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Anet A8

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Geoff Gardiner01/06/2017 23:10:00
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424 forum posts
733 photos

Hi MaL

As part of the upgrade I changed the startup G Code so that it does a 9 point level reading across the bed before each print. All I can say is that it makes a better job of (effectively) leveling the bed than I do.

MaL02/06/2017 12:36:38
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140 forum posts
13 photos

Trying to understand exactly what the probe is doing..

Is it making a map of 9 sample bed heights during a probe and amending Z=0 as it is printing (so the head moves up and down during each layer as well as the head moving up at the end of each layer, as per a delta machine

or

the probe just decides the average head height (allowing for x,y and z offsets) from taking 9 readings from different places on the bed during the probe and calls that Z=0

I guess it is most probably the latter. If so the probe is not helping you at all in levelling the bed, just in setting the first layer height. This is a task I usually do on the fly, if it is needed, while it is laying down a perimeter skirt to get an even 'squish' before it starts the actual print.

MaL02/06/2017 16:57:32
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140 forum posts
13 photos

For getting the bed levelled I suggest you go get one of these - **LINK** and print yourself a holder that attaches to your x carriage. You can adjust any discrepancy in the X carriage to bed parallelism by moving the Z axis leadscrews against each other. Adjusting the Y axis will require some form of adjustment screw... I assume the A8 has one. It really is quite simple to get the bed level once you can see the dial gauge indicating which way it is sloping. Once the bed is as level as it can be (neither glass nor machine plate is perfectly flat) your probe can set the print height.

parridav04/06/2017 15:25:02
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13 forum posts
1 photos

Just put my A8 together and running a test print. now I have to decide what upgrades are needed and what to print first.

Robin Etherton04/06/2017 17:12:44
271 forum posts
41 photos

Parridav

You may consider;

Glass bed

Front and rear frame brace.

Y belt tensioner

Mosfet for heating bed

Probably in that order of priority.

Robin

Geoff Gardiner04/06/2017 17:46:07
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424 forum posts
733 photos

I have been working on a radial engine for my Puppeteer:

dsc00430.jpg

I haven't tried fitting it yet, so may need some more work doing to it.

Simon Chaddock04/06/2017 19:42:38
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5485 forum posts
2883 photos

This is my solution to the problem of keeping the Z belt tension a 'strut' that directly connects the Z stepper motor to the belt return pulley. (A view of the underside)

Zstrut1

It is in 3 parts.

A substantial rear box strut fixed to the Z stepper motor.

Zstrut2

And twin front struts that also carry the belt return pulley.

Zstrut3

The front and rear struts are not fixed together but are exactly the right length and press directly on the Perspex center cross member. In this way the distance between the stepper motor and the return pulley is held fixed regardless of the belt tension. The main printer frame carries none of the belt loads. Apart from 3 longer screws for the Z stepper motor it requires no modification to the A8.

The only draw back is it is hard to alter the belt tension but with a completely rigid support structure once set it should hopefully not need any further adjustment for a substantial period. wink 2

Tony Bennett04/06/2017 20:02:58
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5080 forum posts
129 photos

here is the 1/4 scale seven cylinder radial i printed out for my biplane.

Tony B

Simon Chaddock05/06/2017 13:15:18
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5485 forum posts
2883 photos

Nothing to do with planes but having built a working single cylinder "air" engine I thought I would try to go one better and design a twin.

Similar in concept and with the same valve gear as before but with bigger diameter cylinders.

Twin complte

"Built up" from over 40 separate pieces everything is either hollow or kept as thin as possible. You can even see the shadow of the pistons through the cylinders.

Twin pistons

The crankshaft is glued together from 7 components and to reduce friction runs in just two bearings.

Lead weighs are added to the crank webs to statically balance the weight of the pistons and connecting rods.

