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Heated Gloves

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Andy C21/11/2018 18:17:01
146 forum posts

I'm thinking of treating myself to some cheap heated gloves and thought I would check for recommendations on here before I buy some. Seem to be a lot around on Ebay and Amazon which are powered from a simple USB power pack which I like the idea of.

So, anyone else tried them?

Peter Miller21/11/2018 18:39:16
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9909 forum posts
1160 photos
10 articles

Many years ago I had a pair that had a D cell in each glove. They worked well but the batteries didn't last all afternoon.Modern batteries willprbably last longer and one can buy rechargeable D cells.

Andy C22/11/2018 07:54:01
146 forum posts

Thanks Peter. The ones I am looking at use a USB power pack (think back up phone charger) so would expect them to last a suitable time.

From the rate of responses coming in am I to assume as a southern softy I am the only one getting cold when flying in winter? laugh

Ben B22/11/2018 08:18:51
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1390 forum posts
4 photos

What I've traditionally done for sub zero flying is get some gloves and cut little holes in the end of the thumbs (I'm a stick flier). Worked well for 4 channel planes but quads with their modes, arming switches etc don't work quite as well. For this winter I've got a banggood transmitter mit and a 12v 20W silicon heating pad- I've stuck the silicon pad onto a thin sheet of ali to act as a heater spreader. The heating pad is powered by a lipo through a basic PWM power controlled (so I can adjust the power from inside the mitt). Only real issue is the fact that I have to keep on changing lipos- 3 minutes a flight!!!

Peter Miller22/11/2018 08:36:20
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9909 forum posts
1160 photos
10 articles

Someone on the forum said they had the 10-10 rule. Temp above 10 degrees, Wind below 10 mph.

I am am going to adopt that rule.

Trevor22/11/2018 10:09:36
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354 forum posts
51 photos

I tend to agree Peter, but the rule doesn’t work too well for slope soaring! Also, the best winter soaring conditions do tend to be when the wind is in the north - dry and bright, with the sun behind you. I’m a Reynauld’s sufferer so am interested to hear more about folk’s experience with heated gloves.

Trevor

Cuban822/11/2018 10:09:59
2493 forum posts
10 photos
Posted by Peter Miller on 22/11/2018 08:36:20:

Someone on the forum said they had the 10-10 rule. Temp above 10 degrees, Wind below 10 mph.

I am am going to adopt that rule.

Very sensible. Mind you, I'm reminded of an episode of 'Ice Pilots' (brilliant series) where in the depths of the Canadian winter, they go by the 40 40 40 rule, which IIRC, was something along the lines of .... flying will be scrubbed if the temp is lower than minus forty at your departure point or - lower than minus forty at your destination - or winds exceeding 40 mph. surprise

They must think our winters are positively balmy, but they don't have to put up with the damp and floodings (except during a thaw).

Edited By Cuban8 on 22/11/2018 10:11:38

Geoff Sleath22/11/2018 10:40:47
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3248 forum posts
247 photos

I use some heated fingerless gloves I bought on eBay. I've tried 2. The first were very cheap and worked OK but weren't very well made so I bought the second, slightly more expensive ones which are much better. The heated pads are contained in a fairly substantial fabric case with an elastic wrist and finger loop so they are held on the back of the hand. They come with a pair of knitted fingerless gloves which are intended for women, I think, because they are quite small. The doesn't bother me because I have small hands. However, the design means the heated pads could be used with any pair of gloves. I think paying a little more is better and, in any case, they're not very expensive <£20 IIRC but it's over a year since I got mine.

I power mine from a Turnigy 10AH battery so-called power pack which has 2 USB outputs. It's much more than sufficient for a winter day's use and fits easily in a pocket. I think there are lots of similar packs available.

I never used to feel the cold much (many years of mid-winter motor cycling in all weathers) but since I injured my spine, my right hand particularly feels the cold a lot. These gloves help a lot and I strongly recommend them.

One thing to be aware of is to keep the connecting wires from hanging loose to avoid any mishaps with spinning propellers or generally catching on things. I put the wires down my sleeves which is a bit awkward to do but works well. I usually do it at home before setting out.

I'm also an advocate these days of only going flying if the temperature is in double figures but if it's very dry and still it can be comfortable at much lower temperatures I find.

Geoff

Braddock, VC22/11/2018 11:04:14
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1600 forum posts
68 photos

When I was younger used to do a lot of wildfowling which tends to rely on poor conditions to promote the contents of one's game bag, two tips the first was from an old lincolnshire fowler, the second is one I discovered for myself.

To keep your hands warm, on the way to do your chosen activity find some ground water, if it's got ice on so much the better, dip your hands in and wet them thoroughly then let them air dry. Don't knock it til you've tried it. You won't need gloves if your circulation is up to par.

