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Heater for my shed

Heater fo shed

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Glyn4420/01/2018 10:35:38
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703 forum posts
92 photos

i have a new workshop. A 6x8 plastic shed. I need to install some form of heater to keep my old bones warm, just wondered what would be best. I only intend it to be on whilst I’m in residence.

ChrisB20/01/2018 10:50:11
1220 forum posts
34 photos

A small oil filled radiator will do the job Glyn

**LINK**

Peter Miller20/01/2018 10:55:58
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10246 forum posts
1225 photos
10 articles

A calor gas catalytic heater, runs on a 7.5 Kg cylinder but you can use a 15 Kg cylinder outside the heater.

The Catalytic heaters are not as powerful as the normal gas heaters but fin for a 6X8 workshop. They are also much safer as there is no naked flame. just a glowing matrix.

They take a little time to warm up, a few minutes longer than the normal gas heater.

Andy C20/01/2018 10:56:44
158 forum posts

I have both oil filled and an electric blow heater in my shed. Generally only ever use the blow heater as it is more instant heat, especially on really cold days / evenings.

Mark a20/01/2018 10:58:16
321 forum posts
3 photos

I have a log burner in my 12x12 warms it up a treat.

Paul C.20/01/2018 11:10:55
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594 forum posts
150 photos

I have a gas heater on 15kg butain bottles warms up a treat but the refills are £38 but they do last a while, previously had an electric fan heater but blew balsa dust all over the place I don't clean up very often. If you use gas make sure you have good ventilation keeps you alive and avoids condensation.

Tony Harrison 220/01/2018 11:11:16
233 forum posts
3 photos

When in England my workshop is my garage, and it's impossible to heat - permanently (very) cold & damp more than half the year. Insulating and draft-proofing would be a major undertaking, cost a lot, and the results uncertain. Can hardly bring myself to work in there at this time of year, certainly for no more than half an hour. Sigh...

GeeW20/01/2018 12:20:47
110 forum posts
8 photos
2 articles

Insulation is a must to prevent lots of condensation I used a big roll of double aluminium bubble foil, stuck with heavy duty double sided carpet tape and pro-fix spray on glue for the tricky bits,which made a massive difference. Have a small fan heater as a kickstart and then an oil filled rad that stays on for the whole evening......

Edited By GeeW on 20/01/2018 12:21:52

PETER BRUCE - Eastchurch Gap20/01/2018 12:28:45
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856 forum posts
112 photos

Just as a thought for you all... I have an outside shed which l made sure was well insulated when I had it built so any form of Heating used means your only heating up the air and items inside - it’s the latter that becomes the problem. Condensation. This time of year we have high humidity so the air within your shed is quite saturated and as you apply heat you will induce the water vapour to condense on cold surfaces. My large bench vice gets soaked. Using electric heating produces less condensation however the portable Calor gas heater l also have produces much more condensation as the water produced is a by-product of the combustion. You will also need to ventilate with the latter else you could end up staying in your shed a lot longer than you anticipated if you don’t 😳

Glyn4420/01/2018 12:43:03
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703 forum posts
92 photos

Thanks good people. I’ve had a quick look at all the suggestions, the cheaper end of the calor gas heaters mostly seem to be out of stock, end of production maybe. Available ones are a couple of hundred quid, awful lot of draught Bass!

I’ve taken the point re fan heaters, but strategically placed might be ok for instant defrosting, with the oil filled rad to take over. Otherwise I’m set, DAB radio for Planet Rock, beautiful lighting, scroll, bench saws, drill press, & of course a kettle (Yorkshire Tea). Next buy is a small hobby size disc cum belt sander. **LINK** Anyone got one, or similar?

So off to Argos for the radiator, thanks all, Let’s keep warm.

Glyn.

David Ovenden20/01/2018 13:09:48
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335 forum posts
17 photos
Posted by Glyn44 on 20/01/2018 12:43:03:

I’ve taken the point re fan heaters, but strategically placed might be ok for instant defrosting, with the oil filled rad to take over. Otherwise I’m set, DAB radio for Planet Rock, beautiful lighting, scroll, bench saws, drill press, & of course a kettle (Yorkshire Tea). Next buy is a small hobby size disc cum belt sander. **LINK** Anyone got one, or similar?

