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What Happens Next

A talk on dealing with accidents and medical emergencies at the flying field

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C Anderson01/02/2018 19:07:13
29 forum posts

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT

Open to all BMFA Members it could be you next

It's been a great days flying when suddenly there's a thud followed by a scream

"MY FINGERS ARE OFF"

Panic takes over but should it?

How bad is it?

What do you do next?

Has your club been proactive for such a situation?

First aid pack available?

BMFA suggest don't fly on your own so help could be available

This talk is about a having a plan for any situation that may occur on the field and what members can do to help. Our speaker retired Dr.Richard Wilkins ( Retford member ) will cover how a club can help members with knowledge of what to do next ,basic first aid and what to do if someone has a cardiac arrest, in both cases time is a key factor. Andy Simonds will be on handed to answer any BMFA related questions after the talk.

The BMFA news has covered articles on a number of serious incidents involving both electric and powered aircraft.

“The initiative being run by the Midland area with Retford Model Flying Club to provide a Basic Field First Aid course for members is a great example of how clubs and the BMFA Areas can support members.

The club are in a fortunate position in having a retired doctor within the membership who is running the course, also the offer idea of providing a free supper is a good incentive to get members together.

Hopefully other clubs will pick up on the idea and do something similar.

Well done to the Retford MFC Committee.”

Manny Williamson

BMFA Development Officer

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT

Free pie and peas. Booking via email only (will be confirmed via email) a voucher will be available on arrival at the talk.

Free pie and peas please email to book your voucher

Email: secretary.rmfc@sky.com

Contact Chris Anderson

Start time 1945hrs

Date Monday 19th February

Venue Babworth Rd Sports and Social Club

Babworth Rd

Retford

Notts

DN22 7NJ

ken anderson.01/02/2018 19:28:34
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8067 forum posts
729 photos

what happens next?..................

here is my tale of woe..a couple of years ago we had an elderly member who had an accident(his IC model ran forward and chopped into his forearm) I attempted to stem the low of blood while another member phoned for an ambulance...this is where the fun started trying to explain where you are(in a field down by the seafront of your town)sounds ok to you -but to someone in a far off control room-you might as well be speaking Chinese. After several go's at describing where we were the ambulance set off and eventually found us after 30-45 min's....they said it was impossible trying to home in on us.at our next club meeting we decided to have the co-ordinates for our site made into a plate fixed to our seats at the site-so as any future calls to the 999 lad's would be no problem for them attending asap,we also told all(100)+ members.

the lad who had the accident needed a fair bit of work to his arm and was told he had lost a lot of the red stuff...... I would urge all clubs to ensure that the members know exactly the address where they are flying-just in case...

ken Anderson...ne....1.....accident dept..

Paul C.01/02/2018 20:08:40
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447 forum posts
110 photos

Good point ken, we broke down on the m5 two years ago out with the mobile phone to the aa. Where are you _ m5, what junction - don't know, any visible land marks - not really, what was the last junction you passed - errrr not sure. Ended up walking up the hard shoulder to find a phone that had a number on it much to the displeasure of the operator who was sure I was trying to kill myself .

The moral of the tale is if you don't know where you are and you get into trouble you are in trouble.

Paul. Poop department

Don Fry01/02/2018 21:14:18
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2543 forum posts
30 photos

This is a common problem. In relation to motors, I once stuck my hand, don't ask, through the prop arc of a 46 twin needle 2 stroke, at full throttle.

The motor stopped. I assessed the damage, wrapped the hand, ( turned things off ), and walked away. And sought help.

And to this day, I don't work engines much bigger on my own. It needed real concentration to function over the pain.

And on a different note, I once got involved, with a part time fireman, dragging a biker out of the river, SW France, serious back of behind. Now this poor sod was alive(ish) when we got him out. He has two qualified first aiders working on him, both with life/death experience. He breathed, and not, and breathed, and not, and not. And 40 minutes later, a crew found two knackered first aiders, and a corpse. It is important to know where you are if possible.

Geoff Sleath01/02/2018 21:28:59
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2713 forum posts
199 photos

My wife was out cycling with a group in the lanes near Derby when a milk lorry over took them fast and close. She swerved onto the rough grass verge, fell off and broke her collar bone. They phoned for an ambulance and told them exactly where they were on a long, well known but narrow lane that leads west from Derby but the ambulance had no idea where it was. In fact, her friends phoned me at home, over 10 miles away and I arrived at the same time as the ambulance.

