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john stones 117/08/2018 17:58:07
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9975 forum posts
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I reckon mankind is a lost cause, the planet and almost everything else on it would be better if we'd never evolved. Really big issues all over the world and our own greed never stops. Reign the big economies in and the big companies ? Good luck with that, you seen the caliber of leadership we have.

Watched a program last night saying 7 million Sharks are caught unintentionally each year and die, all caught on lines with hooks aimed at other species of fish, they were testing methods of deterring Sharks from these hooks, chemicals (dead Shark cells) and hooks that gave electric fields out, both seemed to work.

On a more positive note, I grew up in South Yorkshire, smog was regular thing, rivers devoid of fish, farmers spraying DDT, airs much cleaner now, rivers are stuffed with fish, farmers may have improved but tell the Bees that ?

David Mellor17/08/2018 19:00:37
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John, chin up, mate.

The darkest hour is just before dawn. As others have said, the tide against plastic packaging is very slowly showing tiny signs of turning.

One day our descendants will laugh about how foolish it was to have wrapped products up in plastic.

 

Since this thread began I have - very politely and diplomatically - contacted HobbyKing and drawn their attention to their plastic packaging and drawn their attention to this thread.

They have - equally politely and very promptly - replied and have promised to consider the issue of using plastic packaging within their Logistics Team.  They said that in recent time they have already taken some steps to minimise materials they send out as part of their packaging processes.

In a subsequent e-mail I requested one other thing of Hobbyking - namely that they pass the correspondence upwards to the directors for information (that some customers would like to see an end to plastic packaging).

They seem like a decent company.............

Edited By David Mellor on 17/08/2018 19:02:51

Denis Watkins17/08/2018 19:17:18
3120 forum posts
144 photos
Posted by David Mellor on 17/08/2018 19:00:37:

One day our descendants will laugh about how foolish it was to have wrapped products up in plastic.

I believe they will laugh too at the number of wheelie bins we use.

The whole Borough where I live has

4 different coloured wheelie bins outside every house.

I am not a visionary, and can provide no alternative, but must report 4 wheelie bins per house?

David Mellor17/08/2018 19:43:14
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1083 forum posts
498 photos

40 years ago we holidayed in Malta.

One day was bin day and we had instructions to put our waste in the little black bin and put it out for collection.

The bin was tiny - not much bigger than a cinema popcorn bucket. Looking along the street even families of 6 or 7 had just one tiny bin. All glass bottles and jars were returned to the shop from whence they came.

At the time I made the grave error of regarding their efforts as rather primitive........ I regret that now.

Now I realise it is us that are primitive by generating phenomenal quantities of long-lived rubbish that turns up everywhere on the planet - no corner on earth is free from plastic junk blown in on the breeze, thrown up by the tide or carried down by the river.

onetenor18/08/2018 00:20:18
1809 forum posts

In the Pacific there is a huge sort of gyre or whirlpool full of waterlogged plastic floating around. It would take a huge fleet of "SCOOPER" ships to gather it all Do you think it will ever happen? I don't think it will ever happen at least in my life time what's left of it. So it will be left to bio degrade and pollute forever. It sickens me to think of it.

Piers Bowlan18/08/2018 07:35:28
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1462 forum posts
41 photos

I have to echo Davids praise for HK, having placed so many orders over the years.

I purchased a BL motor from a UK supplier some years ago. It arrived with a bent motor shaft, it was rattling around in its cardboard box with a small crumpled piece of newspaper for company which did little to protect it. Incidentally, nothing would have prepared be from the rebuke I received from the supplier when I contacted them who accused me of returning a motor that I had damaged. I didn't give them any further orders and they are no longer trading. I bought a kit from a highly respected UK company. The kit arrived but it's flimsy box was broken in two, fortunately the beautifully crafted CNC balsa inside was undamaged. I think the balsa and brown paper wrapping was holding the box together! I contacted the supplier and I suggested that I would be happy to pay more for better packaging in future but my suggestion was dismissed (not invented here syndrome!)

The moral here is that packaging, like everything else, needs to be fit for purpose. Personally, I think that HK usually get this balance right but maybe not in the case of the OP.

Rich too18/08/2018 08:35:57
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2832 forum posts
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Posted by David Mellor on 17/08/2018 09:09:23:

I think that what this thread illustrates so far is that most of us think that waste (in all its various forms) is being adequately dealt with.

Far from it. Someone mentioned big companies and greed yes everything is driven by profits, and that’s why nothing (on a big enough scale) is being done. And the global economy doesn’t help...

