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1/6 Westland Whirlwind

P7056 "Pride of Yeovil"

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Colin Leighfield28/01/2019 22:12:31
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5996 forum posts
2503 photos

Hi Tim. If you haven’t seen it there is a thread on this called “Westland Welkin”. I did get it to the field for a test flight but in a fit of nerves I shorted out the Lipo and wrecked it, although the plane wasn’t damaged. Also I was nervous about the weight because it needed ballast to get the c of g forward and I decided to do something about that. The intention was to replace the single Lipo in the nose with two smaller ones, one in each nacelle, forward of the very short nose. That would help to reduce the weight and get the c of g in the right place. The plane is intact and stored, as you might imagine I tend to get distracted onto other projects and take too long. I also have an o/d Hughes XF11 which flew well until the brushed motors packed in and that one is in bits awaiting a new pair of brushless motors, when I get around to it!

Neither is anything like the standard of your projects though, they are exceptional from any point of view. I’m interested in your comments about the Ki43, that has also been on my mind and I had thoughts about doing one in 1/6 scale using Depron covered with light glass cloth, which has worked very well on my “Super Marauder” Special. I have also managed to get hold of the very good Marutaka plan for a 57” version. The plane is quite simple with the fuselage sides being dead straight in plan from engine cowling to tail, all of the way. Definitely a good project. What is not generally realised is that in combat the “Hayabusa” actually was more successful than the fabled Zero, recording a higher number of “kills”. Amazing it doesn’t get more attention.

Enough though, I don’t wish to distract from this fantastic Whirlwind build!

Former Member28/01/2019 22:13:56
724 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

John Pace30/01/2019 10:18:21
4 forum posts
4 photos

whirlwind1.jpgI have watched the build of this Whirlwind with some interest ,it is
turning into a very fine model.

Earlier on in the thread mention was made of the Radio Modeller plan
of this model ,I found some old photo's the quality is not so good
as they are photographed from prints.
The model was built in 1977 and was powered by 2 OS Max 25's as the
model recommendations were for 30's to 35's there was the possibility
that it would be underpowered,the engines had been used in a Denis
Tapsfield Doublet also an RM plan a similar size model to the
Whirlwind which flew well until it fell into a hole in the ground.

The Whirlwind was the only model that i have had that ever needed
a good bit of down elevator on the take off run to ge the tail up
from then on flew almost like a trainer.
I flew it at Old Warden around about 1980 and also at the Plumpton
airshow , the Whirlwind crashed in about 88 the end of a fine model.

Looking forward to see Timo's finished Whirlwind.

Johnwhirlwind 2.jpg

Timo Starkloff03/02/2019 17:45:16
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398 forum posts
885 photos

Hello Colin, seems you have a faible for twin-engines? These are some very interesting models you've built. I already built a Hayabusa and published the plan in 1/12. It is "sport scale" since it was designed for aircombat contests. It was one of the easiest fighters to fly, no chance to stall it. A squadron from Bavaria still flies a modified version.

http://www.rc-network.de/forum/showthread.php/62376-Ki-43-Hayabusa-Baubilder

http://mfc-ettringen.de/aircombat-gruppe.html

img_2826.jpg

Timo Starkloff03/02/2019 17:48:45
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398 forum posts
885 photos

Hello Supertigrefan, if everythings goes as planned and the model is doing fine, I will publish a plan with text and manual in German and English.

Timo

Timo Starkloff03/02/2019 18:03:40
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398 forum posts
885 photos

Hello John, your Whirlwind is looking great! And it's the same year as myself

Thanks for your comments concerning flying characteristics, that's reassuring to read. It seems that the Whirlwind flies fine, no matter big or small. But the elevator is above the propeller thrust. Doesn't matter in flight but is important during start and landing. For the first flights I will use the airfield of club with a long landing strip and I will be sure to leave the model on the ground for a long run to have a safe speed for take-off.

Timo

Timo Starkloff03/02/2019 18:06:38
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398 forum posts
885 photos

Finally all parts for the nacelles are cut out. Next preparation step will be to glue doubled parts together and be sure all parts fit together.

A few parts for motor and landing gear are made from 3mm birch plywood, extra strong quality with 6 layers (upper right in the picture).

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m005.jpg

Colin Leighfield03/02/2019 19:49:29
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5996 forum posts
2503 photos

Some proper modelling here Timo and John! Just for interest, here’s the XF11. Designed as a simple build, all sheet balsa construction, no u/c for easy hand launching. 55” span if I remember correctly. It is all scale in dimension except I had to widen the slim fuselage nacelle to get the battery in. (Pre Lipo). I might be able to correct that now. Hughes XF11

Timo Starkloff10/02/2019 18:06:50
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398 forum posts
885 photos

Nice one, Colin! I like to fly these kind of small and interesting sport scale models. They're easy to build and quiet forgiving concerning landing mistakes, weather and available airfield. The goal is to transfer these characteristics to slightly bigger planes with proper retractable landing gear and working flaps.

