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Danny Fenton03/11/2019 21:45:29
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9289 forum posts
4116 photos

I was thinking litho over a wire/carbon rod, ganged and attached to a servo

Danny Fenton03/11/2019 23:13:56
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9289 forum posts
4116 photos

Okay last one from me today.

8 small magnets fitted to retain the cowl. The pull is nice and strong so shouldn't come off

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Cheers

Danny

Colin Leighfield03/11/2019 23:15:07
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5965 forum posts
2494 photos

I’m watching. The undercarriage is a work of art. Because the Oleos are at an angle from the vertical, as they compress the distance between them at the axle end must reduce. Therefore the axle has to slide and in doing so increase the amount of its length outboard of the axle fittings, or the oleos have to pivot outwards to maintain the distance. The load through the oleos can’t be vertical. I would have thought that the friction in this would have been considerable and I’m surprised that the oleos compress at all. I would have thought that to work properly the axle should bend in the middle, perhaps with a universal joint. However you say that they do compress, so I must be wrong.

Danny Fenton03/11/2019 23:47:01
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9289 forum posts
4116 photos

Hi Colin, this was my big fear, and very early on Tony proved that it does work. The bits give enough. The front piano wire rotates in the clamp, as does the rear. The oleos do as you say splay outwards as they compress.

First trials with the oleos drilled at 19 degrees to allow the axle to pass through caused too much binding and though it worked, it didn't work well.

The new method uses the two steel plates silver soldered to the piano wire ends as the axle bearing, this is less critical to the axle angle causing things to bind.

It does indeed work. The cross bracing of the trailing arms has locked the side to side movement completely. First hard landing could have bits flying everywhere, so I will try to stick to soft landings

You are quite right Colin, it shouldn't work, but it does

Cheers

Danny

Edited By Danny Fenton on 03/11/2019 23:52:38

Martian04/11/2019 10:37:37
2255 forum posts
1091 photos

Danny you disappoint me your woodwork is immaculate your foam carving is faultless and to cap it all your wirework is amazing can't you at least do one thing that is not perfect I'm going in a corner to cry. Me i just want to cover my work so it can't be seen. 😎 ,great to have you back working at full steam

Martyn K04/11/2019 11:23:17
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5001 forum posts
3658 photos

I would be inclined to sand the vanes from spruce strip and just glue them into place. However, if you are planning on making them rotate then you really are a masochist.

laugh

Love the undercarriage though. Made me have a rethink...

Martyn

Martian04/11/2019 11:38:32
2255 forum posts
1091 photos

I just shaped strips of litho glued in place

Danny Fenton04/11/2019 14:35:39
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9289 forum posts
4116 photos

Hi Chaps, well that made me laugh, thanks Martian I always pick the best angles and try not to show the blunders. But if you were to look in the bin you will see there are a few iterations before I get it right

But for you I will try and take a pic of the next faux-par

I tried folding litho but that didn't quite work as planned, they are in the bin. Might try foil wrapped balsa next Spruce is too heavy Martyn No they wont be moving I was just teasing wink 2

Cheers

Danny

Martyn K04/11/2019 14:51:59
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5001 forum posts
3658 photos

That is more winks than is good for you wink 2

Danny Fenton04/11/2019 15:19:55
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9289 forum posts
4116 photos

smile o Ahhhhh wink 2

Martyn K04/11/2019 15:30:24
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5001 forum posts
3658 photos
Posted by Colin Leighfield on 03/11/2019 23:15:07:

Because the Oleos are at an angle from the vertical, as they compress the distance between them at the axle end must reduce. Therefore the axle has to slide and in doing so increase the amount of its length outboard of the axle fittings, or the oleos have to pivot outwards to maintain the distance.

