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Which Set Should I buy

Easy to programme, Mid Range Price, Reliable.

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Geoff S01/11/2018 16:17:15
3669 forum posts
26 photos

I don't see anything wrong with doing a little research which also involves finding out what others experience is and then making up your own mind. After all, Eric had never come across FrSky radio gear before and it's now widely used (including by me). I'd recommend Frsky - either Taranis or Horus - bought from a UK supplier, but I would think any modern radio equipment works well and is reliable.

There seems to ba a dearh of sad experts on this forum - so-called or otherwise (I probably score higher on the former)

Geoff

McG 696901/11/2018 16:37:56
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3251 forum posts
1233 photos

Apologies for my so-called lack of expertise, but is "frysky" a new brand???

Anyhow if it is "Exelent", it must be Wright... yes

Cheers

Chris

Frank Skilbeck01/11/2018 16:42:30
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4736 forum posts
101 photos
Posted by Anthony Wright 3 on 01/11/2018 16:21:20:

Hello I use frysky Exelent radio. It just annoys me that nobody can think for themselves anymore!

Would make forums very boring though.

As for the radio sets, they are all basically OK. My recent experience in programming other peoples radios with lower/mid end sets has been Spektrum Dx9, Futaba 6J (8 channels) and Multiplex Cockpit Sx9, the Sx9 is about the easiest to program, followed by the Spectrum and then Futaba, but all of them were quite straightforward. I've tried to help a couple of Open Tx users on the field but not being familiar with the system have not been able to help and the owners have had to go and resort to the internet for help.If you are in a club with an Open Tx expert then this wouldn't be an issue, but if you aren't then you'd need to invest some time on the internet looking at various tutorials etc.

Edited By Frank Skilbeck on 01/11/2018 16:45:00

Bob Cotsford01/11/2018 16:44:56
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8596 forum posts
483 photos
Posted by McG 6969 on 01/11/2018 16:37:56:

Apologies for my so-called lack of expertise, but is "frysky" a new brand???

Anyhow if it is "Exelent", it must be Wright... yes

Cheers

Chris

laugh There are times when I really wish we had 'like' tags on this forum

Anthony Wright 301/11/2018 16:51:01
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9 forum posts

Sorry about the spelling mistake ,Frsky . You’re all on the ball aren’t you? Must do better.

Stearman6501/11/2018 17:19:19
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770 forum posts
893 photos
Posted by Anthony Wright 3 on 01/11/2018 15:43:37:

Hello ever thought of making your own mind up? If you say you are building a model requiring 8 functions (which I find highly unlikely) can’t you work this out all by your self ? Or like the rest of the sad so-called experts do you need some else to tell you what to do ?

There's an old saying "what will hold a lot will hold a little", which is the reason I mentioned 8 channels. My Stinson if I ever finish it will have 4 basic channels, throttle, ailerons, elevator, & rudder. Plus flaps, landing lights, nav' lights & an animated pilot, the camera I will probably run continuously, but if I decided to control it would need an extra channel.. So that's a full house. The warmliner will have 5 channels, so that's on the "little" side. Read my thread on the Stinson build for more info. Being out of the game for 11 years, technology has moved on.

**LINK**

Edited By Eric Shepherd on 01/11/2018 17:20:52

Stearman6501/11/2018 17:24:10
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770 forum posts
893 photos

Thanks everyone for your input, it's given me much to look at & some I've never even heard of.surprise

Frank Skilbeck01/11/2018 17:50:37
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4736 forum posts
101 photos

Eric, also now you would probably have 5 basic channel as it is more normal now to put the ailerons on separate channels so you can electronically dial in some aileron differential, which helps offset adverse yaw. On some of my models I have different amounts of differential on different flight phase, increased differential for take off and landing to avoid adverse yaw at low speeds, and less for aerobatics.

Peter Christy01/11/2018 17:55:38
1823 forum posts

Eric: Don't worry too much! Flying is like riding a bicycle - you may get rusty, but you don't fall off!

Last year, I booked an "air experience" flight (full-size) to celebrate the 50th anniversary of my going solo. Despite not being at the controls of a full-size for around 49 years, I managed the take-off, climb-out and basic manoeuvres without any physical input from the instructor! Even the landing was passable! (Well, I didn't break anything!)

Models are the same. It won't take you long to get "back in the saddle"!

As far as radio gear is concerned, the last few years have seen dramatic changes in the technology. However, there is nothing wrong with the "old stuff", and many of the flyers in my club still fly on 35Mhz. Any of the major brands will serve you well. However, it is worth bearing in mind the cost of the airborne equipment when you choose. If you stick at it, you will probably want to build yet more models, and the difference in cost between receivers is dramatic! The difference in performance is not! All modern equipment is built on automated production lines - often in China - and many of the cheaper receivers perform just as well as "major brand" ones costing four or five times as much. Indeed, one of the newer arrivals has established itself as a "major brand" ridiculously quickly. This is because it works, and is a lot less expensive than the traditional manufacturers!