Twin crank weights

With twin double acting cylinders it is self starting but with the fit of the pistons and valve gear set for for "free running" it needs a lot of air! wink 2

Edited By Simon Chaddock on 05/06/2017 13:16:25

parridav05/06/2017 14:14:04
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13 forum posts
1 photos

Robin, Thanks for that, I think I'm going to start with the Mosfet and soldering the connections to the bed together with the Velleman print bed surface. I think it needs a proper on/off switch so I'll print a case for the power supply that includes it and a new fan duct.

Robin Etherton05/06/2017 21:35:22
271 forum posts
41 photos

Parridav

I am also in the process of upgrading the wires to the heat bed and direct soldering them.

And have ordered a mains plug and switch. What a pain in the preverbial to have to pull out the plug each time.

Swmbo has also prompted me to order a quieter extruder fan. Sometimes the supplied one screams at high pitch and even if you turn it down on the panel the pesky gcode sometimes turns it back up again.

Sometime soon I hope to finish the upgrades and get down to printing something useful, but it's great fun getting there.

Simon Chaddock05/06/2017 23:37:28
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5485 forum posts
2883 photos

Robin E

If you are referring to te centrifugal extruder fan its speed can be controlled (or switched off completely) by setting parameters in the slicer program.

As far as I know the axial extruder fan is on all the time the extruder nozzle heat is on..

Robin Etherton06/06/2017 07:54:19
271 forum posts
41 photos

Simon

Thanks for that.

The axial fan is no problem.

Didn't know that about the slicer program. I will do some exploring whilst waiting for the new fan. Only been printing a few days and it's a whole new world of jargon and mysteries.

Robin

MaL06/06/2017 10:34:41
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140 forum posts
13 photos

The extruder cooling fan must remain on, blowing air over the extruder heatsink while the hotend is hot. Most , if not all, controller boards automatically switch it on and off according to the thermistor temperature. Failure to keep  the 'cold end' cool will cause the filament to melt too high up in the nozzle and cause a jam - usually referred to as heat creep.

The filament cooling fan is controllable via the software and is usually switched on after the first layer has been deposited to assist maintaining the print integrity when printing overhangs and bridges, it 'sets' the plastic before it can droop. It is only needed if you have overhangs.

Edited By MaL on 06/06/2017 10:36:39

Martin Harris06/06/2017 12:30:11
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8955 forum posts
221 photos

I've printed one of these and it seems to have solved the screaming fan!

David Bowdler13/06/2017 00:04:39
6 forum posts
2 photos

Hi all, I am a newbie to this forum and 3D printing. Here is a picture of a Gnome engine printed for my electric Flair Puppeteer. A Friend designed it in CAD for me and we both printed the parts. The crank Case, Cylinder, Cylinder Head and Fuel inlet tubes are separately printed, primed with Halfords Plastic bumper primer. Then finished with Humbrol Enamels. If anyone is interested I could upload the files to Thingyverse. Davewp_20170601_003.jpg

Martin Harris13/06/2017 14:42:39
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8955 forum posts
221 photos

Please do! My Legionnaire wears a collection of Williams crankcase and cylinders assembled at (not quite as much as RRP) great cost sourced from Ebay etc. but that looks very convincing.

Ken Lighten13/06/2017 17:05:30
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249 forum posts
42 photos

If you only knew how long I've been trying to do that!, YES, please do make it available, you'd be making a middle aged man very happy!

Geoff Gardiner13/06/2017 17:18:40
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424 forum posts
733 photos

That would be great David - much better than my effort.

There is a group here for uploading RC flying stuff on thingiverse.

Geoff...

Simon Chaddock13/06/2017 18:04:12
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5485 forum posts
2883 photos

David

That is a spectacular model.

Building up such an engine from individual printed parts seems to be the best option.

Now if i was to be very picky I could point out that the rocker configuration is not quite right.

The 80 hp Le Rhone had an unusual rocker arrangement which meant the push rod was not parallel to the cylinder but was angled a bit towards the inlet duct.

This is the usual scale 'conundrum' - the more you put on the more it shows up! wink 2

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