Hi Colin

Not necessarily. Imagine the legs were vertical (parallel). If one leg compresses, then the distance between the axle holes will actually increase and at the other extreme, it the legs were splayed out at 180 degrees, 10mm compression would be a 10mm reduction in distance. There will be some point where the amount of compression will equal the distance the axle points move apart. I'll bet that the Fury undercarriage angle isn't far from that point. There will be a compromise where the distance between the axle holes initially gets longer then gets shorter again because the legs don't splay radially

Martyn

Danny Fenton04/11/2019 18:43:23
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9289 forum posts
4116 photos

Right I blame Martian, in all the years I have been using thin CA I have never had a bottle lid fly off and the contents go all over my hands, the worktop and the tools. I will be picking CA of my hands for days I reckon! One pair of scissors in the bin. Cutting board with scalpel still attached also in the bin! See I am just as flawed

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Anyway a couple of radiator gills made, I used balsa covered in foil in the end. Not a hundred percent happy. They look too fat to me. But when the glue went everywhere I thought it was time to give up for a while

Cheers

Danny

Jose L. G.04/11/2019 19:02:27
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182 forum posts
133 photos

Hi Danny.

Still around the fórum.

ou can clean the CA spillage with acetone. Not dispose of the scissors,....

Cheers,

José Luis

Foxfan04/11/2019 19:04:38
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848 forum posts
6 photos

Or scrape it off with a chisel or wash it off with hot, soapy water. Been there a few times, done that.

 

Martin

Edited By Foxfan on 04/11/2019 19:04:58

Fats Flyer04/11/2019 19:05:30
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477 forum posts
12 photos

That's Martian and fates way telling you to STICK at it Danny.

Martian05/11/2019 10:47:10
2255 forum posts
1091 photos

Oops but hey wait a minute where's the proof of this flaw is this just to make me feel better 👽

Danny Fenton05/11/2019 12:15:33
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9289 forum posts
4116 photos

Okay, here is the crusty scalpel handle after I prised it off the mat, that took a big screwdriver. This is after a good sloshing in acetone as well. Went back in the bin. I cannot have stuff on the handle, I am odd like that. I have others and its not worth the time.

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So silver soldering 101, I am sure you all know this but one or two are still asking

Okay I use the silver solder sold by Mick Reeves, different products work at different temperatures which is useful if you are making things like steam engines where one already made joint is close to another, but as I only make toy aeroplanes this is not an issue.

I like to clean the two parts, with emery cloth or something similar, silver soldering is not as critical to cleanliness as soft solder, but to be sure I still give it a clean.

The flux powder is mixed with a drop of water, you do not need much and don't over thin. (put one srop of water in a cap, and then a couple of scalpel blades of powder on that. If it evaporates to a crusty residue, add a drop of water and grind it back into a paste

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Position the work such that it wont easily move, I usually add some weight to hold it still. Apply the flux with something like a cocktail stick, make sure you coat the area along the joint. Silver solder will ONLY flow along the flux.

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Apply the blowlamp to the larger area first and within a couple of seconds stick the solder into the flame. A small section should melt off on to the joint area, keep the flame moving around on the joint. Just before it gets red hot the solder should "flow" that's it, job done. Let it cool gradually and give the finished job a quick clean and buff. It is much quicker and easier than soft soldering in my opinion, and so much stronger.

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You need a blow lamp capable of generating sufficient heat, I use the one in the pic, I think it was from B and Q.

The item above is an elevator joiner for My Fury.

It might be of interest but along with loads of great goodies Mick Reeves Models sell these steel rigging anchor plates. They are very useful if like me you hate cutting out bits of steel. I used them (or bits of them) for the undercarriage. Now you know what they are you will see these little plates appear all over the place

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I cut one a little short and made a new hole for a clevis in one end, and opened the other up to the size of the piano wire joiner.

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Cheers

Danny

Martin Fane05/11/2019 13:10:05
312 forum posts
319 photos

Hi Danny

Great progress by yourself. Thanks for all the insight and sharing your techniques.

Now its back to the building board / facsimile machine for me wink 2- time to try and catch up.

Me thinks Mr Reeves may have a rush on for silver soldering stuff !!

cheers

Martin

Manish Chandrayan05/11/2019 13:53:34
606 forum posts
70 photos

Another tip on silver soldered steel joints is to ensure that all flux residue is cleaned off.

Best way I have found is to soak the joint in solution of caustic soda. This will neutralize all acid and leave with salt and water which can be rinsed off with plain water. Parts dried and oiled up/painted to prevent rust build up.

Manish Chandrayan05/11/2019 13:53:36
606 forum posts
70 photos

Duplicate post, deleted!

Edited By Manish Chandrayan on 05/11/2019 13:54:46

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