To keep your feet warm, spray them with antiperspirant before putting your socks on, when walking the feet perspire then when stationary the sweat evaporates and causes cold feet. The antiperspirant prevents that. DON'T spray it all over your body, I did once and with a three mile walk over mudflats with a large gun and a 100 cartridges my body overheated to the point where my face was purple and my friend thought I was having a cardiac arrest.

Edited By Braddock, VC on 22/11/2018 11:04:48

Cuban822/11/2018 11:20:07
2493 forum posts
10 photos

I used to fly in more or less any conditions years ago, but no longer enjoy the dampness of our winters. The cold in itself is not so much of a problem, and can be guarded against with modern clothing. Heated gloves sound good and I might give them a try for general winter use, not only just flying.

Wind chill is the 'killer'. I know I'm 'teaching my granny to suck eggs' but you've really got to get a good and breathable wind proof outer barrier over your layers of inner insulation. I adopt a double approach in that I have a quality woollen pullover which has a sewn in (breathable) wind proof membrane (it was bought for me years ago as a present and I think it's actually golfing apparel) and with extra layers and a light wind proof outer, my core never gets cold. Thermal long johns take care of the legs. Feet and hands are the problem. Heated gloves for the hands sound fine - but I've never really cured the cold feet problem - made worse by the fact that we do tend to stand about, either flying or chatting and the poor old feet just refrigerate. Heated socks, perhaps.

I've seen people flying in huge ski boots, but what a mess trying to clean them up, if the field's muddy.

Edited By Cuban8 on 22/11/2018 11:23:46

John Lee22/11/2018 15:12:17
628 forum posts
46 photos

So glad I bought the RC Gloves when they were available, discussed in this thread where I did a review. 5 years on and much worn they are still as good as new, I was flying with them yesterday in comfort.

For the feet I use Muck Boot Artic Sports, again expensive but again you get what you pay for, they are also like new after 3 years & effective in keeping the feet warm in sub zero temperatures.

Eagle 89922/11/2018 15:28:52
avatar
171 forum posts
16 photos

I bought two pairs and they are very good but, I have Raynaud's and my fingers from the middle knuckle still go white within a few minutes, just not as quickly as when I don't wear them frown

I would like to try heated gloves that send the heat directly to the fingers, if they exist?

Shep

Ron Gray22/11/2018 15:31:07
1414 forum posts
358 photos

I use my motorcycle heated waistcoat and heated inner gloves powered form the same rechargeable battery. Not cheap but lasts all day and is adjustable for heat. Mind you I don't wear the gloves whilst flying and sometimes don't bother with them at all, just use hand warmers for in between flights.

Colin Carpenter22/11/2018 15:44:57
547 forum posts
35 photos

I must be lucky ! Just put a coat on over my shirt ! Got a pair of £1 gloves Mrs cut tops off thumb and finger .Put them on if it's cold wind while flying ! I wear same pair of goretex boots all year to keep feet dry ! I drive my Mrs up the wall cos I'm always saying it's not cold !😁😁 2 of us this morning early . Minus 2 lots of sun no wind .Lovely 😉😉 Colin

conrad taggart22/11/2018 15:54:03
65 forum posts
Posted by Geoff Sleath on 22/11/2018 10:40:47:

I use some heated fingerless gloves I bought on eBay. I've tried 2. The first were very cheap and worked OK but weren't very well made so I bought the second, slightly more expensive ones which are much better. The heated pads are contained in a fairly substantial fabric case with an elastic wrist and finger loop so they are held on the back of the hand. They come with a pair of knitted fingerless gloves which are intended for women, I think, because they are quite small. The doesn't bother me because I have small hands. However, the design means the heated pads could be used with any pair of gloves. I think paying a little more is better and, in any case, they're not very expensive <£20 IIRC but it's over a year since I got mine.

I power mine from a Turnigy 10AH battery so-called power pack which has 2 USB outputs. It's much more than sufficient for a winter day's use and fits easily in a pocket. I think there are lots of similar packs available.

I never used to feel the cold much (many years of mid-winter motor cycling in all weathers) but since I injured my spine, my right hand particularly feels the cold a lot. These gloves help a lot and I strongly recommend them.

One thing to be aware of is to keep the connecting wires from hanging loose to avoid any mishaps with spinning propellers or generally catching on things. I put the wires down my sleeves which is a bit awkward to do but works well. I usually do it at home before setting out.

I'm also an advocate these days of only going flying if the temperature is in double figures but if it's very dry and still it can be comfortable at much lower temperatures I find.