I would wholeheartedly agree that local knowledge is very useful, though. I would recommend avoiding any manufacturer who doesn't have at least one user in your local club! At least, until you have managed to re-gain some experience.

Best of luck! And let us know what you decide to go with and why. It may help others in a similar situation!

wink

--

Pete

Stearman6501/11/2018 19:18:58
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770 forum posts
893 photos
Posted by Peter Christy on 01/11/2018 17:55:38:

Eric: Don't worry too much! Flying is like riding a bicycle - you may get rusty, but you don't fall off!

Last year, I booked an "air experience" flight (full-size) to celebrate the 50th anniversary of my going solo. Despite not being at the controls of a full-size for around 49 years, I managed the take-off, climb-out and basic manoeuvres without any physical input from the instructor! Even the landing was passable! (Well, I didn't break anything!)

Models are the same. It won't take you long to get "back in the saddle"!

As far as radio gear is concerned, the last few years have seen dramatic changes in the technology. However, there is nothing wrong with the "old stuff", and many of the flyers in my club still fly on 35Mhz. Any of the major brands will serve you well. However, it is worth bearing in mind the cost of the airborne equipment when you choose. If you stick at it, you will probably want to build yet more models, and the difference in cost between receivers is dramatic! The difference in performance is not! All modern equipment is built on automated production lines - often in China - and many of the cheaper receivers perform just as well as "major brand" ones costing four or five times as much. Indeed, one of the newer arrivals has established itself as a "major brand" ridiculously quickly. This is because it works, and is a lot less expensive than the traditional manufacturers!

I would wholeheartedly agree that local knowledge is very useful, though. I would recommend avoiding any manufacturer who doesn't have at least one user in your local club! At least, until you have managed to re-gain some experience.

Best of luck! And let us know what you decide to go with and why. It may help others in a similar situation!

wink

--

Pete

Thanks Pete, Sound advise.yes

Stearman6501/11/2018 19:25:01
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770 forum posts
893 photos
Posted by Frank Skilbeck on 01/11/2018 17:50:37:

Eric, also now you would probably have 5 basic channel as it is more normal now to put the ailerons on separate channels so you can electronically dial in some aileron differential, which helps offset adverse yaw. On some of my models I have different amounts of differential on different flight phase, increased differential for take off and landing to avoid adverse yaw at low speeds, and less for aerobatics.

Hi Frank.

I had that facility on my last radio, a JR but never got used to programming it in. Which is why I mentioned ease of programming. I don't have a smart phone, just a PC, Laptop, tablet & 3 digital cameras. I moved from flying to digital photography which taught me a lot, so after 11 years, this time I should be able to master the modern radios.wink

Regards Ericyes

Old Geezer01/11/2018 20:10:03
670 forum posts

Eric, something that has been largely ignored so far is the ergonomics of the set - in my opinion the only manufacturer to seriously approach the ergonomics of a Tx are Multiplex. Without labouring the bloomin' obvious, you are going to be holding the Tx and manipulating the sticks plus one or two switches and perhaps a slider for the entirety of every flight so comfort is vital - with the offset orientation of the gimbals and that most subsidiary controls are reachable without much change of grip - - - well, it feels as if it had been designed by the guys at Saab - anyone who's owned a Saab will know what I mean. You get in, it was designed around you, everything was where it should be and comfortably within reach.

And programming a Cockpit SX is extremely straightforward - the only down side of the Cockpit is the price, not exactly at the budget end of the market - but once you've held a Multiplex set you're hooked. Go on, at least have proper look at one!

Devcon101/11/2018 20:20:29
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1412 forum posts
493 photos

Hi Eric,

Futaba, JR, Spectrum, Hitec, FrSky, Jeti, Multiplex + a few other players will, I think, deliver all of your basic needs.

The factors to influence your decision will be initial purchase cost, ongoing hardware costs, radio link reliability, software functionality and the longevity of the brand.

Difficult for me to produce a table with all the variables but my personal experience led me to plump for FrSky which I'm very happy with, although I still use Spektrum for some legacy models, and can't imagine changing again.

Hope this helps.

John

Stearman6501/11/2018 20:29:36
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770 forum posts
893 photos

Thanks Devcon 1 & Old geezer. All duly noted. As it is difficult to find a shop with stock I may visit a few local clubs & see if I can blag my way in to go see.

Thanks again.

Regards Eric.

