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Tx modes

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fly boy323/06/2018 20:12:43
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3207 forum posts
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Hi, can any please access for me the last poll on what tranny modes are used. Ie mode1' mode2 etc thanks. Tried search facility to no avail.

Tom Sharp 223/06/2018 20:23:06
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2953 forum posts
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The only mode is 1, it's written in the stars. cool

Denis Watkins23/06/2018 20:36:51
2812 forum posts
141 photos

**LINK**

There FB, and why ? This can of worms

https://www.modelflying.co.uk/forums/searchresults.asp?Search=Mode%20survey

Edited By Denis Watkins on 23/06/2018 20:47:21

Percy Verance23/06/2018 21:02:27
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6639 forum posts
113 photos

That certainly was pretty much the case when I moved from flying control line to radio Tom. There were very few non Mode 1 flyers where I was flying back then. Part of the reason for that was the fact that most - including me - were taught by the Club President, a former British Aerobatic Champion from the days of Phil Olsen, Stuart Uwins etc.....

I clearly recall him handing me his huge RCS transmitter, with the offer to fly a "few circuits"...........

Happy days........

fly boy323/06/2018 22:12:29
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3207 forum posts
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Hi Dennis, not interested in opening a can of worms lol. Our club has 99 per cent of mode 1. We have I would say perhaps 2 or 3 flyers on mode2. Lately we have had new members turning up with nearly every one with a mode2 Tx. This is unfortunate as the odds of a mode2 instructor being at the field at the same time as the learner is very small. This then turns out to be a disappointment on both sides. We are not fussed what mode any one uses. What could be the answer. ? Latest poll says 1 in 4 pilots use mode 1 Cheers

Percy Verance23/06/2018 22:38:00
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6639 forum posts
113 photos

It's odd that's a problem fly boy. I didn't think mode was an issue with most current sets along with cordless buddy systems?

My own system can certainly cope with a crossed mode scenario. In fact I own a transmitter on Mode 2, which is used specifically for teaching those whom do not use Mode 1 (my Mode).

Richard Ashworth23/06/2018 22:46:39
33 forum posts
6 photos

For Spektrum I believe you can "buddy link" mode 1 and 2 sets together to accommodate a pupil on mode 2 with a master mode 1, the "plane" being flown being bound to the master. The throttle stick on both tx's operate the same receiver channel.

A lot of the instructors where I fly are Spektrum mode 1 and link without problem to pupils either mode 1 or 2 sets.

If they want to fly training on the pupils plane it has to be rebound and set up on the instructors tx, then test flown etc. Time consuming but the pupil ends up with a sorted "safe" plane.

I don't know if this works on a buddy lead or if other manufacturers sets do the same?

john stones 123/06/2018 22:52:07
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9597 forum posts
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Just the faff of rebinding n setting instructor up as the master...been there done that.

Get some instructors trained up on proper mode. wink

Simon Chaddock23/06/2018 22:58:09
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5157 forum posts
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The Mode preference may have something to do with the how, and when!, you learned to fly.

In the early days of 2 channel Tx's and single axis sticks there was no real alternative but to end up with Mode 1.

In more recent times the 'joystick' generation and with even entry level Tx's of at least 6 channels Mode 2 is perhaps more obvious.

My first digital proportional RC set (1966!) was Mode ! but on my return to RC after a 20 year break and also having learned to fly full size Mode 2 seemed quite natural to me.

fly boy323/06/2018 23:24:32
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3207 forum posts
11 photos

With the buddy lead set up, do the transmitters have to be compatible ? Cheers

Percy Verance24/06/2018 07:34:43
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6639 forum posts
113 photos

It's maybe a bit unusual but I sometimes fly with a chap who uses Mode 4 - throttle/aileron on the left stick - and has done for the best part of 40 years. I'm not sure where he picked that up. Perhaps it's an evolution of Mode 2, or simply him preferring his ailerons on the left stick. He is right handed, although whether that has any bearing I have no idea.......He uses Multiplex gear, which can readily accommodate his mode, along with any other you might dream up.

He has the same controls on each stick as I do, but with the sticks the opposite way round. He also has a 3 position switch on top of one of the sticks, which I think he uses for flaps.

We did once have a chap fly with us who had all three flying controls on one stick - cuddle box - and the throttle on it's own slider. The radio was a Kraft set. Looked a little strange but it worked for him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 24/06/2018 07:56:06

Denis Watkins24/06/2018 08:52:50
2812 forum posts
141 photos
Posted by fly boy3 on 23/06/2018 22:12:29:

Hi Dennis, not interested in opening a can of worms lol. Our club has 99 per cent of mode 1. We have I would say perhaps 2 or 3 flyers on mode2. Lately we have had new members turning up with nearly every one with a mode2 Tx. This is unfortunate as the odds of a mode2 instructor being at the field at the same time as the learner is very small. This then turns out to be a disappointment on both sides. We are not fussed what mode any one uses. What could be the answer. ? Latest poll says 1 in 4 pilots use mode 1 Cheers

Exactly like my club FB, there are no mode 2 guys at all interested in giving aid.