So off to Argos for the radiator, thanks all, Let’s keep warm.

Glyn.

Glyn, where to you keep the models then - have you got room for them in the shed with all that other equipment?

FlyinBrian20/01/2018 13:28:00
522 forum posts

I have a 12 x 8 foot shed, fully insulated (Walls, Roof and floor) I use a thermostatically controlled oil filled electric radiator which I have only the 1KW part switched on. It is on 24 hrs a day and keeps the shed at 16 -18 Deg C. Sometimes I turn it up when working in there but its usually OK. Running costs vary with the weather but rarely more than £1 a day.

You need good insulation more than a good heater!

Dave Hayfield20/01/2018 13:43:13
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3 forum posts

I can thoroughly endorse the safety warnings of calor gas heaters in workshops. Some years ago after working for long periods in my workshop with gas heater on I was gradually feeling very ill. After a few days my wife made me go to the doctor who thought I was having a heart attack so he arranged an ambulance to take me to hospital. I was in there for a week with no further symptoms of heart problems but they decided the culprit was carbon monoxide poisoning caused by the gas heater. I now have adequate workshop ventilation and don't spend quite so much time with the heater on.

Trevor Crook20/01/2018 13:51:30
864 forum posts
65 photos

My fan heater gets to work quickly in my 10x8 wooden shed. I skinned the inside of the battens with ply when it was built to improve the insulation, but the cavity isn't filled with anything.

If your shed is on a fused spur, be careful about turning on the heater and the kettle at the same time!

Glyn4420/01/2018 14:52:59
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703 forum posts
92 photos

David, No there are no models in there. They are all over the house, garage and loft. I also have an indoor workroom, for assembly. I wanted the shed for all the dirty works, cutting, sanding etc.

I know insulation would be a boon, but might be difficult as the whole things plastic so making batten fitting difficult maybe. Although I could no doubt attempt to glue them on. I’ll look into it.

Don Fry20/01/2018 15:00:45
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4040 forum posts
45 photos

I had this model of sander, for years and very good it was. Sold it eventually, and bought a bigger version. Bigger is better, but certainly not better value for a modeller.

Look about for this machine, it's sold under loads of brands, at different prices. Long time ago now,but I think I got mine from Lidl.

Colin Bernard20/01/2018 15:04:09
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480 forum posts
81 photos

Strange to hear of problems working in a garage.

I also use my uninsulated garage as a workshop. I have a cheap B&Q fan heater to provide instant warmth, and if I am going to be in there a while, then I switch on an oil filled radiator for background warmth.

This makes the garage quite toasty at the bench end!

Gary Manuel20/01/2018 15:34:47
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1950 forum posts
1514 photos

Lidl are currently selling a fan assisted oil filled radiator. It has three power settings, is thermostatically controlled, including frost protection setting and optional fan. Looks very good. I think it comes in choice of black or white too (black should be more efficient than white).


ChrisB20/01/2018 17:42:07
1220 forum posts
34 photos

The only thing about fan heaters and other such element heaters is the risk of flash from dust.

Oil filled is the only way to go in my opinion

Piers Bowlan20/01/2018 18:11:30
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1881 forum posts
45 photos
Posted by Dave Hayfield on 20/01/2018 13:43:13:

I can thoroughly endorse the safety warnings of calor gas heaters in workshops. Some years ago after working for long periods in my workshop with gas heater on I was gradually feeling very ill. After a few days my wife made me go to the doctor who thought I was having a heart attack so he arranged an ambulance to take me to hospital. I was in there for a week with no further symptoms of heart problems but they decided the culprit was carbon monoxide poisoning caused by the gas heater. I now have adequate workshop ventilation and don't spend quite so much time with the heater on.

You should invest in one of these carbon monoxide detectors (cheap as chips and may save your life) if you are going to heat your shed with a calor gas heater. Gas heaters do produce a lot of moisture too, so not ideal for workshops with electonic gear in. I insulated my last shed with sheets of cellotex- it totally transformed it - highly recommended yes

I use an electric convector heater - or move indoors when it gets too cold!

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