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Electric Cars.

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cymaz30/04/2019 06:20:11
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8652 forum posts
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I deliver for Jewson, working on the civils side, so go to all the big housing projects regularly here in Cornwall.

Not one new build in the last 5 years has a solar panel on the roof. The panels are covering valuable food productive land. 

Edited By cymaz on 30/04/2019 06:20:39

Edited By cymaz on 30/04/2019 06:21:43

Trevor Crook30/04/2019 06:53:44
849 forum posts
65 photos

Yes, that's where a major impact on grid generation could be made. If all suitable new builds were forced to fit solar pv panels and storage batteries, a lot of extra power would be produced locally. Instead, it's been mandated that all new builds from 2025 will have no mains gas supply, so where is all the extra power for heating going to come from?

Piers Bowlan30/04/2019 07:07:22
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Perhaps to legislate for compulsory PV panels on new builds is problematical as not all new house builds are suitable, with no South facing elevations or roofs etc. Maybe the hope is that ground/air source heat pumps will be fitted, although they are not always viable either. indecision

Denis Watkins30/04/2019 07:59:41
3877 forum posts
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Posted by Piers Bowlan on 30/04/2019 07:07:22:

Perhaps to legislate for compulsory PV panels on new builds is problematical as not all new house builds are suitable, with no South facing elevations or roofs etc. Maybe the hope is that ground/air source heat pumps will be fitted, although they are not always viable either. indecision

Spot on Piers, Panels are financially problematic

People selling houses are finding that they don't own their Panels, they are leased

And the new owners of your house, may not want panels, or they need a new lease

It is an additional money spinner for Estate Agents and another obstacle for home movers

In some areas, new home owners do not own their own roof, the space is owned by power providers

This is a tangle that needs sorting in the clean energy future

IDD1501/05/2019 08:45:50
123 forum posts

Range anxiety sorted!

RAC News

A somewhat ironic solution though! smiley

Piers Bowlan01/05/2019 11:22:51
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1869 forum posts
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Fast charging does not do batteries any good as we all know, shortening their life and increasing the cost of the cars. Likewise, fast discharging damages them too so larger, heavier batteries are required for when heavy current demands are required (heavy loads, hills, accelerating). Ultra Capacitors  smooth out these peaks so that an electric car fitted with ultra capacitors (as well as batteries) can be very fast charged and then driven away whilst the ultra capacitors recharge the batteries at a more leisurely pace. Consequently, smaller, lighter, cheaper, batteries can be fitted. Works well with regenerative braking too apparently, if you follow the link to the (rather long) video.

Edited By Piers Bowlan on 01/05/2019 11:27:16

Nigel R01/05/2019 12:25:28
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3058 forum posts
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Piers, you're quite right.

Fast charging is the headline sales pitch.

But the thing is, for our everyday use (and I appreciate this is my own take on my own situation, in my defence I am quite "2.4 children" with my present needs) if I commuted every day in my hypothetical electric car, it would be charged overnight at the slow speed. And a handful of times a year, on a holiday trip or what have you, it would get a few fast charges to make the trip.

So the amount of fast charges that a pack would suffer, is in reality, at least for most vehicles, quite a small number. Perhaps not something that dramatically reduces pack life?

(yes, there will be habitual long distance users who this doesn't apply to, but I believe my use is pretty much "the average family car"

Percy Verance01/05/2019 16:13:03
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8108 forum posts
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IDD

I can't recall who it was, but one of the big insurers has launched a dedicated electric car policy. One of the benefits being recovery to the nearest charge point if you need it.

IDD1501/05/2019 17:31:58
123 forum posts

Nigel

Whilst I agree with your analysis re fast charging you do need to take into account regen braking in an EV. Fundamentally good fast regen is critical in an EV in order to recover energy, and this is where buffering the pack with super caps would really come into its own.

As a real world example I have found when travelling from Manchester to Leeds I use a lot less energy than when going home the other way. Basically when going W to E the car has a much longer distance over which it can recover energy on the drive down from Saddleworth Moor. I got well and truly caught by this the first time I did the return trip in the Leaf, fortunately the Ecotricty rapid chargers at Birch services saved the day. Topography plays a significant role when your electric fuel tank holds the equivalent of less than a gallon of petrol!

Idd

IDD1501/05/2019 17:36:55
123 forum posts

Percy

I think most EV car makers offer this service as a freebie on new EV's. But if we are to have a flourishing secondhand EV market then the RAC may well help this along!

Idd

Piers Bowlan01/05/2019 17:41:06
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1869 forum posts
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Obviously Ultra Capacitors have a weight and a cost but their potential to reduce the number of batteries whilst extending their range, life and performance by being more efficient, looks very attractive and potentially a game changer for manufacturers who use them.