I think you could give them an accurate OS map reference and they'd still not know where it was, probably because the ambulance service isn't very local and don't know their way around. We once broke down in our car one evening and asked the rescue service to take the car to the dealer where we bought it about 5 miles away at most and he had no idea where it was despite its being on what had once been the main Derby/Nottingham road before it was by-passed.

I put it down to the prevalence of GPS navigation, which I hate because it's like travelling with blinkers on. GPS certainly has its uses (especially for the last mile of a journey) but you can't beat a proper map to give you a proper relationship to the geography of where you are. I suppose I'm odd but we have 2 bookcase shelves crammed with maps - most of them OS 1:50k and 1:25k

Geoff

Geoff

Paul C.01/02/2018 22:11:27
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447 forum posts
110 photos

Before sat navigation we used aa route finder, printed off a route turn left turn right at the next island etc. Everything was fine until I took a wrong turn and was unable to find my way back onto the aa route. My wife is not very good at differentiating between left and right, I am looking at the sun to work out if we are heading north or south. I put my faith in sat navy , saves my sanity and my marriage. wink

Geoff Sleath01/02/2018 22:53:03
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2713 forum posts
199 photos

I'm lucky because my wife is the best map reader in the world (BMRITW). She used to do a lot of scooter rallies before we met and I put her right about motor cycles and was very competent at even using so-called 'tulip' diagrams for navigation. Oddly enough if you take away the map she has almost zero sense of direction, whereas I can imagine the map and usually fond my way to places I've been before.

Geoff

Paul C.01/02/2018 23:16:21
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447 forum posts
110 photos

Oh the old scooter trips in the late 60s Vespa 150 to north Wales best leave it there wink , I always thought that I could find my way to most places until I had to go to Kingston upon Thames using aa route finder teeth. It was a work job then they told me I had to go again 2 weeks later, insisted on train and tube to get me there and back , never driving in that madness again devil

Paul.

cymaz02/02/2018 03:19:39
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7687 forum posts
987 photos
Posted by Paul C. on 01/02/2018 20:08:40:

Good point ken, we broke down on the m5 two years ago out with the mobile phone to the aa. Where are you _ m5, what junction - don't know, any visible land marks - not really, what was the last junction you passed - errrr not sure. Ended up walking up the hard shoulder to find a phone that had a number on it much to the displeasure of the operator who was sure I was trying to kill myself .

The moral of the tale is if you don't know where you are and you get into trouble you are in trouble.

Paul. Poop department

There are marker posts on the road verges of duals and motorways. In an emergency read the nearest marker post number and the services should know where you are.....in theory

cymaz02/02/2018 03:27:39
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7687 forum posts
987 photos
Posted by Geoff Sleath on 01/02/2018 22:53:03:

I'm lucky because my wife is the best map reader in the world (BMRITW). She used to do a lot of scooter rallies before we met and I put her right about motor cycles and was very competent at even using so-called 'tulip' diagrams for navigation. Oddly enough if you take away the map she has almost zero sense of direction, whereas I can imagine the map and usually fond my way to places I've been before.

Geoff

Sorry Geoff, I have to disagree. My wife is the best map reader in the worldlaugh. Been driving around Europe a bit, never used sat nav, she is brilliant..

john stones 102/02/2018 10:15:27
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9673 forum posts
1435 photos

We have address and post code on notice board, first aid kits are carried by a few of us, had our share of mishaps at field and they've all been dealt with fine. Most folk our age have first aid experience or done courses via work. Been night fishing on my own, walking dog in woods on my own, hitch hiked on my own, worked on my own and I go flying on my own, no intention of stopping that or denying other members the choice. Life comes with a certain amount of risk, some folk even jump out of aeroplanes for fun. crook

Martin Harris02/02/2018 10:23:33
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7689 forum posts
191 photos

I believe that emergency services can respond to GPS co-ordinates. We have the field coordinates posted in the clubhouse (and on the pegboard which is largely unused these days).

