By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by CML

Foamies for beginners?

A discussion.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Mike Etheridge 108/11/2018 16:18:20
1458 forum posts
400 photos

I would recommend the foam Twinstar 2 as a good plane to learn on. Mine has flown for 12 years with NI MH batteries that weigh 1lb 2 ounces each so the plane does penetrate in relatively high winds, so gets used as a hack most times I go flying. It's made of EP foam so is fairly crash resistant. The newer Twinstar 2 has brush less motors and tends to be used with LI PO batteries so I am not sure how well it penetrates ?. Of course the plane is not supplied with an undercarriage so without one it is no good for the A-test.

20-05-2007 uproar barton point 002.jpg

Dave Hess09/11/2018 01:57:34
224 forum posts
17 photos

This thread just fills me with despair. This is what it could be like. Note that they're more or less all made of foam:

Edited By Dave Hess on 09/11/2018 02:01:09

Nigel R09/11/2018 09:55:00
avatar
1854 forum posts
357 photos

Mass combat event, looks relevant in a thread talking about beginner planes, or not, am I missing something?

Dave Hess09/11/2018 10:30:39
224 forum posts
17 photos
Posted by Nigel R on 09/11/2018 09:55:00:

Mass combat event, looks relevant in a thread talking about beginner planes, or not, am I missing something?

Of course you're missing something. That's the whole point of why I wrote it. The larger proportion of those guys flying in that video are beginners. They're flying cheap, easy to make planes mostly made of foam board. Their planes fly pretty well, in fact in the 40 years I've been building and flying, I can say that the Flitetest planes fly as well as anything, if not better.. What you see in the video, though not obvious, is loads of people having accessible fun. If you look at the Flitetest forum, you'll see new members joining every day. How many new members do we get here?

That event wasn't a national combat event. Instead, it was an event organised to get as many new flyers as possible to join in a fun day (or three) building and flying planes. The emphasis is on participation and fun. As you can see, the event was successful. Originally, they only had one event per year. Now they have several. I came back to the hobby after a bit of a break. In the UK I don’t see any events that weren't around in the 80s except maybe Indoor 3D, which might owe it's existance to foam planes.

Ikura09/11/2018 11:11:10
avatar
226 forum posts

I think you are missing something Dave.

What works in America doesn't often work here. The Bristish are more reserved and prefer to do things in a more careful and controlled manner with individual tuition, hopefully leading them to gain an A certificate.

Mass foam board toy launches are fine if that is your thing. The OP was stating that lightweight foam beginners models are probably not the best place to start, and you propose that lightweight foam board models are a great place to start?

Nigel R09/11/2018 11:32:09
avatar
1854 forum posts
357 photos

"The Bristish..."

...to be found near Bristol? smiley

Bob Cotsford09/11/2018 11:47:25
avatar
7514 forum posts
426 photos

I think that if you are 20 or 30 something and not constrained by a club with a formal training regime then the Flitetest type foamies would be a fun way to learn. Unfortunately as we get older we seem to put more value on 'things' 'structure' and 'risk' and less on fun. Or maybe we just have less energy to burn off. Anyway, at the clubs I've been in most of our novices are older gents and a Flitetest mass build and launch would result in multiple medical or underwear emergencies. On the other hand, give then an ST Discovery and an empty circuit and they are happy bunnies.

Ps - though there may be a few relative beginners in that melee I would say that most appear to be competant flyers!

Edited By Bob Cotsford on 09/11/2018 11:51:57

Ikura09/11/2018 12:13:00
avatar
226 forum posts
Posted by Nigel R on 09/11/2018 11:32:09:

"The Bristish..."

...to be found near Bristol? smiley

Or anywhere else they can't spell wink

alex nicol09/11/2018 13:07:52
172 forum posts
4 photos

my twopenethworth,

It's a hobby it should be fun and enjoyable, foamies are here that's a fact........create an A cert for foamies

Let's face it who wants to walk out of the shop with their latest purchase only to be told it's rubbish, because it hasn't got wheels or it won't fly in the wind or you can't sit your test with that.

I think if you look at some of the responses on here it could have a fair bit to do with the decline. At the end of the day we are all modellers and any thing from a frisbe to a foamie that flies should be appreciated.

Right, that's me done I'm going back in my box (made of foam)

Dave Hess09/11/2018 13:28:08
224 forum posts
17 photos
Posted by Ikura on 09/11/2018 11:11:10:

I think you are missing something Dave.

What works in America doesn't often work here. The Bristish are more reserved and prefer to do things in a more careful and controlled manner with individual tuition, hopefully leading them to gain an A certificate.

Mass foam board toy launches are fine if that is your thing. The OP was stating that lightweight foam beginners models are probably not the best place to start, and you propose that lightweight foam board models are a great place to start?