One of the problems highlighted in the video is the fact that currently (ops sorry!) there are so many different chemistry's and battery designs in use that the industry doesn't have any standardisation with the associated economies of scale. A great pity. Perhaps if a new type of battery was developed that was a step change in performance/efficiency then all car manufacturers would have little choice but to adopt it. Then watch the unit cost tumble.

A dedicated electric car policy sounds good Percy but I am not too sure about combining it with electric breakdown cover. I think I would rather pay the RAC or green flag for that.

Percy Verance01/05/2019 17:55:56
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8108 forum posts
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Piers

I think most motor policies offering breakdown cover do have it with Green Flag or the RAC. I'm with Hastings Direct, and the policy I have gives me RAC cover. I have my own cover anyway from Start Rescue. They knock the others into a cocked hat for price, and come with a Which recommendation. Their service seems prompt too. My good lady's Fiesta has it's battery fail on our drive one Sunday morning a little while back. About an hour and a bit later, a new battery had been fitted and she was on her way. 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 01/05/2019 18:18:38

Percy Verance10/05/2019 06:46:46
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8108 forum posts
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I just noted VW have announced that pre-ordering is now open for their new Golf - sized 100% electric hatchback ( to be named I D 3)

Pre - orders exceeded 10,000 after just 24 hours...... That probably still doesn't come close to Kia or Hyundai though. Kia have over 7000 orders in Norway alone for their eNiro, and the Hyundai Kona electric sold out for 2019 earlier this year.

That said, VW are re-organising one of their largest plants in Eastern Germany. It will produce only electric vehicles, plus it is also to have a battery manufacturing facility......

I have also seen a suggestion that Kia are looking to establish a production facility here in the UK. Swindon could be good.

 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 10/05/2019 06:57:25

J D 810/05/2019 08:31:52
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1254 forum posts
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Solid state battery's may well change our outlook on electric cars in the next few years, promising higher charge density, faster charging as standard and safety as they do not burn like a lipo can.

Nigel R10/05/2019 08:46:47
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3058 forum posts
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Lots of promises on new battery types, but very little materialises. But there is a lot of incremental improvements happening with "current format" lithium chemistry cells - the near term future belongs squarely with lithium.

A massive capacitor may have some potential to smooth out regen braking. Present day ultra caps are very low current capability if I remember rightly, they are out there but not receiving widespread use, there are reasons for that. The high current high cap devices have been five years away for ten years now. Perhaps they will be on the technology roadmap in the future but I don't see it for a while yet.

Interesting times, whatever happens.

J D 810/05/2019 09:12:47
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1254 forum posts
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I have to disagree Nigel, I recon lithium has just about gone as far as it can. Companies like Toyota, Dyson [Sacti3] are putting millions into solid state battery research. As you say interesting times and we will see. John.

Don Fry10/05/2019 13:50:45
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3920 forum posts
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JD 8, when the technology matures, there are going to be some very big winners, and losers. Spending 100 s of millions is chickenfeed, to hope you are not history, one of the losers. As Nigel says, solid state is only one candidate, and one of the solid state candidates is a lipo solid state hibred, and in theory, if you can developed the anodes, cathodes, lipo can deliver more volts per cell at the same capacity than at present, even without solid state.

Percy Verance10/05/2019 16:58:50
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8108 forum posts
155 photos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A few interesting snippets here ..... **LINK**

Jaguar are sourcing packs from Coventry Hyperbat for their iPace, as it seems are Aston Martin for their Rapide E......

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

Edited By Percy Verance on 10/05/2019 16:59:08

Edited By Percy Verance on 10/05/2019 17:00:33

Percy Verance31/05/2019 20:05:26
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8108 forum posts
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For those whom remain interested in developments, Ionity have opened the first of their 40 planned 350kw charging stations in the UK. It is at Junction 8 of the M20 at Maidstone. All the 350kw sites are to use renewable energy, and all will have both online and on site 24hr support. A flat rate of £7 will be charged irrespective of the amount of charge required.

Cars capable of up to 350kw charge rates are to begin arriving in 2020, with Porsche being one of the first manufacturers to make use of the higher charge rate. Ionity claim that average top up times could be as low as 8 minutes. They also state that at a 350kw rate it is possible to add over 200 miles of range in as little as 10 minutes using a CCS cable.

And for those whom have no on-street charging facility, or whom may live in an apartment, Chinese company Nio have developed a van based charging system using a generator. They claim to be able to offer up to about 60 miles of range in 10 minutes...... The system will remain in China intially, although it may yet appear on other markets. It sounds similar to the system recently introduced by the RAC.

I've also read that Ferrari are to introduce their first hybrid soon.

 

 

 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 31/05/2019 20:18:19

Don Fry31/05/2019 20:19:44
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I know we fall out Percy, and I don't wish to provoke, but would you care to explain, how Ionity filter the electricity so it's renewable.

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