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Bomb Dropping from my Super 60

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Cliff 195925/03/2018 20:38:41
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A fun morning was had by all as I placed the model for a bomb drop.

Paul Marsh25/03/2018 21:50:06
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Chris and I were dropping bombs today, Good fun and practices flying accuracy.

Percy Verance25/03/2018 22:46:38
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Be sure to check your insurance covers this........ it may not.

Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator25/03/2018 23:04:06
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Oh well, this thread title should get the secret squirrels' attention!

BEB

Chris Barlow26/03/2018 00:20:10
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Brilliant Cliff! Paul & I had a go today to as he said above.

No problems with the insurance either, I didn't hit the runway once! laugh

Percy Verance26/03/2018 07:58:09
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I mentioned it earlier because I'd read somewhere that display flying - using models which dropped sweets for children's entertainment - had to be stopped on potential safety grounds, in case one of the sweets hit someone in the eye...... Bomb (sweet) dropping for kids used to happen a lot at Woodvale back in the 70's.

If I recall, this followed not long after the incident involving the 2oz chuck glider, which, as some will know, resulted in one of the largest ever successful insurance claims the BMFA had seen.....

Apologies for being a ray of sunshine, but it did actually happen.......

 

 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 26/03/2018 08:14:31

john stones 126/03/2018 08:24:44
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We used to have bomb drop on our comp days, used a 2km tape measure, bomber Harris would not have been impressed.

Percy Verance26/03/2018 08:31:27
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I don't think there were that many things that impressed Bomber Harris John.

Certainly, the policeman who stopped his car when he was on his way to a meeting didn't impress him over much. The policeman alledgedly told him that if he didn't slow down he'd probably kill someone tonight, after which Harris alledgedly replied "I kill thousands of people every night" and drove off........

He wasn't known for witty repartee.........

Edited By Percy Verance on 26/03/2018 08:32:48

Peter Miller26/03/2018 08:35:48
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Actually based on the accuracy of the bombing I think Bomber Harris would have been quite pleased if a 1 Km tape would be long enough. I believe that five miles was the average error.

Denis Watkins26/03/2018 08:35:52
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Posted by Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator on 25/03/2018 23:04:06:

Oh well, this thread title should get the secret squirrels' attention!

BEB

Sadly, in these troubled times, those in this business of protection have free access to phone calls, emails and online commentary, with any mention of ordinance. It is sad

Percy Verance26/03/2018 08:55:21
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Peter

At one point I think Bomber Harris was concerned enough regarding the accuracy - or not - of bombing to liken the effort to a cow being milked. His view was that we successfully kept kicking the bucket over, but we really needed to kill the cow........

Edited By Percy Verance on 26/03/2018 08:56:05

Percy Verance26/03/2018 09:05:53
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Anyway, reverting to the OP. With the new regs we're currently looking at, perhaps right now may not be the best time to compromise on any aspect of safety?

Just a thought.........

The Wright Stuff26/03/2018 09:46:01
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Posted by Percy Verance on 26/03/2018 09:05:53:

Anyway, reverting to the OP. With the new regs we're currently looking at, perhaps right now may not be the best time to compromise on any aspect of safety?

Just a thought.........

I would have thought there is a strong case for doing everything that we would want to do in the future, and doing it safely, demonstrably safely, and with great precision.The bigger picture is that if this sort of activity actually improves the ability of the pilot, then there is a lower future chance of an accident.

..and yes, the chuck glider incident happened. We all know it happened. I don't see the relevance of citing it every single time a safety issue is raised. It was a significant and news worthy story BECAUSE it was unlikely, not in spite of it!!!

Edited By The Wright Stuff on 26/03/2018 09:46:35

Piers Bowlan26/03/2018 10:17:00
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Thanks for sharing the video Cliff, looks like fun. What motor and LiPo are you using in your Super Sixty by the way? I must get my Ben Buckle kit out and do some building, now that I have finished putting in the new bathroom in my daughter's flat! angel

Edited By Piers Bowlan on 26/03/2018 10:17:38

Andy Meade26/03/2018 11:15:57
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Posted by Peter Miller on 26/03/2018 08:35:48:

Actually based on the accuracy of the bombing I think Bomber Harris would have been quite pleased if a 1 Km tape would be long enough. I believe that five miles was the average error.

