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My Ultimate Biplane Build

The World Models 27% Ultimate 50cc Biplane Build Blog

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john stones 104/10/2017 20:40:52
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10424 forum posts
1475 photos

Like the black/white colour scheme. yes

Gary Manuel04/10/2017 21:27:06
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1854 forum posts
1507 photos

Bottom one looks the business.

Ultymate04/10/2017 22:19:29
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1690 forum posts
57 photos

This is the full size it's modelled on

ownerw10.jpg

john stones 104/10/2017 22:30:19
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10424 forum posts
1475 photos

Made a good job then yes

Gary Manuel05/10/2017 22:34:57
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1854 forum posts
1507 photos

If there's one fault I can pick with AGM switches, it's that they don't include a cutting template.

Here's one I prepared earlier. Masking tape applied underneath and to hold the template in place.

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Template outline transferred to the fuselage.

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Hole cut out for the switch.

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Tank prepared using 2 pipe method. I used an old tank from the same model that the engine came from, for no reason other than I know it works. All pipework was renewed. The supplied one is a similar size and looks OK to use.

The tank is sat on supplied foam and tie wrapped onto the slide in ply shelf. Note the tab on the front of the shelf and the two holes at the rear.

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Oops - tie wraps cut in order to manipulate the shelf and tank into position. They won't go in pre-assembled.

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New tie-wraps fitted, which now allows the assembly ......

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...... to be slid into place and secured with the two 3mm machine screws.

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Care needs to be taken that the tab on the front of the shelf engages properly into the slot in the former.

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Switch fitted - note the integral fuel dot .....

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..... which tucks nicely out of the way.

The switch nearest the front is for the ignition. The other is for the receiver.

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Kill switch fitted up front, next to the throttle servo.

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LED for the kill switch fitted next to the ignition switch.

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Holes in the front of the fuselage blocked using bits of scrap balsa.

I'll fuel proof this area later (same time as I repair the cowl).

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Balance lead for the ignition LiFePO4 battery left dangling near the air exit hole. I'll secure it and possibly extend it later if needed.

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Edited By Gary Manuel on 05/10/2017 22:37:26

onetenor05/10/2017 22:51:17
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1900 forum posts

What's the last pic?

john stones 105/10/2017 22:53:19
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10424 forum posts
1475 photos

Very nice n tidy Gary, why no spiral wrap on the battery leads going through the bulkhead ?

Gary Manuel05/10/2017 23:55:48
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1854 forum posts
1507 photos
Posted by onetenor on 05/10/2017 22:51:17:

What's the last pic?

Just showing the balsa sheeting over the remaining holes for completeness. It should actually include the spiral wrapped supply to the ignition passing from the fuselage, but I didn't frame the photo very well. You can see it on the photo with the kill switch before I sheeted over the holes.

Posted by john stones 1 on 05/10/2017 22:53:19:

Very nice n tidy Gary, why no spiral wrap on the battery leads going through the bulkhead ?

They are hot glued as they enter the fuselage, plus they are proper multi-strand flexible cable with silicone insulation - they don't need it.

Edited By Gary Manuel on 06/10/2017 00:02:19

Adrian Smith 106/10/2017 08:43:30
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2151 forum posts
835 photos

Took a lot of patience getting fuel tank sorted and fitted I guess. Looks a neat job all done. I must admit I also tend to hot glue wires that pass through the bulkhead - seems to work fine.

Rich too06/10/2017 11:08:41
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2902 forum posts
1046 photos

I am not a fan of the two line tank, as I do not like to have joints in the carb line.

What is to stop the tank sliding backwards/forwards? I tend to use triangle stock at the front and rear of the tank.

Nice switch ! yes

Edited By Rich too on 06/10/2017 11:09:07

Gary Manuel06/10/2017 11:21:59
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1854 forum posts
1507 photos
Posted by Adrian Smith 1 on 06/10/2017 08:43:30:

Took a lot of patience getting fuel tank sorted and fitted I guess. Looks a neat job all done. I must admit I also tend to hot glue wires that pass through the bulkhead - seems to work fine.

It did take patience. Good job I didn't follow the sequence shown in the manual. That shows diagonal bracing across the canopy area BEFORE the tank is fitted!  (AB = Epoxy)

This just shows how important it is to read and understand the instructions and to PLAN AHEAD.

06-10-2017 11-11-05.jpg

Posted by Rich too on 06/10/2017 11:08:41:

I am not a fan of the two line tank, as I do not like to have joints in the carb line.

What is to stop the tank sliding backwards/forwards? I tend to use triangle stock at the front and rear of the tank.

Nice switch ! yes

Edited By Rich too on 06/10/2017 11:09:07

I hear what you say about the joints in the fuel line. I too was concerned when I first tried this system. I've had three models like this now and never had any trouble, so I'm getting to like it now.

Only friction (the foam is quite grippy) plus a bit of glue between the tie-wraps and the top of the tank is stopping the tank moving at the moment. You've got me thinking though. I'll have another look at that,

Edited By Gary Manuel on 06/10/2017 11:24:35

Rich too06/10/2017 11:54:08
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2902 forum posts
1046 photos

The tank is probably fine Gary, but I'm belt and braces! Although a full tank must become very heavy under positive and negative G's!

