By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by CML

Electric Cars.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Percy Verance07/07/2019 17:57:30
avatar
8109 forum posts
155 photos

You may indeed still be driving your gas guzzler in 2030 Rich. Just how much you'll be driving it and how far, may well be open to speculation...........

And yes, we will all see. Changing times ahead......

Percy Verance07/07/2019 17:57:32
avatar
8109 forum posts
155 photos

You may indeed still be driving your gas guzzler in 2030 Rich. Just how much you'll be driving it and how far, may well be open to speculation...........

And yes, we will all see. Changing times ahead......

Percy Verance07/07/2019 18:16:01
avatar
8109 forum posts
155 photos

The cost at the moment is something of a barrier Rich, but this is almost certain to lower once the uptake increases. It certainly doesn't seem to be holding back the success of Jaguar's iPace, the Kia eNiro or the Hyundai Kona. Both the Hyundai and Kia are completely sold out for 2019. I even read somewhere there are over 7000 outstanding orders in Norway alone for the Kia eNiro. I think I'd have one myself if I could get one. An extremely practical modellers car with a genuine 250 mile range. The wait is about a year, but of course by the time you've waited a year, such seems to be change in pace, things will have moved on further still. 

Prices will ease once they begin selling in even greater numbers. I remember buying a Nikon digital camera about 12 years ago. It was a 3 megapixel model costing £459. You can now get an 18 megapixel job for about £100. New tech always costs more when it's fresh to the market. Prices will ease Rich, be in no doubt.....

So yes Rich, the cost is astronomical right now, but so are the savings if an electric car fits your motoring profile. Electric Vehicle Man on YouTube is running the second of two Nissan Leafs (Leaves?) he's had, and he keeps a close eye on his costs. He quite recently posted an update, stating the last 10k miles had cost £135 in electricity. He's on an EV tarriff with Octopus Energy. Both he and his wife use the Leaf, which covers 20K miles per year. He has very recently ordered a Kia eNiro, knowing he'll be waiting about a year before he gets it. I did watch his road test though ( on YouTube of course) and he was most impressed, hence he decided to go for one.....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 07/07/2019 18:33:54

Don Fry07/07/2019 20:04:12
avatar
3827 forum posts
42 photos

A small reality check.

2018 sales figures, UK.

The biggest gains proportionally were made by alternatively-fuelled vehicles (AFVs), up 20.9% in 2018, although they still only made up 6% of the total market, with 141,270 registrations. Of these, 81,323 were hybrids, 44,437 were plug-in hybrid and 15,474 were pure-electric.

And the top seller, Ford Fiesta, just under a 100,000 units, all fuel sources,

The hugely successful Jaguar I Pace, just under 1500 units.

i too might wait a while to change my car.

Wingman07/07/2019 21:52:22
avatar
1093 forum posts
404 photos

It's the range thing that always bothers me about electric cars.

I recently drove 450 miles which took me about 8 hours where I stopped once for fuel, twice for 'comfort' and once for 30 minutes for lunch. I travelled at 80 mph where possible.

I was wondering if anybody on here has done a similar sort of distance in an electric vehicle and, if so, would they like to share their journey details so I can get some sort of idea how that sort of range is covered electrically.

Percy Verance07/07/2019 22:04:47
avatar
8109 forum posts
155 photos

Obviously you were not travelling on the M6........

It's been done a while ago by some bloke in a Leaf Wingman. In fact he travelled from Land's End to John 'O Groats and back again, before driving to somewhere in Eastern Europe to top it off.

In fact the bloke is Chris Ramsey, and he drove about 10k miles in total Wingman. He ended up in Russia......

 

 

 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 07/07/2019 22:11:52

ken anderson.08/07/2019 08:03:11
avatar
8425 forum posts
772 photos

1% of last years car sales were electric....probably be at least 21/2230 before the change over is complete as planned...and by then if we are still in existence...there will be an alternative and all the electric jobs will be dinosaurs...

ken anderson...ne..1.... ...2230 dept.

Nigel R08/07/2019 09:16:47
avatar
2981 forum posts
471 photos

"It's the range thing that always bothers me about electric cars."

A solvable problem. As we've said many times before on this thread I think, the answer there is a hybrid.

If you have charging facilities, 95% of your driving, the daily commute, run to the shops, etc, can be within range of the electric bit. For the other 5%, a petrol generator is on board.

Alternatively, if you have nowhere to (regularly) charge, everything is by petrol.

Or, get an electric bike/scooter for one man commuter journeys and keep the dinosaur for the occasional long distance. Many ways to skin the cat.

Dickw08/07/2019 10:01:36
avatar
449 forum posts
74 photos
Posted by Wingman on 07/07/2019 21:52:22:

It's the range thing that always bothers me about electric cars.

I recently drove 450 miles which took me about 8 hours where I stopped once for fuel, twice for 'comfort' and once for 30 minutes for lunch. I travelled at 80 mph where possible.