That's more like USAF accuracy (even in daylight). Our boys, especially nearer the end, could drop loads within a few hundred yards once marked up nicely by PFF. And that was in the dark.

We run a bomb drop comp at PSSA events - always great fun yes

Percy Verance26/03/2018 13:45:50
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Then we'll simply have to agree to disagree.

We owe it to ourselves now more than ever to be careful and prudent. I'm sure you've probably heard the stories regarding model crash photos being uploaded from model flying forums and the like by people whom may seek to restrict our activites if they can by using the photos in a *this crashed right next to me* angle.

And of course there's the slope soaring club who lost their site because of a noise complaint....

With respect, models dropping items wouldn't be acceptable where I fly. I rather fear it may just take a casual observer to think the model was falling apart in flight......

You'll disagree of course, but that's my take on it.

J D 826/03/2018 13:57:44
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From 1943 onward 617 Squadron were equipped with the SABS "stabilized automatic bomb sight" and with practice could regulary put their bombs with in a hundred yard circle from 16 000 feet.

This was needed so as not to waste their expensive and hard to make Tallboy and Grandslam earthquake bombs.

The SABS may have been gyro stabilized and automatic but needed great skill to set up and also accurate flying hight and speed on a ten mile run in to target. Not nice when being shot at.

To limit time over the target aircraft would circle like Indians around a wagon train before heading in at the same time at different hight's all crossing the target within a few minutes. The mind boggles at timing it so as all aircraft and bombs miss each other !

The only other types of bomb to match or improve this level of accuracy were the German Frits X and American Azon bombs,both steered to target by an operator in the aircraft which had its own problems.

Accuracy only improved many years later with the introduction of Paveway laser guided types.

I also bomb drop from my DB Major Mannock, wIth two bombs that can be independently dropped.The target is usually myself and am lucky to get within 20yds from about 100ft.

John Stainforth26/03/2018 14:02:33
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I think dropping things from model planes is a very dodgy activity, particularly now that unmanned aircraft are coming under such scrutiny. The BMFA says "[nothing] should be dropped from a small unmanned aircraft so as to endanger persons or property". It might be fun, but the trouble is it can go wrong. I saw it go wrong once at a model a club in the US, where a water bomb was accidentally released too early from about 300 feet . It scored a direct vertical hit on a steel roof near the club hut, causing an enormous dent about six inches deep - it nearly went through. I suspect the terminal velocity was about 200 mph! If this had hit someone, it would have killed them.

The Wright Stuff26/03/2018 14:03:48
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Posted by Percy Verance on 26/03/2018 13:45:50:

Then we'll simply have to agree to disagree.

We owe it to ourselves now more than ever to be careful and prudent. I'm sure you've probably heard the stories regarding model crash photos being uploaded from model flying forums and the like by people whom may seek to restrict our activites if they can by using the photos in a *this crashed right next to me* angle.

And of course there's the slope soaring club who lost their site because of a noise complaint....

With respect, models dropping items wouldn't be acceptable where I fly. I rather fear it may just take a casual observer to think the model was falling apart in flight......

You'll disagree of course, but that's my take on it.

Percy, I don't think I actually fundamentally disagree with you that bomb (or anything else) dropping has the potential to be dangerous, and has the potential to infringe insurance, and has the potential to be misinterpreted by passers-by.

But as far as I can see, it's down to individual risk assessments at individual sites, and clearly the act of doing it at a public event is another matter entirely. It has been endorsed by this very magazine via the bomb drop workshop feature last month, and properly managed, policied, and risk-assessed, I don't see it as being any more dangerous than many other aspects of model flying.

My concern is that we are better showing the world that whenever it happens, it happens safely, than having one set of modellers denouncing another.

So I suppose at that point I do disagree with you. But then, at least we agree on that!

Alan Gorham_26/03/2018 14:11:12
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If you take the view expressed by some on this thread that dropping a lightweight bomb from a model has the potential to harm a human, then how on earth can you condone putting a heavy, high energy thing such as a model aircraft in the air in the first place?

As said above, there's a safe time, place and way to drop a bomb from a model and if chosen correctly it is perfectly safe.

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