By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by CML

Flying a Turbine

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Percy Verance12/05/2018 13:58:48
avatar
7071 forum posts
141 photos

They're not rules Chris, they're recommendations. The BMFA are not a legislative organisation. They can only make recommendations, not rules.

And to correct an error I made earlier, taking a "B" test would require two Club Examiners, although I think I'm right in saying a Chief Examiner can take a "B" on his own.

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 12/05/2018 14:21:58

Engine Doctor12/05/2018 15:33:19
avatar
2055 forum posts
20 photos

Yes a Chief examiner can conduct a B on his own. We have had a similar situation where two members from our club took their B test with our club examiners only to be told by another club they belonged to that " it didn't count" . Even the BMFA said it was up to them whether or not they accepted the qualification ?

Percy Verance12/05/2018 15:58:41
avatar
7071 forum posts
141 photos

On that basis, one wonders how you'd stand if you took flying lessons and an "A" or "B" test at one of the places which advertise such services?

Oddly, if or when you fly at a display or competition, the organisers seem happy enough with a BMFA/LMA accreditation. It makes you wonder who they think they are to refuse to accept it?

Cuban812/05/2018 18:42:36
2169 forum posts
5 photos
Posted by Engine Doctor on 12/05/2018 15:33:19:

Yes a Chief examiner can conduct a B on his own. We have had a similar situation where two members from our club took their B test with our club examiners only to be told by another club they belonged to that " it didn't count" . Even the BMFA said it was up to them whether or not they accepted the qualification ?

On what basis would a club refuse to accept any A/S qualification? I'd love to hear their justification in refusing to accept the validity of a BMFA member's A/B/C or whatever, given that the member has satisified all the requirements of the achievement scheme test and with a BMFA registered examiner. Would there be the same reluctance if the member was passed by an ACE?

It's this sort of club political junk that we just don't need.

Don Fry12/05/2018 19:29:23
avatar
2794 forum posts
35 photos

I refer you to John Stones posts. A club can do as it wishes. Whether it a safety, or dinosaur related behaviour is irrelevant.

john stones 112/05/2018 20:02:40
avatar
9986 forum posts
1472 photos
Posted by Ultymate on 12/05/2018 09:57:45:

Yep I'm of same opinion, judge the pilot before any restrictions get put on, large petrols, large scale tricky to fly stuff, small quickies that go like a bat out of hell etc etc. Some B flyers about, you wouldn't like to be near on a field.

In this case you must surely worry about the veracity of the examiners that gave the flyers their "B" certificates in the first place

Edited By Ultymate on 12/05/2018 09:59:54

I have seen some dreadful B flyers Brian, so have many others, I've flown with some lads who have an A and some who have nothing and I would fly anywhere and anytime with them.

john stones 113/05/2018 00:05:23
avatar
9986 forum posts
1472 photos
Posted by Cuban8 on 12/05/2018 18:42:36:
Posted by Engine Doctor on 12/05/2018 15:33:19:

Yes a Chief examiner can conduct a B on his own. We have had a similar situation where two members from our club took their B test with our club examiners only to be told by another club they belonged to that " it didn't count" . Even the BMFA said it was up to them whether or not they accepted the qualification ?

On what basis would a club refuse to accept any A/S qualification? I'd love to hear their justification in refusing to accept the validity of a BMFA member's A/B/C or whatever, given that the member has satisified all the requirements of the achievement scheme test and with a BMFA registered examiner. Would there be the same reluctance if the member was passed by an ACE?

It's this sort of club political junk that we just don't need.

Nothing at all to do with a club refusing to accept a AS scheme qualification, the scenarios are many, took his her B with a model just over weight limit that tootles about, then goes n buys a turbine, would you just blindly say o.k you're free to fly it, or look further if they're safe to do so ? if you did say o.k go fly you have a B, it goes pear shaped, insurance claim, person or property got injured, someones messed up who do you blame ? BMFA for recommending a B to fly turbines, or the club for not political junking on the grounds of safety first ?

Old fella has a B, he sees younger lads flying their big petrols, you know his eyes/reactions ain't what they used to be, but he's a nice fella, popular at the club, and he really wants one, last thing you want to do is hurt his feelings, what do you do ? Happened a few times at our club, pilot has accepted help from the younger pilots who've stood with them, not been stopped flying has he ? common sense has been applied though, I reckon the BMFA would agree.

Percy Verance13/05/2018 07:03:47
avatar
7071 forum posts
141 photos

I guess it's also about knowing your own limits and capabilities too John, although there may be issues there with some folk!

Ultimately though common sense surely has to prevail. Safety cannot be an option. Even if it might mean upsetting/offending someone from time to time........

Now more than ever we must make every effort to present the right image of our hobby/sport.

 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 13/05/2018 07:07:46

Dave Cooper 329/10/2018 19:56:56
51 forum posts

I wonder if a possible approach for clubs would be to operate a 'risk-assessment /planned progression' approach :-

1. A new member wanting to fly turbines would first have to demonstrate safe, competent flying on a fast(ish) EDF model. Either their own, or, possibly owned and operated by the club.

Main benefit - no (or little) fire risk. Failsafe(s), installation checks etc to be regularly carried out by a competent club examiner. 'B' cert to be encouraged, but, let 'A' cert's progress to this on EDF first.

2. Existing members will be known to others. If they are 'top-notch' fliers then let them go the turbine route if they want to but with compulsory technical checks as above. If they refuse - what are they hiding ? 'Progressing' members - EDF first.

It only needs one bad accident to lose a site (or, heaven forbid, a life)....

My own planned progression here for your comments :-

Year 1 Airfix kit /scale drawings of a jet provost

Year 2 PSS model jet slope soarer

Year 3 EDF Jet Provost or similar 'straight-wing' jet

Year 4 Professional turbine flying lessons / Jet build

Year 5 Maiden jet with professional / v.experienced club member on buddy box

Overkill ?

Dave

Dave Wilshere08/11/2018 22:09:31
48 forum posts

Our club operates an A cert minimum to fly a turbine-with a spotter/helper who is B cert and Jet approved.

Even a B cert (C cert) is not enough to have you signed off to fly turbine models-you still must have a spotter, but once you are signed off the spotter does not have to be a B+or jet approved.

The logic is someone who has a cert and jet experience still might struggle to fly in our safe airspace. People come from huge open spaces or airfield operation and they need to prove they are spatially aware enough to operate a turbine model at our site.

The JMA do operate a B only rule, mainly because we operate more than one model in the air and the meetings are too busy to allow for people who might not have the required skill or safety knowledge.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of RCM&E? Use our magazine locator link to find your nearest stockist!

Find RCM&E! 

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Expo Tools 14 July
Airtek Hobbies
Wings & Wheels 2018
Slec
Gliders Distribution
CML
Overlander
Motion RC
electricwingman 2017
Advertise With Us
Sarik
Latest "For Sale" Ads
Which part of building a new traditional balsa aeroplane do you enjoy the most?
Q: Which part of building a new traditional balsa aeroplane do you enjoy the most?

 Research & choosing the model
 Building the fuselage
 Installing the engine and radio systems
 Building the flying surfaces
 Covering/painting/finishing
 All of it!
 None of it. I'd rather someone else did it!
 Other

Latest Reviews
Digital Back Issues

RCM&E Digital Back Issues

Contact us

Contact us