Cuban818/08/2018 09:42:56
2154 forum posts
5 photos

As SVAS family members, we were informed that our quarterly journal 'Propswing' would now be posted in polywrap rather than the old style paper envelope. I couldn't believe the backwards step and put a comment on their Facebook page.

 

Edited By Cuban8 on 18/08/2018 09:43:38

David Mellor18/08/2018 10:23:08
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1083 forum posts
498 photos

If you drink bottled water, you are ingesting particles of plastic that someone somewhere has dumped.....

**LINK**

And this is why:-

**LINK**

So the photograph of the plastic packaging in post 1 of the thread looks innocuous, and once we chuck it in the bin we happily forget about it. But.... it has unfortunate ways of finding its way back to us and future generations.

David Mellor18/08/2018 11:28:34
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1083 forum posts
498 photos

This will help a bit:-

**LINK**

Just to be absolutely clear that this is 100% on topic for this thread - the HobbyKing plastic packaging in the photograph in post 1 is single use plastic.

I love Hobbyking - they're great.

But they need to drop single use plastic packaging.

Geoff Sleath18/08/2018 11:56:14
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2920 forum posts
242 photos

We almost never drink bottled water. We have a filtered water option on out kitchen sink tap and use that for drinking (actually the water straight from the tap is OK but my wife says it makes her tea taste - I drink coffee). My wife carries a reusable bottle of water and, as cyclists, we use the normal bidons with water.

Never understood the passion for buying bottled water here. The only times we have were when cycle touring in places like Nepal where unboiled water can be a bit dodgy (in Nepal we used to drink some horrible orange flavoured juice to keep hydrated).

In Buxton spring water is freely available from a spigot on the street near the theatre. I've seen people filling bottles from it lots of times

Geoff

David Mellor18/08/2018 12:17:26
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1083 forum posts
498 photos

Pretty much all drinking water contains plastic microparticles.  

Much of the plastic falls as airborne fine dust carried by the wind and weather systems (the city of Paris has measured more than 3 tones of micro-plastic dust per year falling within its boundaries).  The plastic dust enters aquifers, rivers, lakes and reservoirs via ordinary surface run-off.

Unless the recharge time of your Buxton spring water aquifer is more than 50 years, then the chances are that it too carries micro plastic particles.

Basically the stuff is so widespread it is scientifically a surprise when it is not found in analyses, rather than when it is found.

**LINK**

 

 

Edited By David Mellor on 18/08/2018 12:32:28

john stones 118/08/2018 12:18:04
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9975 forum posts
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Why ???

Why would you buy bottled water, what's wrong with tap water, do we need adverts of sexy men/women beside kitchen sinks instead of cool mountain streams convincing us to stop ?

Ikura18/08/2018 14:11:15
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221 forum posts
Posted by john stones 1 on 18/08/2018 12:18:04:

Why would you buy bottled water, what's wrong with tap water, do we need adverts of sexy men/women beside kitchen sinks instead of cool mountain streams convincing us to stop ?

 

People buy bottled water because it's trendy, and marketed as far superior to tap water. The fact that a lot of plastic bottles end up in hedges, left on the beaches and parks doesn't bother some folk.

Bottled water has to be one of the most imaginative marketing con jobs ever. Unless you live in a disease ridden country with a foul water system it is utterly pointless and a complete waste of money.

 

Edited By Ikura on 18/08/2018 14:11:41

David Mellor18/08/2018 14:34:47
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1083 forum posts
498 photos

And recent analysis of hundreds of brands shows that the average micro-plastic particle content is approximately twice that of tap water.

Not only a brilliant marketing con job, but one that appears to also sell you more plastic particles per litre to drink than tap water!

**LINK**

supertigrefan18/08/2018 16:39:31
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357 forum posts
8 photos

As much as I am pretty much on your side of the fence regarding pollution and waste, linking all the research to the 'Guardian' doesn't really sell it to me personally.

David Mellor18/08/2018 17:15:51
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1083 forum posts
498 photos

Ignore what the Guardian says altogether.

Read the academic literature.  

 

You will have to pay a small sum to gain access to the current on-line academic journals, but it is a good investment if you want to read the peer-reviewed scientific source literature.

Some of the "higher level" review findings of some of the academic pare publicly available.

For example, "The Lancet" is globally respected as the world's leading independent peer reviewed medical journal.  It recently published a very readable overview of the health implications of micro-plastics.  

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanplh/article/PIIS2542-5196(17)30121-3/fulltext

 

Edited By David Mellor on 18/08/2018 17:52:22

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