517 forum posts
308 photos

I've just bought a Vagabond too, but not had chance to try it yet. Bought it from a clubmate who'd done a great assembly job but just didnt get along with it - still as new. I wanted a light-to-thermal-ish sloper that wasnt just a stooge to fly and the Vagabond sounded ideal, plus I like the idea of VTPR as a new challenge.

As you'll probably beat me to it I'm very much looking forward to your flight report!

Cheers
Phil

Bill_B02/01/2017 21:09:21
avatar
1145 forum posts
11 photos

Hi Peter, I've recently put one of these together so if you've any queries regarding the build I'll be happy to assist. thumbs up

BTW, Hacker Model Production, who make the Vagabond hail from the Czech Republik and aren't to be confused with Hacker Motor GmbH (Germany) who manufacture brushless motors. wink

Dave Wilshere02/01/2017 21:46:29
56 forum posts

I've had one in the same scheme as yours for over a year. Some of my friends who got them at the same time did not get on with it...but I think it is misunderstood! Its not really a fly around slope soarer, you will be probably be disappointed if that's your thing. The short small wire joiner should give the clue, its not designed for high G turns, I call it a static aerobatic model, sit in front of you on the slope edge and perform rolls with no forward speed, flips in its own length. I've not tried it in less that 10-12mph winds, wouldn't think its a 'scratcher' As always the slope type and lift will be the decider.

Ensure your choice of elevator servo centres and that the pushrod is not sticky!

Peter Garsden02/01/2017 22:04:54
avatar
1573 forum posts
1159 photos

Hacker - yes of course not Germany - still good instructions.

Oh dear, hope it will fulfil what I want of it. We will have to see.

Thanks for the tips chaps. Come to think of it, I haven't seen the Hackers people bought at our club since.

Peter Garsden02/01/2017 22:04:55
avatar
1573 forum posts
1159 photos

Hacker - yes of course not Germany - still good instructions.

Oh dear, hope it will fulfil what I want of it. We will have to see.

Thanks for the tips chaps. Come to think of it, I haven't seen the Hackers people bought at our club since.

Peter Garsden06/01/2017 08:11:12
avatar
1573 forum posts
1159 photos

Could some nice moderator delete the mysterious duplicate posting here?

Bill_B06/01/2017 09:07:53
avatar
1145 forum posts
11 photos

How's the build going?

Dave Bran06/01/2017 11:11:10
avatar
1898 forum posts
5 photos

Had one since they were first released, have to say not that impressed. Lacking in penetration built as per instructions compared to my other fleet. Not that light wind worthy either. Better on the slope in a steady 10-12 with some ballast added, but not great above that as its flexibility starts to destroy its accuracy.

Have a Libelle, not much better impressed by that either.

Le Fish runs rings round the Vagabond and the original Alula (not the moulded ruined slope only one) is significantly better than the Libelle, which needs more lift/breeze than any other DL glider I own, and has a very vulnerable fin despite super careful handling.

Back to the Vagabond, I allowed purchase with the Gening servo package having been advised that the model chosen was far better than sold to me with the Libelle (which were terrible and replaced with Dymond 4.7s after two flights), worst decision possible, they were total rubbish, not even flight worthy, awful centering, awful resolution, and weak. Swapped to Savox, which have been excellent. I would not use Genings on model railway layout scenery let alone flight!

Piers Bowlan06/01/2017 11:28:53
avatar
1871 forum posts
45 photos

I quite like my Libelle as a light wind soarer. Relaxing to fly and will stay up in the lightest lift. Penetrates reasonably well considering it is so light but 12 knots is the max I have flown it in. Not great inverted but a good model to take to the slope for when the wind dies. Stronger than it looks.

I considered getting a Vagabond, quite glad I didn't!