I was wondering if anybody on here has done a similar sort of distance in an electric vehicle and, if so, would they like to share their journey details so I can get some sort of idea how that sort of range is covered electrically.

Last weekend I was at an international model competition near Ashford in Kent. After the competition finished on Sunday morning a friend of mine, and one of the UK competitors, set out about lunch time to drive back to Scotland in his 100 mile range electric car. He got home Tuesday evening (yes, 2 overnight stops).

Approx 380 miles as the crow flies so probably around the 450 mile mark driven. I am sure he could have done it with just one overnight stop and longer days driving. I think he has a 2 hour charge time.

Dick

Gary Manuel08/07/2019 11:02:35
avatar
1873 forum posts
1507 photos

I know very little about electric cars, but out of growing interest, I had a look at what having a charger installation actually involves as I live in a 1930's house with a power supply that probably isn't up to the job - especially as the demand for electric cars grows.

The best that is possible from a single phase supply is a dedicated 7kW charger (the equivalent of an electric shower) that can charge at about 30 Miles per hour or roughly 10 hours for a full charge (assuming 300 miles range cars are soon available). If you resort to using a 13A socket, the charge rate is about 8 Miles per hour or roughly 37 hours for a full charge!!!!

The super fast charge rates seen in manufacturers waffle that only need something like 30 minutes to charge to 80% capacity are only available from a dedicated 3-phase power supply charger. These will never be available to domestic consumers. I suspect that the few low cost (free?) to use fast chargers that are currently available are there as an incentive to encourage people to switch to electric. If the future is for more of these to be fitted at petrol stations for example, I suspect that the price of usage will be more on a par with the cost of filling up with petrol.

Andy Meade08/07/2019 11:33:09
avatar
2596 forum posts
679 photos

Our Mitsubishi PHEV charges from a 13A socket, from empty to full in 4 hours. This gets us 40 miles in the summer, easily enough for the other half's daily commute. We get a reduced rate through our energy supplier for charging at off peak times, and when she's at work the charger there is free. £45 petrol lasts 1600 miles, and it costs £1.75 to charge to full at home. Long trips aren't a problem, as we use the petrol generator then, and have stopped at services to charge to 90% in about 40 minutes from the fast chargers (some will cost, some don't). Enough time for a coffee and toilet break.

The PHEV has a huge boot, even more so with the back seats forward, goes like stink when you floor it, and even recharges the battery through kinetic energy recovery when breaking. We love it, and are sure that we'll replace it with another when the time comes, and no doubt mine will be electric too when I get around to changing mine.

It's the future.

Gary Manuel08/07/2019 11:50:05
avatar
1873 forum posts
1507 photos

40 miles range doesn't sound like a lot Andy, but to be honest would cover most of my dog walking / model flying / shopping journeys.

You then have the advantage of the Petrol Hybrid system which takes away all the worry of getting stuck. I agree that the PHEV is the most sensible way forward, but that is not what we are talking about here. We are talking about pure electrics, which is the long term planned future of cars.

Don Fry08/07/2019 12:43:11
avatar
3827 forum posts
42 photos

Long term planned future. Where does that phrase come from. What cars we drive is driven by taxation, and the ability of government to enforce taxation, restrictions on the use of cars, and again the ability of authority to enforce it.

I see precious little planning, just polititions, giving mouthroom to sound bites.

Pure electric is a coming technology, but there can be no planning around what has not been invented. And I don't believe this thread is restrictive to pure electric vehicles.

Andy, does your car come into the plug in electric class?

Percy Verance08/07/2019 13:11:38
avatar
8109 forum posts
155 photos

So what's the problem Gary? Unless you're doing a 50 mile or more each way commute, you'd simply charge overnight on 7kw, as most EV owners already do. A 6hr charge even by your own reckoning will give you a further 180 miles of range. And if you need a faster charge rate then you could ultimately go to wherever you buy your petrol or diesel. Both Shell and BP have purchased EV charging networks, and are presently siting chargers on all their garage forecourts. And both Morrisons and Tesco are installing chargers on their sites - 2400 chargers in Tesco's sites. These may be free for customers too. Other supermarkets are to follow suit. If you buy food Gary, you could charge there.  

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is one of the more practical hybrids. Some other hybrids are only capable of just a few miles on electric only. A bit pointless really. My former boss wasn't over-impressed after 3 years of Mitsubishi PHEV ownership though. He's replaced his with a Vauxhall Grandland diesel. He did have his share of problems with it though, so that's obviously put him off another.

You didn't mention that you'd get a £500 grant from the Government towards the home charger installation cost Gary? Perhaps you didn't know?  You do need to prove you own an EV first though...... And Gary, you're assuming you'd charge from flat each time. That almost certainly wouldn't be the case though, would it?  

