By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by CML

When modelling money saving goes too far...

A light-hearted poke at the skinflints amongst us.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
The Wright Stuff02/10/2018 09:20:16
avatar
1394 forum posts
227 photos

I know we talk a lot about modelling money savers on here, and there's no doubt there are great ways to cut the costs of a build. But do you (or someone you know) occasionally go too far. Are you or they a skinflint, a miser, or just tight?

I had to chuckle to myself the other day. My father has always resisted the use of masking tape for painting models on principle - he much prefers to brush paint lines by eye.

For painting the waterlines on his model boats, I bought him some 'proper' Tamiya masking tape - no arguments, I told him, just try it.

A couple of weeks later, he was delighted with the results. It was a revelation to him. The tape applied easily around the compound curves, and there was no bleed whatsoever. Both of us happy, I thought no more about it.

Visiting at the weekend, I couldn't help but notice streamers of used masking tape dangling from the ceiling. "It's expensive stuff", he enthused, "you can dry it out and use it over and over again"...

Sigh!

Nigel R02/10/2018 09:36:04
avatar
4159 forum posts
698 photos

I'm not that bad, although I do have a large pile of tiny and probably useless bits of balsa, and a mostly worthless box full of almost certainly never-to-be-used-again exhaust parts from obsolete motors, some of which are even in one whole piece.

Mowerman02/10/2018 10:17:33
avatar
1561 forum posts
105 photos

I guess we all have balsa 'scrap' boxes thinking that bit is too big to bin but at what size do we draw the line. Same also applies to brushed motors, wheels,wire. tube, bits of covering film etc, etc .

Edited By Mowerman on 02/10/2018 10:19:06

ken anderson.02/10/2018 10:43:55
avatar
8766 forum posts
813 photos

I think that most R/C modellers are hoarders....more so the older lads(me) who come from the make and mend era......one of our lads had the chimney pots taken of his roof because he was given the smoke away for nothing...another has perfected peeling an orange in his pocket.... emotion scrooge come to mind...

ken anderson...ne..1..... thrift dept.

Former Member02/10/2018 11:35:55
3573 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

Jon - Laser Engines02/10/2018 12:04:55
5624 forum posts
271 photos

I have terrible trouble trying to convince customers their engines are dead, or at least are beyond economical repair.

Some will continue to flog the horse long after it has died and only once its bones are bleached, and 3 models have been lost due to its unreliability, do they finally admit defeat. Even at this point i still hear mutterings of 'i bought that in 1986 and its never let me down until now. Are you sure it cant be repaired?'

I would say that 32 years is a pretty good innings for any engine so its not like they didnt get their money's worth

Geoff S02/10/2018 12:17:36
3818 forum posts
49 photos
Posted by Jon - Laser Engines on 02/10/2018 12:04:55:

I have terrible trouble trying to convince customers their engines are dead, or at least are beyond economical repair.

Some will continue to flog the horse long after it has died and only once its bones are bleached, and 3 models have been lost due to its unreliability, do they finally admit defeat. Even at this point i still hear mutterings of 'i bought that in 1986 and its never let me down until now. Are you sure it cant be repaired?'

I would say that 32 years is a pretty good innings for any engine so its not like they didn't get their money's worth

In that case, Jon, I don't think it's being mean; it's sentimentality. He's being forced to say goodbye to an old, formerly reliable friend.

Me? I have a small cardboard box tucked under my bench full of pieces of wood 'too small to be of further use' Actually, of course, they aren't. I hate cutting into a virgin sheet of of either balsa or ply just to make one of the small parts all models need somewhere. So my box of 'too small to be of further use' wood effectively denies its name

Geoff

kc02/10/2018 12:43:28
6709 forum posts
173 photos

Nowadays all this is not mean it's recycling and it's Green!

David Davis02/10/2018 12:47:50
avatar
3851 forum posts
741 photos

All of this reminds me of an incident concerning my best friend. I'll give him a plug, his name is Marino Pacini and he is the proprietor of MBP Autos in Shrewsbury, quite a big service and repair garage which employs three mechanics while two other firms rent ramps from him. One of his customers was a mini cab driver whose Ford Escort had covered over 500,000 miles. The owner wanted him to put a new engine into it until Marino persuaded him to shoot it and buy something more modern!

As for me, I have a plastic bag full balsa off-cuts under the work bench. When I need a small piece for a gusset for example, I have a look in the bag before looking in the boxes of stock balsa. When the bag is full it's tipped into the wood-burning stove. Balsa is not much good as tinder but it burns eventually!

Waste not want not! I am from the make do and mend generation! smiley

Alistair Scolley02/10/2018 13:04:17
17 forum posts
1 photos

I recently lost a model when the engine cut unexpectedly when the plane was low, slow and going downwind. When I got the bits back I started taking the radio out, aiming to re-use whatever was working. Then I remembered that the engine servo had been in a previous crash ...

Just how long should we keep old servos, especially when we can't remember how many "hard landings" they've had?

Alistair

Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator02/10/2018 13:15:11
avatar
Moderator
15748 forum posts
1460 photos

I find this whole business very confusing!

You see I can identify wih the hoarding thing - we all do that. Yes I have my box of balsa and lite-ply bits - some of which are just about big enough to protect delecate surfaces on models from clamp pressure etc., many of which couldn't even do that!

