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Phil 924/09/2017 12:27:08
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4287 forum posts
247 photos

my building workbench has so far consisted of an old dressing table and up until recently if was fine. But I have had to change over to varifocal glasses and suddenly its not so great.

I normally stand to work on my models but with the bench low down I now find it difficult to focus with my new specs. I can see my work better if I sit at the bench but then I loose the freedom of movement around the model. I thought a stand up height workbench might work better.

It is still early days with my varifocals so maybe I will find things easier as I use them more. But I would be interested in hearings the experience of others

Edited By Phil 9 on 24/09/2017 12:28:51

IanR24/09/2017 12:47:50
777 forum posts
4 photos

Whilst pealing and chopping, for SWMBO, I realised that, by leaning on the kitchen worktop, the spuds and wotnot were perfectly in focus via my reading glasses. When I cobbled a workshop together I put in a small area at desktop height which is good for sitting against when, say, soldering but my main building board area is at kitchen worktop height where I stand and lean. Either way I can focus perfectly on the job in hand.

I think that getting the working area in focus is the main thing.

Ian

Former Member24/09/2017 12:48:11

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Broken Prop24/09/2017 12:51:42
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618 forum posts
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Being a lazy savage I opted for a low building bench so that I can sit down. I then went to the local secondhand office suppliers and bought a swivelling office chair on wheels. I zip up and down the bench at will. smiley

It works very well for me, even with bifocal glasses.

Pete

Plummet24/09/2017 12:53:51
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1414 forum posts
41 photos

I have been wearing varifocals for ages, and not had any great trouble. Just remember that the close up bit of the lens is at the bottom, so make sure that your specs are not crawling down your nose. For close work I do sometimes just lift up my specs a bit off my nose to get a better look at something small.

HOWEVER ...

I do do a bit of close work, I make some of my own garments, and when you make a boo-boo you have to unpick seams. This is a bit much for my ageing eyesight and so I got my optician to make me a cheap pair of strong reading glasses. These are stronger than I need for reading, but are great for close fiddly work.  They are horrible to wear if you want, for instance, look out of the window!

Also remember that your eyes will always see detail better in a good light. IKEA do some very cheap LED lights on stalks that are good for illuminating your work.

Plummet

 

Edited By Plummet on 24/09/2017 12:56:43

Phil 924/09/2017 12:55:54
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4287 forum posts
247 photos
Posted by Ikura on 24/09/2017 12:48:11:

Hi Phil,

I tried varifocal glasses but couldn't get on with them and went back to normal out and about glasses and separate reading/model building glasses.

To be honest, varifocals made me feel dizzy and I never seemed to be able to get the viewing ange correct.

Probably not what you wanted to hear.

up until now I have only ever needed single vision glasses and I know as far as my vision is concerned things wont be as straightforward from now on what ever I use

Edited By Phil 9 on 24/09/2017 12:58:19

DavidKP24/09/2017 13:08:41
38 forum posts
23 photos

I have contact lenses for normal day wear, helps with the long distance vision and driving at night in particular.

Then in the office I have to wear glasses on top for using the computer but I also have another pair of glasses recommended by the optician for working on the models when you tend to have things closer to your eyes than the computer screen on your desk.

My workbench is a piece of wood on an old IKEA desk, some jobs are better done sitting down but some I like to stand at, so for that the plane comes up as well. Didnt want to spend all of that money on one those fancy adjustable plane stands, so I cut the appropriate shape into the top of two cardboard wine boxes and I find that having the plane up that height above the standard desk height is perfect for me. And I have a ready supply of replacement boxes for the next plane that I build

Phil 924/09/2017 13:17:12
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4287 forum posts
247 photos
Posted by Plummet on 24/09/2017 12:53:51:

I do do a bit of close work, I make some of my own garments, and when you make a boo-boo you have to unpick seams. This is a bit much for my ageing eyesight and so I got my optician to make me a cheap pair of strong reading glasses. These are stronger than I need for reading, but are great for close fiddly work. They are horrible to wear if you want, for instance, look out of the window!

Also remember that your eyes will always see detail better in a good light. IKEA do some very cheap LED lights on stalks that are good for illuminating your work.

Plummet

I moved into my current house one 3 years ago and I used to work in the garage with just a single light bulb. Impossible now. I have set up 3 small strip lights over my workbench that give me good lighting and are positioned to eliminate shadows. reading glasses alone would give me focus on the model but as soon as I turn to find a tool or some wood I will be unable to focus on anything.

Outrunner24/09/2017 13:17:20
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75 forum posts
22 photos

Phil. I switched to varifocal glasses a few few years ago, no looking back. Took a while to get used to but worth it. It was a real pain to switch glasses for reading or distance. I can watch my model flying and see my transmitter screen or when driving see the instruments when looking down.

