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1/5th scale Supermarine S6b

comments on design and construction

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John Stainforth05/01/2017 17:32:03
376 forum posts
64 photos

I have just got back to this having had to leave it for nearly a year. I did the 3D design in Rhino about two years ago built the framework (with laser cut parts, cut by Belair) in late 2015. Recently, I sheeted the floats and the cowling, which was an interesting exercise in sheeting with strong double curvature. Here is the sheeted cowling, which weighs 1.6 oz:

s6b_model_builtupcowling1pt6oz.jpg

The next picture shows the complete airframe as it is this evening (5th Jan 2017), with the 3D-printed cylinder head fairings held roughly in place with an elastic band>

s6b_model_5jan2017.jpg

Incidentally, I am also starting to populate and album on this site with these and other photos.

Martian05/01/2017 17:47:21
2612 forum posts
1237 photos

That looks a cracker and one to follow

Tony Bennett05/01/2017 17:49:59
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5082 forum posts
129 photos

love it.

DCW05/01/2017 17:59:14
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100 forum posts
66 photos

Excellent.. Nice to see a model of such an iconic aircraft.

David

Alan Gorham_05/01/2017 18:01:30
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1339 forum posts
146 photos

John, fantastic model, will enjoy seeing any progress with it.

Are you any relation to Wing Commander G H Stainforth who certainly had a close association with the S6b?

John Stainforth05/01/2017 18:54:03
376 forum posts
64 photos

Many thanks all for the encouraging comments. I may well be seeking advice during the finishing of the model. This is the first model I have built from scratch since 1965, my first effort at 3D drafting and my first efforts at 3D printing, so I have been on quite a steep (but enjoyable) learning curve.

Yes, George Stainforth is my great uncle: he was the first man to travel faster than 400 mph - in the S6b.

Alan Gorham_05/01/2017 18:59:29
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1339 forum posts
146 photos

John

I'm a very keen model floatplane flyer and a great fan of all things Schneider. I did already know that your great uncle was the first man to exceed 400mph while flying the S6b - what a fantastic family connection to the superb model you are building.

Thanks so much for starting this thread!

Colin Leighfield05/01/2017 21:11:37
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6007 forum posts
2505 photos

The S6B was a wonderful aeroplane and it's performance all of those last years ago still seems hard to believe. Born in the mind of a genius who could turn dreams that seemed impossible into reality. That's a fantastic model, congratulations, I couldn't be more interested.

John Stainforth05/01/2017 21:42:56
376 forum posts
64 photos

Again, thanks all for the great response. Although I have this family connection with this aeroplane, even without that I would regard it as one of the most important in the history of aviation. It represented the pinnacle of Schneider Trophy achievement that bridged the gap between the biplane era of the Great War and the monoplane era of the Second World War. Although the Spitfire was not a direct derivative of the S6b, the genius Mitchell and the brilliant team he built around him put all the expertise they gained in the Schneider years into the Spitfire. Which (just) allowed us to prevail in the Battle of Britain. Without the Spitfire and it's Schneider forerunners, how would the Second World War have gone? BTW, I don't think I am overstating this case.

onetenor05/01/2017 21:52:25
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1901 forum posts
Posted by John Stainforth on 05/01/2017 17:32:03:

I have just got back to this having had to leave it for nearly a year. I did the 3D design in Rhino about two years ago built the framework (with laser cut parts, cut by Belair) in late 2015. Recently, I sheeted the floats and the cowling, which was an interesting exercise in sheeting with strong double curvature. Here is the sheeted cowling, which weighs 1.6 oz:

s6b_model_builtupcowling1pt6oz.jpg

The next picture shows the complete airframe as it is this evening (5th Jan 2017), with the 3D-printed cylinder head fairings held roughly in place with an elastic band>

s6b_model_5jan2017.jpg

Incidentally, I am also starting to populate and album on this site with these and other photos.

Superb model of a superb aircraft Well done young sir Will follow with great interest. Really lovely job John

Colin Leighfield05/01/2017 21:54:40
avatar
6007 forum posts
2505 photos

You certainly aren't John. Mitchell's early death was a great tragedy. He was head and shoulders above the other British designers and would have achieved even greater things if only he had been given the chance. We can only dream.