You've sort of hit the nail on the head. It could or would work here, except that the dinasaurs of the industry and the fun prevention police are trying to force the hobby in the way you suggest. It's not the British being reserved that's holding us back. It's jobsworth luddites! The old guys in the club who train newbs to get their A and B certs force the methods that were used on themselves 30 years ago onto these newbs without ever thinking that there might be different ways. You can see this right here on this forum. RC flying is more accessible than it's ever been. The last thing we should do is restrict it with paradymes from the '70s and '80s.

Yes, I am suggesting lightweight foam planes are a good place to start. They fly better, are generally more robust and they're easier to repair. Beginners don't like to fly when windy period. It's nothing to do with what their planes are made of. Of course if you offer them a chance to buddy-box a club hack, where there's no risk to their pockets or flying career, they'll take it.

I fly lightweight foam planes myself - generally aound 1KG or less. The wind doesn't bother me one iota. If anybody else is flying, so will I. Nobody enjoys flying in gales/ heavy winds, except maybe the slope soarers.

Steve J09/11/2018 13:45:23
avatar
763 forum posts
31 photos
Posted by Mike Etheridge 1 on 08/11/2018 16:18:20:

I would recommend the foam Twinstar 2 as a good plane to learn on.

+1. Great plane for a beginner. I learnt how to land using one. Another great beginner's model is the EasyStar/Bixler.

Steve

conrad taggart09/11/2018 13:51:18
18 forum posts

My Bixler does reasonably well in the wind. Plus it wouldn't be difficult to put a stabiliser in it (not the awful thing in the Apprentice) to make it behave like an even bigger plane on windy days. Others even mentioned the idea of having a more traditional club trainer for beginners which could be used on windy days. Being a beginner I think this is a great idea.

If foam models did not exist there would certainly be a lot less beginners, which could hardly be a good thing.

Ikura you are right about Americans being different. They are more forward and know a lot more about marketing and how to capture the general public's attention and imagination. Only by appealing to would be new flyers can you grow the hobby so I don't seem the harm in this, If something like the Ohio event was done at the Chatsworth show or part of some other big even it would certainly stand a very good chance of working.

When Dave first mentioned the Flite Fest Ohio 2018 event involving hundreds of pilots I thought he was making the opposite point - i.e. suggesting that the UK may be inundated with foam planes if they are not stamped out rather than highlighting how successful they are and can be in opening up, what is a very insular and declining hobby, to new would be participants.

At some point, something will replace foam and I am sure the same sort of comments being made here will be made about its replacement. However, for the moment it is here and for very good reasons. Those that hark back to the old days perhaps should bear the following in mind and if the hobby doesn’t continue to change then it will die


“The Only Thing That Is Constant Is Change -”
― Heraclitus

I certainly would not have got started if it wasn’t for foam planes. As I said in my earlier post I have more traditional models that I prefer, but have set them aside until I am good enough , or arguably even deserve, to fly them.

eflightray09/11/2018 15:27:34
avatar
495 forum posts
107 photos
Posted by Dave Hess on 09/11/2018 13:28:08:

You've sort of hit the nail on the head. It could or would work here, except that the dinasaurs of the industry and the fun prevention police are trying to force the hobby in the way you suggest. It's not the British being reserved that's holding us back. It's jobsworth luddites! The old guys in the club who train newbs to get their A and B certs force the methods that were used on themselves 30 years ago onto these newbs without ever thinking that there might be different ways. You can see this right here on this forum. RC flying is more accessible than it's ever been. The last thing we should do is restrict it with paradymes from the '70s and '80s.

Yes, I am suggesting lightweight foam planes are a good place to start. They fly better, are generally more robust and they're easier to repair. Beginners don't like to fly when windy period. It's nothing to do with what their planes are made of. Of course if you offer them a chance to buddy-box a club hack, where there's no risk to their pockets or flying career, they'll take it.

I fly lightweight foam planes myself - generally aound 1KG or less. The wind doesn't bother me one iota. If anybody else is flying, so will I. Nobody enjoys flying in gales/ heavy winds, except maybe the slope soarers.

Absolutely spot on. yes

Ray.

john stones 109/11/2018 16:21:42
avatar
9986 forum posts
1472 photos
Posted by eflightray on 09/11/2018 15:27:34:
Posted by Dave Hess on 09/11/2018 13:28:08:

You've sort of hit the nail on the head. It could or would work here, except that the dinasaurs of the industry and the fun prevention police are trying to force the hobby in the way you suggest. It's not the British being reserved that's holding us back. It's jobsworth luddites! The old guys in the club who train newbs to get their A and B certs force the methods that were used on themselves 30 years ago onto these newbs without ever thinking that there might be different ways. You can see this right here on this forum. RC flying is more accessible than it's ever been. The last thing we should do is restrict it with paradymes from the '70s and '80s.