Stephen Smith 1401/11/2018 20:30:22
211 forum posts
Posted by Anthony Wright 3 on 01/11/2018 15:43:37:

Hello ever thought of making your own mind up? If you say you are building a model requiring 8 functions (which I find highly unlikely) can’t you work this out all by your self ? Or like the rest of the sad so-called experts do you need some else to tell you what to do ?

LOL

PatMc01/11/2018 22:14:27
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4409 forum posts
530 photos
Posted by Old Geezer on 01/11/2018 20:10:03:

Eric, something that has been largely ignored so far is the ergonomics of the set - in my opinion the only manufacturer to seriously approach the ergonomics of a Tx are Multiplex. Without labouring the bloomin' obvious, you are going to be holding the Tx and manipulating the sticks plus one or two switches and perhaps a slider for the entirety of every flight so comfort is vital - with the offset orientation of the gimbals and that most subsidiary controls are reachable without much change of grip - - - well, it feels as if it had been designed by the guys at Saab - anyone who's owned a Saab will know what I mean. You get in, it was designed around you, everything was where it should be and comfortably within reach.

And programming a Cockpit SX is extremely straightforward - the only down side of the Cockpit is the price, not exactly at the budget end of the market - but once you've held a Multiplex set you're hooked. Go on, at least have proper look at one!

I have a 35meg Cockpit SX with a FrSky hack module wired in via a switch. Because the SX has synthisized RF system I can use 35meg Rx's on any Xtl as well as V8 & D series Frsky Rx's. Although I do quite like the Tx and find that using the optional "rubber duck" aerial a boon when slope soaring, I can't say that the I find the Tx particularly comfortable to hold & I find the offset orientation gimbles mildly irritating.
The Sx has one of the most comprehensive manuals I've come across but IMO programming is anything but straightforward & the manual is often required.
OTOH once I'd got over the initial few hurdles with the Taranis I found programming even quite complex setups quite intuitive. I have at times needed to ask for help when upgrading firmware etc but these upgrades have always been by choice not through necessity.

Edited By PatMc on 01/11/2018 22:16:02

Dave Cooper 301/11/2018 23:25:45
65 forum posts

Hi again Eric - just a few final comments from me. I'm basically a Futaba man (35 MHz) and I think their '2.4' spec's are very impressive. The problem for me is I will have 5+ models on the go next year, so, Rx cost comes into it very strongly and I don't want to disturb each installation to swap out a trusted Rx every time.

I read a tech' review on Aurora 9 the other day and it seems there may have been an issue with 'dead-spots' at the extremities of stick travel. This may have been fixed now, but, worth checking out. (potentiometer mis-alignment ?)

Taranis - this is most likely my new route for 2019 - a 3-metre, vintage, scale glider. I can put you in touch with an "Open TX" expert who will talk you through a complete set-up over the phone. BTW their Limited Edition Tx now has 'hall-effect' sticks - beautifully smooth when I tried them last week !

Dave

Anthony Wright 302/11/2018 00:56:45
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9 forum posts

An open TX expert! I rest my case .

Allan Bennett02/11/2018 04:30:11
1689 forum posts
49 photos
Posted by Dave Cooper 3 on 01/11/2018 23:25:45:

Hi again Eric - just a few final comments from me. I'm basically a Futaba man (35 MHz) and I think their '2.4' spec's are very impressive. The problem for me is I will have 5+ models on the go next year, so, Rx cost comes into it very strongly and I don't want to disturb each installation to swap out a trusted Rx every time . . . . .

Dave

I was a dedicated Futaba man -- both 35 and 2.4 -- but I went to Frsky Taranis last year when I couldn't find a way to apply throttle-cut to two separate throttle channels. I now make a small profit almost every time I sell my Futaba 6 or 7 channel FASST receiver on eBay and replace it with a Frsky stabilised model. Replicating the original Futaba setups with the Frsky gear has so far been a doddle, in fixed-wing aircraft, flybarred and fbl helis, and in quadcopters. In fact in my quads at the moment I'm using Frsky flight controllers with built-in receivers, so none of the usual interface problems. I've got 15 models converted at the moment, with a few yet to do.

Stearman6502/11/2018 06:38:08
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770 forum posts
893 photos

Thanks again Anthony Dave & PatMc. All your comments & advice duly noted & welcomed. I obviously need to get my hands on a number so different manufacturers kit. How I will achieve this I'm not sure yet. My nearest club is difficult to get to the flying field. The nearest large retailer doesn't have stock on the shelves & I don't believe he would want to unpack the sets they do have just to let me twiddle the sticks. Some more research is needed before I take the plunge, winter is coming, so being a fair weather flyer would mean I have a couple of months before I buy. Thanks again.

Ericyes

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