Robert Cracknell02/02/2018 10:46:58
86 forum posts
4 photos

I remember a few years back I was on a back road to nowhere and came across a fire. Dialled 999 on my mobile and was about to try to explain my location when the operator said she had my location courtesy of the mobile signal. Sure enough the fire brigade arrived about 10 minutes later.

Also if anyone can remember the football match fixing scandal some years back the court was told exactly which parking bay one of the accused was sitting in at Stansted services when he made an alleged call on his mobile.

Also in the recent case of the disappearance of airman Corrie Mcgeague the police traced his last movements from his mobile signal.

The technology is clearly there, it just needs someone to get their backside into gear to make it more widely usable.

Denis Watkins09/02/2018 10:06:12
2901 forum posts
141 photos

Just to add, if your field has a gate it is usually locked behind you, then always fly with at least FOUR flyers

In an emergency, one needs to go up to the gate and on hand to point the service in the direction of the casualty.

One needs to stay with the casualty for observation and comfort

And one on the phone, as the operator talks to you continuously until the Ambulance arrives

If you have no gate or concealed track to the field, then maybe fly with Two, but would advise THREE

Otherwise, really do consider not flying alone

Edited By Denis Watkins on 09/02/2018 10:08:34

Edited By Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator on 09/02/2018 14:37:11

Jon Laughton09/02/2018 10:50:15
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1079 forum posts
90 photos

This seems a good idea and I have passed it up the chain for someone in our club to think about attending.

Andy perhaps this is something to be considered on a national rather than area basis?

Jon

Edited By Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator on 09/02/2018 14:38:08

The Wright Stuff09/02/2018 11:18:59
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1253 forum posts
225 photos

With respect to Denis' comments about not flying alone, I think that while it may not be ideal, we have to recognise that it happens, in some cases very frequently. I very often fly alone. If I didn't, I'd hardly fly at all.

Therefore like-it-or-not, it seems that self-help should also be a useful topic to cover. I have a mobile phone, and a car door pocket full of bandages and finger cots. Could I do something useful with my one good hand? I hope so!

Edited By Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator on 09/02/2018 14:38:45

Tim Flyer09/02/2018 12:13:43
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737 forum posts
107 photos

If you have a smartphone and are frequently off road etc, I would also recommend downloading the “Echo112”app as it alerts emergency services plus provides a grid reference it’s international too.

Edited By Timothy Harris 1 on 09/02/2018 12:14:47

Edited By Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator on 09/02/2018 14:39:37

Wilco Wingco09/02/2018 12:19:54
95 forum posts
3 photos

I admire The Wright Stuffs first aid kit, which we should all carry, but I would dispute his presence of mind to do something useful with his one good hand. A grazed knuckle while adjusting the mixture or a slight nick on the wrist while removing the glow start from the front yes but a major gash after sticking ones fingers in a prop, I doubt it. I speak from a sad accident I had a couple of years ago after doing just that, all I could think about was "shit it hurts". One of my buddies drove me to A&E while another collected models etc and took them home. Five hours later suitably stitched and glued I left A&E and was driven home. Never fly alone. It only takes a split second of inattention and a nasty accident can happen. blush

Edited By Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator on 09/02/2018 14:40:23

The Wright Stuff09/02/2018 12:50:46
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1253 forum posts
225 photos

Well, the issue of lone flying itself I guess is off-topic, so I'll leave it there.

I asked a question and expressed a hope - I made no assertions about my likely state of mind. However, given I was flying alone, and given that I chopped off a finger, I see no harm in asking the question: 'what are my self help options?' What's the alternative? Sit there, accept death, and quietly bleed out?

Edited By Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator on 09/02/2018 14:40:50

ken anderson.09/02/2018 13:13:05
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8067 forum posts
729 photos

Flying alone, dodgy to do,chop something major...and you'll dress it yourself!!!!! I don't think so-and years ago there was an article that if it was a bad cut or whatever--the poor victim would probably pass out with shock-and possibly bleed to death time they were out.....flying alone isn't really the done thing even more so if you are somewhere out of the way............... I appreciate that some people have no option-but take care... have a google-you'll find some horrible photo's of mangled carol singer's...........

 

ken Anderson...ne...1...... mangled carol singers(fingers) dept.

Edited By Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator on 09/02/2018 14:42:20

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