 

 

 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 08/07/2019 13:38:52

Bruce Collinson08/07/2019 13:38:22
384 forum posts

Colleague acquired a BMW i3 (?) for work, greatly against mainstream viewpoint as our business sometimes demands quite long routes and by the time he's driven to work via school it has to be plugged in (charge point cost north of 2 grand) before it can safely go anywhere distant. Really fed up of the proselytising . Pulled up whilst on the phone, didn't want to switch neutrons off in case the handsfree crashed, finished call, got out, car ran through shop window.

Unfortunately, the car is repairable, as well as the Co-op's shopfront. Might use a lot of carbons to mend though.

Worth the £500 excess just for the silence.

BTC

Percy Verance08/07/2019 13:40:23
avatar
8109 forum posts
155 photos

That's the one Bruce, BMW i3. Half BMW, half wart.

I'm struggling to get why the charge point cost in excess of 2k?  This is a charge point at his place of work I assume?

I've been quoted about £800 for a 7kw installation at my home. I'd pay around £300. The Government grant covers the rest.

It appears your work colleague bought the wrong BMW i3. He perhaps out to have chosen the range extender version. This has a twin cylinder petrol engine, to get you to the nearest charge point. He may well have been better off choosing a different car altogether. A Toyota Prius perhaps?

I seem to recall George Michael drove BMW's too. He also had something of a penchant for demolishing shop fronts. wink

 

 

 

 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 08/07/2019 14:04:10

Gary Manuel08/07/2019 14:22:24
avatar
1873 forum posts
1507 photos

Yes Percy, I did know about the heavy discounts that are currently available for charge point installation. I've no intention of going electric yet. I was just curious about the feasibility of having a fast charger at home as my instinct was that charging to 80% capacity in 30 minutes was not possible. It isn't and never will be, but as you say, most of the time it will be a quick topup to cover the few miles you've done.

I'd probably manage OK with a 13A plug in charger for the mileage I cover, but a 7kW charging point makes a lot of sense. Main problem is that with everyone getting home from work at around the same time, the 7kW's from every house on the street (in the country) is going to add up.

P.S. I've just become aware of "rapid chargers" and the different range of connectors that are available. I think I'll stick to model aeroplanes. Far simpler.

Percy Verance08/07/2019 16:57:15
avatar
8109 forum posts
155 photos

It's a given that we all have to sleep at some point Gary. The vast majority of UK electric car owners charge their car while they're asleep, usually on a cheap rate tarriff. Electricity demand is much lower through the night, with much spare capacity. Quite a few energy suppliers now have dedicated EV tarriffs. A good top up charge might cost around £3 to £4. The downside of course is that you'll have a higher charge per kwh through the day, which is fine if you don't use much in the daytime. If you're fortunate enough to have a 3 or 4kw solar panel array on your roof, or a storage battery, then you will be able to offset the higher cost through the day if you need to. So no Gary, not everyone will get home from work and bang the car on charge right away. Most electric cars have a charge timer. You'd connect everything up, set the timer for the start and stop time, then go to bed.

There aren't that many different connectors Gary. The most common type is the Type 2. Tesla have tended to use their own connector in the past, but the new ( to the UK ) Model 3 uses the more common type 2. Some types of adaptor are available for cross connection, as are longer charge cables if you arrive at a charge point and find you've been ICED. Meaning an i.c. vehicle has parked in the EV charging bay.

Gary the rapid (350kw) chargers you mention are a relatively recent development. The first one in the UK has very recently opened near Maidstone. A total of 40 are planned for the UK. Ok, at the moment there aren't any cars on the market capable of taking a 350kw charge, but the first - a Porsche - is set to arrive next year. More will surely follow. Tesla are upgrading their own network too Gary. The aim there is for Tesla drivers to be able to add 75 miles of range in 5 minutes. Is this the sort of charge you're thinking of?

Sure, there's a way to go yet Gary but things will look very different in five years time...........

Model aeroplanes far simpler?  Perhaps not after November Gary........

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 08/07/2019 17:02:52

Cuban808/07/2019 17:06:46
2640 forum posts
13 photos

Just back from ASDA supermarket and am pleased to report that after what must be three years since they were installed, the four charging bays near the shop entrance have a clear sign saying that non- electric cars will be issued with a penalty if they're parked there. About time . The inconsiderate or plain bone idle, will have to park elsewhere now.

Gary Manuel08/07/2019 17:15:19
avatar
1873 forum posts
1507 photos

Wake me up in five years time. I might have another think about electric cars then.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of RCM&E? Use our magazine locator link to find your nearest stockist!

Find RCM&E! 

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Cambridge Gliding Club
Wings & Wheels 2019
Gliders Distribution
Slec
CML
electricwingman 2017
Addlestone Models
Pepe Aircraft
Sarik
Advertise With Us
Latest "For Sale" Ads
New Poll - Sticky situations...
Q: How often - when using superglue - do you end up with it on your fingers?

 Every time
 Occasionally
 Sometimes
 Rarely
 Never
 Wear rubber gloves

Latest Reviews
Digital Back Issues

RCM&E Digital Back Issues

Contact us

Contact us