John Stainforth05/01/2017 22:05:14
376 forum posts
64 photos

Again, thanks all for the great response. Although I have this family connection with this aeroplane, even without that I would regard it as one of the most important in the history of aviation. It represented the pinnacle of Schneider Trophy achievement that bridged the gap between the biplane era of the Great War and the monoplane era of the Second World War. Although the Spitfire was not a direct derivative of the S6b, the genius Mitchell and the brilliant team he built around him put all the expertise they gained in the Schneider years into the Spitfire. Which (just) allowed us to prevail in the Battle of Britain. Without the Spitfire and it's Schneider forerunners, how would the Second World War have gone? BTW, I don't think I am overstating this case.

reg shaw05/01/2017 23:25:45
avatar
640 forum posts
562 photos

Great to see some pictures on here John, it's a fabulous piece of work. I see you've left it a year or so, a bit like me, I've had lots of things going on this last year too! I still am very interested in the bigger version and look forward to your progress. Are you bringing the beast to the next indoor do at Hulland Ward?

Cheers, Ian.

Graeme Poke05/01/2017 23:32:31
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180 forum posts
20 photos

What a fantastic model John. You have built a superb Aeroplane.

Being a Spitfire tragic, I visited the Solent Sky Museum at Southhampton in July. I really enjoyed seeing the real aircraft. It's a fascinating story. They had a couple of models as well.

I have often thought of building an RC model so I will be following your build with great interest. Incidentally, I went to some trouble to visit as we live in Tasmania. All the best Graeme

John Stainforth06/01/2017 14:08:49
376 forum posts
64 photos

Ian,

I have sent you a msg saying that I would love to collaborate with a double sized version of this model. I think it is a great idea, because it would require very little modification of the 3D computer model.

But first let's see how well this flies before embarking on a larger one! I am hoping it will be ready for flight in the early summer.

John

John Stainforth27/01/2017 00:00:19
376 forum posts
64 photos

Today, I worked on the aileron hinges etc. This took more work than I expected to get the Robart pinned hinges into their correct positions. The Robart pinned hinges broaden out from circular to square cross sections close to the hinge-line, and a surprising amount of filing of the holes in the aileron LE's and wing TE's was required to fit these broad shoulders into the holes. In any future scale model I will be strongly tempted to use removable wires along the hinge-lines and glass-epoxy board hinges, as recommended by Dave Platt in his videos. (BTW, every time I have done things differently to Dave Platt, I have regretted it!) Have other modellers experienced similar hassles with pinned hinges?s6b-aileronhinges.jpg

Martin McIntosh27/01/2017 08:51:07
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3576 forum posts
1231 photos

Really good to see one of these again. Back in the70`s the JDM display team had six of them, glass fuselages and nylon covered wings, so fairly weighty for a 60 motor. They flew a treat and even did point rolls better than many aerobatic models. Mine died trying to fly too low over water for the TV cameras.

Landings needed to be very gentle to avoid bouncing.

Martyn K27/01/2017 09:16:22
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5102 forum posts
3701 photos

Superb build - watching how this develops

Delta Foxtrot27/01/2017 09:33:47
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566 forum posts
91 photos
Posted by John Stainforth on 05/01/2017 21:42:56:

Again, thanks all for the great response. Although I have this family connection with this aeroplane, even without that I would regard it as one of the most important in the history of aviation. It represented the pinnacle of Schneider Trophy achievement that bridged the gap between the biplane era of the Great War and the monoplane era of the Second World War. Although the Spitfire was not a direct derivative of the S6b, the genius Mitchell and the brilliant team he built around him put all the expertise they gained in the Schneider years into the Spitfire. Which (just) allowed us to prevail in the Battle of Britain. Without the Spitfire and it's Schneider forerunners, how would the Second World War have gone? BTW, I don't think I am overstating this case.

Looks marvellous John, I will certainly follow your build with great interest. I have just started Ralph Pegram's book on the ST so it is quite topical for me.

Of course this is a wonderful, historic aircraft which was instrumental to the developments that you mention however, we must not forget that what was going on under the bonnet was equally important and instrumental in our salvation in WW2.

keep up the good work.

Colin Leighfield27/01/2017 17:08:36
avatar
6007 forum posts
2505 photos

DF is bang on about the engine of course. I understand that the "R" engine was the true predecessor of the Griffon, also 37 litres. Stunning engineering and aerodynamics, hard to believe even now a seaplane doing 400 mph not far off 90 years ago.

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