Andy Meade06/01/2017 11:41:29
avatar
2610 forum posts
679 photos

Quite fancy a Vagabond at some point too. Keep it up Sir Garsden yes

Dave Bran06/01/2017 12:28:05
avatar
1898 forum posts
5 photos
Posted by Dave Wilshere on 02/01/2017 21:46:29:

I've had one in the same scheme as yours for over a year. Some of my friends who got them at the same time did not get on with it...but I think it is misunderstood! Its not really a fly around slope soarer, you will be probably be disappointed if that's your thing. The short small wire joiner should give the clue, its not designed for high G turns, I call it a static aerobatic model, sit in front of you on the slope edge and perform rolls with no forward speed, flips in its own length. I've not tried it in less that 10-12mph winds, wouldn't think its a 'scratcher' As always the slope type and lift will be the decider.

Ensure your choice of elevator servo centres and that the pushrod is not sticky!

I wrote my previous post and then read the above!

SO,

Re: "Its not really a fly around slope soarer".... yes very true, it does not want to fly forward at all, and if I wanted a Helicopter I'd have bought (another) one. It's definitely NOT a "scratcher" and it needs plenty of lift, then performs adequately if not inspiringly. Re: "short small wire joiner", maybe, but its not that small and its got full length rectangular wooden spars of a quite large section, so it should not be floppy or unable to take some wind.

As to Genings:- **LINK**

I rest my case.

Fitted Savox, NO issues at all, centering fine, no glitches, fine resolution, and that with NO other changes.

Dave Bran06/01/2017 12:32:28
avatar
1898 forum posts
5 photos

PS............ Only lack of modelling time has prevented me fitting a motor on the front!

KiwiKid06/01/2017 12:52:12
avatar
473 forum posts
468 photos

Well I did find some modelling time and grafted a motor on the front. Posted a vid and noticed not long after that Hacker came out with a motorised version of the Vag - LOL. They now have quite a variety of scale models built with the same tech as the Vag that can be flown as gliders or powered. I went with the powered option for the reasons already mentioned and to get more stick time. Here's a short vid of the maiden flights - just tooling around getting a feel for her. I have since got a bit more adventurous and really enjoy flying this model. Great party trick is a powered flat spin.

https://vimeo.com/129950695

 

Edited By KiwiKid on 06/01/2017 12:54:42

Peter Garsden07/01/2017 23:22:38
avatar
1573 forum posts
1159 photos

I have to say that after reading all these I am really looking forward to flying this. Ironically I was torn between getting one of these and a Libelle. Only time will tell whether I made the wrong choice. I am not surprised it doesn't penetrate but am surprised it needs 10mph winds. Mind you the instructions say it needs 5metres per second which is 11mph.

Anyway back to the build....I am amazed how easy and quick this is. Real doddle and everything is supplied - unlike my Stormbird which is next which has no instructions at all and some parts you have to supply yourself and it it is 5 times the price

Glad I have gone for the Savox servos - seems the right choice. The Gennings only cost £7.50 each so if you pay diddly squat then that is what you will get.

20170107_131401.jpg

In this picture you can see the all moving tailplane and the middle bit around which it rotates. It is quite flimsy. I used thin cyano to glue the moving part and it wicked into the bit which were meant to stay dry despite me using vaseline. I had to free it then scrape the glue off and paste it with vaseline again.

You can also see the rudder horn fixing which is a piece of wire held to the carbon rod with shrink tubing and cyano. Very tight and effective, but lightweight. The wire is held in place with a tiny plastic glued washer..

Peter Garsden07/01/2017 23:25:16
avatar
1573 forum posts
1159 photos

The rudder is only butt glued onto the fuselage and is not very substantial. I see above that it is vulnerable. I am not surprised.

20170107_131414.jpg

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of RCM&E? Use our magazine locator link to find your nearest stockist!

Find RCM&E! 

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
CML
Pepe Aircraft
electricwingman 2017
Cambridge Gliding Club
Gliders Distribution
Slec
Wings & Wheels 2019
Advertise With Us
Sarik
Latest "For Sale" Ads
New Poll - Sticky situations...
Q: How often - when using superglue - do you end up with it on your fingers?

 Every time
 Occasionally
 Sometimes
 Rarely
 Never
 Wear rubber gloves

Latest Reviews
Digital Back Issues

RCM&E Digital Back Issues

Contact us

Contact us