Persevere with the varifocals it's worth it.

Phil.

G194024/09/2017 13:31:19
3523 forum posts
1 photos

We were supplied with safety glasses at work because we sometimes soldered on the bench. Since retiring I've replaced them a couple of times and wear them always in the workshop and for reading. They've got stronger as I've aged but even if they hadn't I wouldn't be without them just for the extra protection from possible flying debris ranging from bits of wood, broken scalpel blade or swarfe from my drill. Eyes are delicate and easily damaged!

I wear varifocals for driving and flying as well as for just going out. However the first set I had were very poor. My current pair from a different optician are very much better. I think they need to be properly ground to work well but are fine if they are. I was offered several grades and chose the best and most expensive. Even then, I wouldn't use them in the workshop and much prefer my single focus safety glasses often assisted by a head magnifier for very close work.

Geoff

Jon Laughton25/09/2017 09:25:40
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1192 forum posts
72 photos

I have worn varifocals for over ten years - never had any problems with them in the workshop or flying. Due to ageing rheumatic joints and knackered everything else I now tend to sit down at my 'normal height worktable' (a freebie second hand dining table) in the workshop on an old office swivel chair.

Of course sometimes I do have to stand up to work on models but eventually age tells me to sit down again have a drink and listen to Classic FM! Oh to be young and pain free once more.....(but won't be giving areomodelling up any time soon - hopefully)

Jon

Percy Verance25/09/2017 13:54:13
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8108 forum posts
155 photos

Varifocals here for 10+ years too. They do take getting used to, which will disappoint those whom expected instant results. Your eyes need to adjust, and it takes as long as it takes. Everyone will be different.

I do have some cheapie reading glasses in my building room though, along with another pair in the garden workshop.

Toni Reynaud25/09/2017 16:05:43
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420 forum posts
58 photos

Plus one for the separate pair of reading/close work specs for the workshop. The varifocals work fine for everything else, and a lot of the time modelling, but the single vision specs just go the last 10%.

David P Williams25/09/2017 17:01:08
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880 forum posts
292 photos

Don't need varifocals, but do need reading/close work specs. Have several pairs around the house and workshop including safety spec versions.

Would recommend a standing bench rather than sitting, although I have enough space for both. I use the standing one for most things, and the sitting one mostly just for soldering.

Best thing I did when building my standing bench was to set it at about elbow height - just over 1 metre for me - with power sockets at the front so no wires snaking across the bench. I also have an anti-fatigue floor mat like these which I find fantastic.

A couple of pics from when I first built it.......

workshop 005.jpg

workshop 004.jpg

Don Fry25/09/2017 19:49:33
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4557 forum posts
54 photos

God, and I gave up smoking because of the fire hazard of stamping a fag out in the workshop. You could build a tidy machine in the time it would take to upgrade my slum to that.

Don Fry25/09/2017 19:51:29
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4557 forum posts
54 photos

God, and I gave up smoking because of the fire hazard of stamping a fag out in the workshop. You could build a tidy machine in the time it would take to upgrade my slum to that.

Post Medoc double thumb tremble. Ignore. But a workshop that clean. I bow to a superior being.

Edited By Don Fry on 25/09/2017 19:54:43

David P Williams25/09/2017 20:10:13
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880 forum posts
292 photos

Don - it was only that clean cos I'd only just finished building it. It's definitely not like that now....

Chris Walby25/09/2017 20:13:40
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1117 forum posts
266 photos

varifocals for me as I need them for everyday use, but long horizontal lines are seriously distorted, and don't ever try running down stairs!

I have got used to them however its a nightmare when working on the building board if scanning up/down & left right so I have a different pair for close up stuff (use a set of old frames with lens set for close up).

As for flying, I don't think they help especially close up as I tend to follow the model through the changing magnification of the lens (well that's my excuse for lousy loops!) + as they are light reactive don't find they go dark enough for very bright blue skies so have a long range very dark pair (used twice this year!) again an old set of frames for these.

Jon Laughton25/09/2017 21:19:06
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1192 forum posts
72 photos

Great looking workshop David P and fully understand they rarely look pristine!😂

Edited By Jon Laughton on 25/09/2017 21:19:44

John Robertson 325/09/2017 23:06:33
185 forum posts
5 photos

I am on my first set of vari-focals. After 2 years, I'm not impressed and will be returning to bi-focals as I am happier with a clearly defined reading area. I think!

I have my benches set at standing height. For finer work, I take off the vari-focals and revert to an old pair of prescription readers or a set of cheapo Tesco £1.70 generics. For tiny stuff, I don a set of old no-idea-where-they-were-bought hand-me-down folding magnifying glasses. As per a previous post, looking out the window is a horrible experience, but they're ideal for some jobs!

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