But here's the bit I don't get. We'll go out and spend £400+ on a model, either ARTF or a kit. We'll buy a radio for £400, we'll buy a engine for £200, we'll buy batterries at £50+ a throw. But,...put the club fees up by a £1 (with detailled justification as to why) and we have a 3 hour heated debated! Very odd!

BEB

Jon - Laser Engines02/10/2018 13:42:30
5624 forum posts
271 photos
Posted by Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator on 02/10/2018 13:15:11:

I

But here's the bit I don't get. We'll go out and spend £400+ on a model, either ARTF or a kit. We'll buy a radio for £400, we'll buy a engine for £200, we'll buy batterries at £50+ a throw. But,...put the club fees up by a £1 (with detailled justification as to why) and we have a 3 hour heated debated! Very odd!

BEB

Aint that the truth.

Andy Meade02/10/2018 13:53:16
avatar
2786 forum posts
717 photos
Posted by David Davis on 02/10/2018 12:47:50:

...Balsa is not much good as tinder but it burns eventually!...

Crikey, your joking, surely? I've found balsa shavings and small offcuts the best thing for lighting the wood burner or bonfires...ever! It goes off like rocket fuel surprise

Peter Christy02/10/2018 14:06:33
1903 forum posts
Posted by Jon - Laser Engines on 02/10/2018 12:04:55:.......Even at this point i still hear mutterings of 'i bought that in 1986 and its never let me down until now. Are you sure it cant be repaired?'

 

What on earth are they doing to them to wear them out that quickly? As long as an engine is well maintained, and run on decent fuel, it will last pretty well forever!

My KingPin is currently being hauled around in grand style by a Webra 61 I bought in 1967 (or was it 1968? - either way, a long time ago!). I have a box full of Cox .049s from the 60s in running order! Not to mention a few PAW diesels bought in the 70s.

Oh, yes, and I have a car that's 47 years old!

Tightwad? Me? Meh! cheeky

--

Pete

 

Edited By Peter Christy on 02/10/2018 14:07:37

Nigel R02/10/2018 14:08:09
avatar
4159 forum posts
698 photos

In general, people seem unwilling to pay for 'services' rather than physical goods.

Peter Miller02/10/2018 14:16:59
avatar
11474 forum posts
1365 photos
10 articles

A year or so ago a club member who didn't fly any longer for reasons of health gave me his big box of scrap balsa.

Most of it was more like pine, some was even marked with the Kiel Kraft logo or Solarbo.

I ocasionally search in it for some wood that I can use and keep meaning to go through it and save the stuff that I can use.

It is still waiting for that day.

Then I have one or two models that I will never fly again.....must strip them out and burn them

Former Member02/10/2018 14:30:45
8090 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

Shaunie02/10/2018 14:43:01
avatar
953 forum posts
78 photos
Posted by Nigel R on 02/10/2018 14:08:09:

In general, people seem unwilling to pay for 'services' rather than physical goods.

Too true! I do electrical and diagnostic work on cars. Customers appear happy to have given the previous garage hundreds of pounds for parts that haven't fixed the fault, yet whinge like mad when I give them a bill for a few hours labour that has their car running properly again.
As for hoarding, I'm one of the worst, I even keep sloppy servos for spares etc. It might work out though, I'm just about to make an animated zombie head for Halloween,some of the rubbish servos can go in there and keep the decent ones for flight.

Cuban802/10/2018 15:55:44
3051 forum posts
1 photos

Not a very palatable thought, but all that 'useful' stuff that you're hoarding for a special job or 'just in case' will never get used and will eventually find its way into the skip on your demise. Get rid of it now, create some space and save someone a lot of bother in the future - I only say this because a few of my club mates have had the sad task of clearing a modellers workshop recently, and although a good few bits were valuable and could be sold, 90% hadn't been touched for years, was of no earthly use and was dumped.

Re the subs - I have a feeling that the BMFA increase will be the full four quid, so expect some fun this year.

Edited By Cuban8 on 02/10/2018 15:59:50

Geoff S02/10/2018 16:12:02
3818 forum posts
49 photos

Too, true, Cuban.

When we had the shop (and lived there) we had an enormous workshop and it was hard to find a place to work because of 'stuff'. One of my earliest memories (mid 1940s) was being given an old (pre-war) radio to strip down and save the parts. Almost nothing was scrapped completely. That was useful when as a schoolboy I started building 1 valve radios for myself.

When Dad reluctantly retired he bought a bungalow and filled the back garden with a site hut with all amenities (including water, drains and gas). Never the less we spent weeks emptying the old workshop and carting it down to the tip. I remember putting stuff he wanted onto shelves in his new workshop and thinking that the next time this is touched is when he dies and I'm throwing it away ... and so it panned out. Dad, like my grandfather was into clocks so at least a lot of his hoard was sold at auction by the British Horological Society and my step-mother got a few thousand for her own retirement.

Dad was world class hoarder - I'm merely 3rd division

Geoff

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Sussex Model Centre
electricwingman 2017
Slec
CML
Sarik
Advertise With Us
Latest "For Sale" Ads
NEW POLL - has the pandemic altered your event safety perceptions?
Q: Has the covid pandemic deterred you from attending shows and events in 2021?

 No, I'll be attending just as many as I usually do
 No, but I'll choose my event with greater care
 Yes, I'll attend fewer events going forward
 Yes, I wont attend any where previously I have

Latest Reviews
Digital Back Issues

RCM&E Digital Back Issues

Contact us

Contact us

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of RCM&E? Use our magazine locator link to find your nearest stockist!

Find RCM&E!