Gary Manuel06/10/2017 12:04:39
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1854 forum posts
1507 photos
Posted by Rich too on 06/10/2017 11:54:08:

The tank is probably fine Gary, but I'm belt and braces! Although a full tank must become very heavy under positive and negative G's!

Yes that's what's going through my mind. Mine will get plenty of G's - in all directions.

Ultymate06/10/2017 12:39:13
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1690 forum posts
57 photos

I must admit I'm strictly a three line tank man, I like minimum connections between clunk and carburetor, there's very strong suction on Walbro style carbs and the slightest leak on a joint will have a stream of air bubbles headed towards your engine

Adrian Smith 106/10/2017 12:55:48
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2151 forum posts
835 photos

Rich's suggestion of triangular stock to hold the tank is also something I do purely because in the past I thought the tank was secure, but after a few aeros it wasn't! wink

john stones 106/10/2017 19:30:38
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10424 forum posts
1475 photos

3 lines for me, no doodahs fitted KISS.

Gary Manuel09/10/2017 17:12:09
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1854 forum posts
1507 photos

I've been after an incident meter for a while but couldn't justify the £50 odd it would cost for the number of times it would get used. The Ultimate gives me an excuse to do something about it, as I need to start somewhere with the incident angle adjustment of the tail end relative to the main wings. I asked a club member to do a bit of 3D printing for me and he came up with the goods this weekend.

These are what he printed for me.

dscn5819.jpg

They are a straight printout of the STL files found within THIS page - which I found whilst looking round for an incident meter.

The square holes are to fit 7.5mm square aluminium tube, which I couldn't find in the small quantity I needed. I picked up a length of 8mm square solid aluminium from B&Q. With a bit of filing, they are all now tight sliding fit onto the square bar. The thumb screws were screwed straight in and are a nice tight fit.

dscn5820.jpg

I found some nice long 3mm bolts with long unthreaded shanks which will make an ideal hinge pin. The "V-block" needs to swivel on the hinge pin to allow for tapered wings.

dscn5821.jpg

The parts were then glued together like this:

dscn5822.jpg

The parts were then slid onto the square bar to complete the job.

dscn5823.jpg

My Android phone armed with the "clinometer" software shown on the link above was then sat on the incidence meter.

The meter was calibrated with the model sat on my stand which is far from level. There is no need to mess around with levelling - the meter can be calibrated at any angle, allowing relative measurements to easily be taken.

dscn5824.jpg

Meter then moved to the tail. Picture went a bit dark after a while due to phone settings .....

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.... but touching the screen brightens it up again. Angle is out by 1 degree.

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Angle adjusted using the embedded grub screws. I had a bit of trouble with one of them but that's another story I'll talk about in another post.

dscn5828.jpg

Thats' getting pretty close now.

I'll give it a final adjustment once the grub screw business is sorted.

I'll also do the other side and check the bottom main wing

dscn5829.jpg

Edit - I've just noticed that the relative measurements in the photos are in % of 45 degrees.

It can easily be changed to degrees within the settings - which I've done now.

Edited By Gary Manuel on 09/10/2017 17:45:04

DaveyP09/10/2017 19:17:49
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206 forum posts
47 photos

Brilliant work I'm learning a lot, also just downloaded Clinometer, that is an excellent app. thumbs up.

Rich too10/10/2017 05:40:50
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2902 forum posts
1046 photos

That’s very clever, and thanks for the tip on the app yes

Gary Manuel11/10/2017 15:26:41
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1854 forum posts
1507 photos

I said in my last post above that I would come back to a problem I had with one of the tail incidence adjusting grub screws. What happened was that as I was trying to adjust the incidence angle, one of the grub screws was turning but not actually adjusting the incidence angle or tightening up onto the incidence adjusting bar as it should do. The grub screw was obviously slipping within the embedded thread.

The grub screw looked OK and was about 2.5mm thread but I couldn't find a nut that was a proper fit. What I decided to do was to try to screw a 3mm bolt into the existing hole. This went in OK and adjusted the incidence angle OK, but didn't fill me with confidence that it would stay put.

I decided to cut a bit of balsa away and epoxy a 3mm nut above the existing thread, using a 3mm bolt smeared with Vaseline to align everything.

dscn5845.jpg

Once the epoxy was set, the 3mm bolt could be removed.

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This then allowed the incidence angle to be adjusted between the original grub screw on top of the tail stab and the new bolt on the bottom. The adjustment is actually quite easy to do - the hardest part is avoiding disturbing the model or the table it is sitting on.

dscn5848.jpg

Once I knew how far the bolt needed to be screwed in to give the proper adjustment, I marked the bolt with a silver paint pen.

dscn5849.jpg

I then removed the bolt ........

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..... cut the head off and cut a slot in the end suitable for a small screwdriver.

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That's better. I should be able to cover this (and the other grub screws) with suitable film once everything is adjusted.

dscn5852.jpg

While I was at it, I checked the bottom wing.

0.2 degrees - nothing to worry about there. I'll probably make things worse if I try to correct this.

dscn5846.jpg

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