By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by CML

My Anti Spark 150 connector not doing its job?

Or is it?

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Adrian Smith 114/04/2018 17:31:32
avatar
2317 forum posts
1102 photos

On a new aircraft (60cc equivalent electrification) I fitted an AS150 7mm connector for anti spark purposes.

Since the beginning there has been a hefty spark produced with in the connector shroud each of the 3 times I have used it. The wiring is 10AWG with a 12S setup using 2 x 5000 mAh lipos.

Now I see a marked build up of carbon like so:-

fullsizeoutput_b01.jpegThis doesn't seem right and wondered why this is. Any thoughts, thanks?

Edited By Adrian Smith 1 on 14/04/2018 17:31:58

Chris Bott - Moderator14/04/2018 17:45:41
avatar
Moderator
6703 forum posts
1392 photos
1 articles
That doesn't look like it's doing its job, Adrian.

All of these work using a 2 stage connection. When the tip connects there's a resistor in circuit which slows the charging of the ESC capacitors. Once charged, the plug is pushed home to make the proper connection.
Do the instructions suggest a small waiting period to allow the capacitors to charge?
Adrian Smith 114/04/2018 18:32:15
avatar
2317 forum posts
1102 photos

I am using these:-

**LINK**

I am wondering if the "resistance" , as mentioned in the ad. on the male red connector is faulty. I will check tomorrow. There is noting else in the. instructions about mode of connection or any added capacitor.

bert baker14/04/2018 18:41:08
avatar
1502 forum posts
306 photos

Have you tried connecting the red first then the black

Mark Elen14/04/2018 19:18:10
401 forum posts
738 photos

That doesn't look right Adrian. I have got the same connectors on the build I have going at the moment and when I tested them (8S 4000maH) there was little spark at all. The resistor is surely across the Red positive between the tip and the main body, connecting the red first will negate the resistor completely??

Cheers

Mark

BackinBlack14/04/2018 19:35:28
103 forum posts
1 photos

Perhaps when making them up the resistor tipped connector was soldered to the black cable. The resistor tipped bullet connector and the non resistor one look to be interchangeable.

Just a thought

Ian

Adrian Smith 114/04/2018 19:58:46
avatar
2317 forum posts
1102 photos

I will try that, Bert. Thanks.

You may be right there, Ian. I will check in the workshop tomorrow as all my kit is off home premises. Thanks for the ideas.

Edited By Adrian Smith 1 on 14/04/2018 19:59:09

Mark Elen14/04/2018 20:00:56
401 forum posts
738 photos

I never thought about that possibility Ian.

Cheers

Mark

BackinBlack14/04/2018 20:24:51
103 forum posts
1 photos

Easy to check, just connect the Red lead first. If it doesn't spark you have the answer.

Ian

Adrian Smith 115/04/2018 13:26:49
avatar
2317 forum posts
1102 photos

Well here we have it. I showed myself to be a numb skull!

Looking at the positive connector, it is without resistance.

fullsizeoutput_b05.jpegSorry the piccy is a bit blurred because my auto camera setting decided it wanted to focus on something else entirely!

And the negative connection is, you guessed it the one with resistance on it.

fullsizeoutput_b03.jpegQuestion is do I need to re-solder the resistance connector on to the +ve lead or as has been suggested connect to black (- ve) plug last? Am i likely to do any damage doing it that way? I was under the impression the + ve lead should be connected last.

G194015/04/2018 14:38:58
3523 forum posts
1 photos

It makes no difference which lead is connected first, except, of course when using anti-spark connectors. You're just completing a circuit which doesn't 'know' where the break was before completion.

Geoff

Adrian Smith 115/04/2018 15:16:14
avatar
2317 forum posts
1102 photos

Good to know, Geoff. Thanks for your input.

G194015/04/2018 16:46:45
3523 forum posts
1 photos

You're welcome. I only have one model with big batteries (6S, 4mm bullets) and I noticed a spark when I connected it yesterday. I've only flown it 3 times so far but it occurred to me that I should fit an anti-spark device.

Geoff

BackinBlack15/04/2018 16:54:10
103 forum posts
1 photos

Nice to know the mystery is solved. As Geoff says it doesn't matter about connecting positive lead first (in this case).

Happy Flying

Ian

Dickw16/04/2018 10:43:40
avatar
526 forum posts
77 photos
Posted by Geoff Sleath on 15/04/2018 16:46:45:

You're welcome. I only have one model with big batteries (6S, 4mm bullets) and I noticed a spark when I connected it yesterday. I've only flown it 3 times so far but it occurred to me that I should fit an anti-spark device.

Geoff

Nah – the spark lets you know the capacitors are still working and makes people around you jump (at least it does on my 10s setups) – got to get some fun out of it devil.

Dick

G194016/04/2018 11:30:07
3523 forum posts
1 photos

Sparks don't worry me, too much. After all I used to check the eht (extra high voltage) on TV cathode ray tubes (7kv and up) by drawing a spark with my screw driver and estimating the voltage by the length. It also generated a lovely ozone smell I'm more concerned about damaging the connector and ultimately the model I've spent a good few hours building.

Geoff

Adrian Smith 117/04/2018 09:15:38
avatar
2317 forum posts
1102 photos

Having flown yesterday, I did as suggested here and no spark to report. Thanks.

Barryorbik17/04/2018 15:57:25
avatar
117 forum posts
3 photos

Good job you only did that on the black and white TV's Geoff,as the colour TV CRT's used three guns and had 25kV DC on their final anode. Never risked it myself but apparently there was sufficient energy available there to kill a fully grown bull !!

Barry - retired but still alive TV engineer!

bert baker17/04/2018 16:04:31
avatar
1502 forum posts
306 photos

The idea of connecting possitve first is that the item it's powering should consume the surge and reduce arcing

G194017/04/2018 16:27:54
3523 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by Barryorbik on 17/04/2018 15:57:25:

Good job you only did that on the black and white TV's Geoff,as the colour TV CRT's used three guns and had 25kV DC on their final anode. Never risked it myself but apparently there was sufficient energy available there to kill a fully grown bull !!

Barry - retired but still alive TV engineer!

Yes, it was in the 1950s when I worked in the service department of Murphy Radio in WGC and later at the family TV shop. Although the source impedance was very high for line output generated EHT and I'm told you'd hardly feel it if you took firm hold but I never risked that. An early Murphy TV had a mains transformer generated EHT which really was lethal but by the time I was repairing TVs we only had one customer using one - no-one would touch it

I've neither owned nor repaired a TV since 1964.

Geoff

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of RCM&E? Use our magazine locator link to find your nearest stockist!

Find RCM&E! 

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
CML
Gliders Distribution
Wings & Wheels 2019
Pepe Aircraft
electricwingman 2017
Cambridge Gliding Club
Slec
Sarik
Advertise With Us
Latest "For Sale" Ads
Do you use a throttle kill switch?
Q: This refers to electric-powered models but do you use a throttle kill switch?

 Yes
 No
 Sometimes
 Rarely

Latest Reviews
Digital Back Issues

RCM&E Digital Back Issues

Contact us

Contact us