Geoff

Geoff would you have a link or the make / supplier of the gloves - sound like a good solution ? Thanks Conrad

Eagle 89922/11/2018 16:08:20
avatar
171 forum posts
16 photos
Posted by Colin Carpenter on 22/11/2018 15:44:57:

I must be lucky ! Just put a coat on over my shirt ! Got a pair of £1 gloves Mrs cut tops off thumb and finger .Put them on if it's cold wind while flying ! I wear same pair of goretex boots all year to keep feet dry ! I drive my Mrs up the wall cos I'm always saying it's not cold !😁😁 2 of us this morning early . Minus 2 lots of sun no wind .Lovely 😉😉 Colin

You certainly are Colin yes

As a youth on a flight deck in the Arctic it was often below -30 and the wind chill during launch/retrieve made it a lot worse but it didn't bother me then.
Nowadays Raynaud's and age dictate otherwisecrying

Bob Cotsford22/11/2018 16:24:55
avatar
7826 forum posts
433 photos

If it's that cold that I'm worried about gloves then it's too cold to be standing around in a field. It never used to be that way but old(er) age is catching up with me.

Geoff Sleath22/11/2018 16:34:47
avatar
3248 forum posts
247 photos
Posted by conrad taggart on 22/11/2018 15:54:03:
Posted by Geoff Sleath on 22/11/2018 10:40:47:

I use some heated fingerless gloves I bought on eBay. I've tried 2. The first were very cheap and worked OK but weren't very well made so I bought the second, slightly more expensive ones which are much better. The heated pads are contained in a fairly substantial fabric case with an elastic wrist and finger loop so they are held on the back of the hand. They come with a pair of knitted fingerless gloves which are intended for women, I think, because they are quite small. The doesn't bother me because I have small hands. However, the design means the heated pads could be used with any pair of gloves. I think paying a little more is better and, in any case, they're not very expensive <£20 IIRC but it's over a year since I got mine.

I power mine from a Turnigy 10AH battery so-called power pack which has 2 USB outputs. It's much more than sufficient for a winter day's use and fits easily in a pocket. I think there are lots of similar packs available.

I never used to feel the cold much (many years of mid-winter motor cycling in all weathers) but since I injured my spine, my right hand particularly feels the cold a lot. These gloves help a lot and I strongly recommend them.

One thing to be aware of is to keep the connecting wires from hanging loose to avoid any mishaps with spinning propellers or generally catching on things. I put the wires down my sleeves which is a bit awkward to do but works well. I usually do it at home before setting out.

I'm also an advocate these days of only going flying if the temperature is in double figures but if it's very dry and still it can be comfortable at much lower temperatures I find.

Geoff

Geoff would you have a link or the make / supplier of the gloves - sound like a good solution ? Thanks Conrad

Looking at my eBay purchase history it seems I bought them on 23 Dec 2017 and they were £11.67. The seller was called SavannahSolutions but they don't have a presence now.

This is what they look like:

heated gloves.jpg

I just did an eBay search for heated fingerless gloves and there were myriad suppliers. I've had a quick look and there are several where the gloves are similar but none with the same heating element. Most are less than a fiver so it's worth a punt regardless. They seem to be supplied for laptop use (outside? or in unheated Chinese not-sweatshops? )

Geoff

Nigel R22/11/2018 16:52:24
avatar
2847 forum posts
467 photos

Those RC Gloves were/are pretty good. Not heated though. But enough to keep fingers OK in single digit conditions. At least for long enough to get a couple of flights in.

Shoes, decent boots really help.

Rest of body, 'sufficient' clothing works. Keep your core warm enough and that helps the extremities a lot.

conrad taggart22/11/2018 17:32:56
65 forum posts
Posted by Cuban8 on 22/11/2018 11:20:07:

I used to fly in more or less any conditions years ago, but no longer enjoy the dampness of our winters. The cold in itself is not so much of a problem, and can be guarded against with modern clothing. Heated gloves sound good and I might give them a try for general winter use, not only just flying.

Wind chill is the 'killer'. I know I'm 'teaching my granny to suck eggs' but you've really got to get a good and breathable wind proof outer barrier over your layers of inner insulation. I adopt a double approach in that I have a quality woollen pullover which has a sewn in (breathable) wind proof membrane (it was bought for me years ago as a present and I think it's actually golfing apparel) and with extra layers and a light wind proof outer, my core never gets cold. Thermal long johns take care of the legs. Feet and hands are the problem. Heated gloves for the hands sound fine - but I've never really cured the cold feet problem - made worse by the fact that we do tend to stand about, either flying or chatting and the poor old feet just refrigerate. Heated socks, perhaps.

I've seen people flying in huge ski boots, but what a mess trying to clean them up, if the field's muddy.

Edited By Cuban8 on 22/11/2018 11:23:46

 

The best cure for cold feet is probably these. I used them when I was winter grayling fishing in thew middle of the river Dove with water just under my armpits and it was so cold I had to dip the rod in the river to de-ice the rod rings and the line that was stuck to them so I could cast ....

**LINK**

 

Well worth giving them a go. Just pulled mine out of the sock draw they were black with a navy blue ring around the top, but I am sure the ones above are just a more modern and fashionable version.

Conrad

 

Edited By conrad taggart on 22/11/2018 17:34:03

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