I worked further on the nacelles. The central accumulator and landing gear box is built in many small steps. And I started building the first half of the nacelle, where I immediately found a mistake. The long and thin plywood piece with the shape of the airfoil didn't fit to all frames (which is correct: spar/frame/former?). Simple reason, I changed the position of frames several times and the last time I haven't made all corrections due to finishing the files in time for the copyshop. Too much hurry is never good...

Timo

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m007.jpg

m008.jpg

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m010.jpg

Edited By Timo Starkloff on 10/02/2019 18:07:32

Edited By Timo Starkloff on 10/02/2019 18:07:58

Colin Leighfield10/02/2019 20:06:49
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5996 forum posts
2503 photos

These things happen very easily don’t though? Even though you try carefully to be accurate errors still creep in. You will resolve it though.

Timo Starkloff14/02/2019 18:00:18
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398 forum posts
885 photos

I can think of worse things which could happen

First half is off the work bench and the next three ones are on their way. Don't want to think about building a four engine plane, that would be eight pieces...

m011.jpg

m012.jpg

m013.jpg

MAD Dave14/02/2019 18:15:12
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91 forum posts
9 photos

Where's the best place to acquire a selection of those plastic topped pins please?

Timo Starkloff14/02/2019 18:18:40
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398 forum posts
885 photos

I have a small and special story to the picture below: At the 90th anniversary of DHAeTS last year in Hatfield I -met a nice guy and his wife, who sent me that photograph afterwards. He built those wooden models in 1941-44 as a kid from scratch, according to him it was difficult to get proper material to work with. They are looking great and there's even a Whirlwind among them

We are in constant mail exchange of interesting stories. He was living in Kent and Cornwall during the war and has memories of the V1/2 attacks and the gathering of planes on D-Day. He attended DHAeTS school from 1946-49 and worked for De Havilland until 1953. The last years he was working on the Pylon magazines of the DHAeTS association. A visit at his home is planned for this year and I'm really looking forward to that!

Timo

Photo with kind permission of Ken Watkins, CEng, MRAeS

p029.jpeg

Edited By Timo Starkloff on 14/02/2019 18:33:35

Timo Starkloff14/02/2019 18:22:48
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398 forum posts
885 photos

I use the pins from Graupner, Dave. Part number is 717. But I think the material is not the same quality as years ago, a few pins have a bent top after a few times use.

https://www.graupner.de/Stossnadeln/717/

Timo

David P Williams14/02/2019 20:12:05
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913 forum posts
318 photos

Dave - Balsa Cabin have them here

alan p14/02/2019 20:58:05
267 forum posts
7 photos

dsc0249702400001.jpgdsc0249602390001.jpgHi Timo

Pictures of my whirlwind from modified 1970's plan. Now 2 part wing and homemade oleo retracts. Covered with light weight glass and water based resin. Waiting for warm weather to paint. asp 32 two stoke power. More sport scale than actual scale, 65 inch span.dsc0249502380001.jpg

 

 

 

Edited By alan p on 14/02/2019 21:03:32

Colin Leighfield14/02/2019 21:41:15
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5996 forum posts
2503 photos

It is great to see those solid scale models crafted with so much care in the hard and deprived times of WW2. These pages of model adverts are from Aircraft of the Fighting Powers, 1943. I wonder if his model kits came from these? Basically boxes containing lumps of wood to carve to shape working to the drawings and instructions that were enclosed. Not very easy! Having said I can’t get the photos to scroll in the album, it happens sometimes, I don’t know why. I will try and send them in a separate posting.

Colin Leighfield14/02/2019 21:46:13
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5996 forum posts
2503 photos

Here they are, plus a very familiar looking 5acd9e64-7e7a-45c3-8dfc-aece395a6534.jpegpage of Aeromodeller Plans Service publications!48e530cc-03e9-44dc-92cc-da2f2c58b9d0.jpeg3d8b9c98-4f23-4b26-ae7a-94af5a5f978f.jpeg0b586307-32d7-46e7-b8eb-ffbdef935e04.jpeg

mal brewer14/02/2019 23:04:30
316 forum posts
1 photos

That advert for 'Astral' kits brings back a few memories.In our house,around the mid '50's,there an Astral kit for a rubber powered Bristol Beaufighter. I believe it was produced during or very soon after the war,as all the printed sheets for wing ribs,fuselage formers etc,were not balsa,but a hard wood,looking back,I think it was obeche.It had a most unusual method of driving the props,whereby the rubber motors ran from the prop-shaft in each nacelle through the wings into the fuselage,where they were tethered.This resulted in each rubber motor being at about 30 degrees to the prop-shaft ! Totally impractical,and I would say,impossible to work.The model never got built,mind, wish I still had it !There were several models in the range,including,I think,a Halifax,all employing this strange drive system.I'm pretty certain they were designed by no less then H.J.Towner,a very well known scale modeller of the time,but how he could devise that drive system seem unreal. Does anybody else remember these kits & models ?,,,,,,,,,,Mal

Colin Leighfield15/02/2019 20:43:34
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5996 forum posts
2503 photos

Hi Mal. I never handled one of those rubber powered jobs, although I certainly remember the name of HJ Towner.

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