Yes, I am suggesting lightweight foam planes are a good place to start. They fly better, are generally more robust and they're easier to repair. Beginners don't like to fly when windy period. It's nothing to do with what their planes are made of. Of course if you offer them a chance to buddy-box a club hack, where there's no risk to their pockets or flying career, they'll take it.

I fly lightweight foam planes myself - generally aound 1KG or less. The wind doesn't bother me one iota. If anybody else is flying, so will I. Nobody enjoys flying in gales/ heavy winds, except maybe the slope soarers.

Absolutely spot on. yes

Ray.

Spot on is it, can you enlighten me then please.

What have the Dinosaurs of the industry done you don't like ?

What have the fun prevention police, jobsworth Luddites done ?

Who are these old guys who train for A B certs and force their will on you ?

What's a 70s 80s paradigm and how are you being restricted by it ?

Do lightweight foamies really fly "better" or do you just like them (nothing wrong with that) .

alex nicol09/11/2018 16:37:58
172 forum posts
4 photos

Yeah..........What have the dinosaurs ever done for us lol

Sorry just couldn't resist that........it just caused recollection of a certain scene from MP's Life of Brian

PatMc09/11/2018 16:44:52
avatar
3900 forum posts
489 photos

Posted by Dave Hess on 09/11/2018 13:28:08:

It could or would work here, except that the dinasaurs of the industry and the fun prevention police are trying to force the hobby in the way you suggest. It's not the British being reserved that's holding us back. It's jobsworth luddites! The old guys in the club who train newbs to get their A and B certs force the methods that were used on themselves 30 years ago onto these newbs without ever thinking that there might be different ways. You can see this right here on this forum. RC flying is more accessible than it's ever been. The last thing we should do is restrict it with paradymes from the '70s and '80s.

This is simply a description of an imagined situation using atypical stereotypes & cliches. It's your personal predjudices dressed up as progressive thinking.

john stones 109/11/2018 16:53:34
avatar
9986 forum posts
1472 photos
Posted by PatMc on 09/11/2018 16:44:52:

Posted by Dave Hess on 09/11/2018 13:28:08:

It could or would work here, except that the dinasaurs of the industry and the fun prevention police are trying to force the hobby in the way you suggest. It's not the British being reserved that's holding us back. It's jobsworth luddites! The old guys in the club who train newbs to get their A and B certs force the methods that were used on themselves 30 years ago onto these newbs without ever thinking that there might be different ways. You can see this right here on this forum. RC flying is more accessible than it's ever been. The last thing we should do is restrict it with paradymes from the '70s and '80s.

This is simply a description of an imagined situation using atypical stereotypes & cliches. It's your personal predjudices dressed up as progressive thinking.

Absolutely spot on yes

Dave Hess09/11/2018 18:36:22
224 forum posts
17 photos

As Einstein said, you can't solve the problem with the thinking that was used to create it.

Steve Colman09/11/2018 18:37:38
avatar
688 forum posts
410 photos

Some interesting comments made here, especially about flying light foam models in windy conditions.

For me, when it gets too windy that most in my club stop flying, I fly my lightest foam model and have an absolute blast with it. The model in question being the HK Hummer @ 565g. On many occasions, the Hummer has been seen flying inverted in a rearwards direction along the strip much to the dismay of onlookers.

Agreed, this wouldn't be a suitable situation for beginers but to dismiss foamies as not suitable for beginers because they're too light is a misnomer to me. I taught myself to fly using small, light foam models and now fly all sorts and enjoy them all for different reasons. However, I'm happy to admit that I do prefer the, more or less, instant response of lightweight models in comparison to their heavier brethren.

PatMc09/11/2018 18:56:47
avatar
3900 forum posts
489 photos
Posted by Dave Hess on 09/11/2018 18:36:22:

As Einstein said, you can't solve the problem with the thinking that was used to create it.

What problem do you have in mind ?

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of RCM&E? Use our magazine locator link to find your nearest stockist!

Find RCM&E! 

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Expo Tools 14 July
Airtek Hobbies
Wings & Wheels 2018
Slec
Gliders Distribution
CML
Overlander
Motion RC
electricwingman 2017
Advertise With Us
Sarik
Latest "For Sale" Ads
Which part of building a new traditional balsa aeroplane do you enjoy the most?
Q: Which part of building a new traditional balsa aeroplane do you enjoy the most?

 Research & choosing the model
 Building the fuselage
 Installing the engine and radio systems
 Building the flying surfaces
 Covering/painting/finishing
 All of it!
 None of it. I'd rather someone else did it!
 Other

Latest Reviews
Digital Back Issues

RCM&E Digital Back Issues

Contact us

Contact us