We have 2 DX6i and RX, which buddy as Mode 1 Master, Mode 2 Slave

Max Z24/06/2018 09:13:53
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432 forum posts
197 photos
Posted by fly boy3 on 23/06/2018 23:24:32:

With the buddy lead set up, do the transmitters have to be compatible ? Cheers

Until recently, most sets had a PPM pulse input/output that you could use for cross-brand training purpose, all you had to do was buying or making a lead with two matching plugs for each system. Even my latest version of the Multiplex Royal, the SX, has the familiar DIN socket for that purpose, even though it is a fully digital 2.4 gHz transmitter and does not use the PPM signal internally.

There were some issues with signal strength (Futaba springs to mind) and reversed pulse polarity, but these could be resolved with simple adapters.

Nowadays, I am not so sure. I know that the latest MPX transmitters like the Cockpit SX and the ProfiTX are missing the familiar DIN socket, and I don't know if they have a replacement to allow a physical lead to be connected. I also know that they have an option for a wireless training link, named copilot. Other systems may have a similar provision, but these are most likely not compatible, since they use the brand specific transmission protocol.

Edited By Max Z on 24/06/2018 09:16:14

Percy Verance24/06/2018 09:37:28
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6639 forum posts
113 photos

No Max, the latest Mpx transmitters use the Co-Pilot module. As far as I'm aware there is no facility to plug in a physical lead. At least I don't see one on mine.The DIN socket was useful in that it had several functions, including simulator use, but again this is taken care of in the newer transmitters by Multiplex's own flight simulator (Multiflight), using a USB stick in your pc/laptop to which your tx is bound. The actual simulator software is a free download.

I particularly like the new Mpx Co-Pilot system, in that once you've transferred control to the student, you only need to move your own sticks to regain control. No switches etc. Nano seconds saved can sometimes mean the difference between a repair job or an intact model! 

We did once have a chap in our club whom used a 2.4gmhz module - Frsky I think - with his older 35mhz Mpx Cockpit. It worked just fine. But then he was a retired BAE Systems radar specialist so he ought to know what's what.

Denis.

I find myself wondering who taught your Mode 2 blokes to fly......?  They really ought to swallow their pride and offer some help. Now more than ever, the future of our hobby relies on new people coming into it......

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 24/06/2018 10:03:06

Geoff Sleath24/06/2018 11:32:07
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2668 forum posts
199 photos

My first club (RRMAC Hucknall) had a mixture of Mode 1 and Mode 2 flyers. I built my first 35 Mhz transmitter and just decided Mode 2 seemed the obvious way to go and it didn't hinder my learning to fly through a lack of potential instructors. However, when I retired properly, access to the airfield was difficult during the week so I joined the club at Ashbourne which was then (and mostly still is) a Mode 1 zone. Strangely, that proved to be a good thing because it forced me to test fly my own models. Anything tricky I had Ian Redshaw as a back up, which helps a lot.

There's always a bit of banter as to which is best but in reality it's what ever suits you. Both work perfectly well and presumably so do Modes 3 and 4. I once came across a pilot who used a reversed throttle control from the norm ie up was closed and down was open.

Geoff

KiwiKid24/06/2018 12:22:37
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402 forum posts
377 photos

I have been meaning to give that Mode 3 thing a try, but it looks a bit awkward.

mode3.jpg

And Mode 4 is nuts.

taranis upside down.jpg

Martin Harris24/06/2018 13:08:36
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7638 forum posts
190 photos

There are at least 6 modes available with "normal" transmitters if the manufacturer has made centring available for the vertical axes but none of them are the "right" mode. The only thing that can really be argued in absolute terms in the perennial silly argument between Modes 1 and 2 is that Mode 2 allows you to retain control over the primary flight axes while swatting flies or scratching your nose!

Percy Verance24/06/2018 17:47:20
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6639 forum posts
113 photos

My radio manufacturer supplies new radios with both sticks spring centred with no mode selected - apart from the most basic set they do. The end user selects the mode/ control configuration he/she needs.... Any axis can have spring centreing, ratchet or smooth friction. Take your pick.

Not quite sure what you meant when you say none of them are the *right* mode? What is?

Which mode is *best* is an utterly pointless argument. Whatever works for you is the best mode. We've seen World Champion Aerobatic flyers using both Modes 1 and 2.......

 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 24/06/2018 17:53:34

Martin Harris24/06/2018 18:36:47
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7638 forum posts
190 photos
Posted by Percy Verance on 24/06/2018 17:47:20:

Not quite sure what you meant when you say none of them are the *right* mode? What is?

The answer is right there Percy. There is no right mode, just use whichever mode you like best.

Tom Sharp 224/06/2018 19:39:29
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2953 forum posts
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I have several cheapy TX's which come with Quads etc that have the facility to switch from Mode One to Mode Two with just the flick of a switch. One, 'UDI' brand, you can select all four modes.

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