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Can a drone fly at 10000ft?

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kc15/12/2018 10:43:05
6211 forum posts
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The BBC report a near miss between a Boeing 737 and a drone at 10,000ft . Can a quadcopter of the hobby type fly at that sort of height?

Ron Gray15/12/2018 11:02:00
1604 forum posts
394 photos

That’s a tad under 2 miles, quite a few, more expensive, ‘hobby’ type have a range of 2 miles!

John Muir15/12/2018 11:20:55
375 forum posts
1 photos

The altitude record for a rotorcraft on FPVLAB is currently 9,898ft, set by a mini quad. So still 102 ft to go apparently.

Steve J15/12/2018 12:14:23
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1740 forum posts
50 photos

Airprox 2018222.

"The B737 pilot reports that they were being vectored for RW22 at Stansted when the Captain called ‘drone’, at which point the FO looked up and saw a dark coloured square/rectangle shaped object pass down the right side of the aircraft with minimal separation. The airframe was inspected on the ground after landing for any evidence of suspected contact or damage and none was observed."

In the unlikely event that anybody is interested, there are couple of much more interesting reports from the November meeting. 2018160 and 2018164 were raised by SUA pilots against low flying military aircraft.

Steve

Don Fry15/12/2018 12:19:20
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At that height, the 737 doing a couple of hundred miles an hour, minimum.

Now I know God is at the controls, but unless its actually Horus, rather than some other God, you just ain't going to see a small drone at that speed.

So does a REALY big drone carry a battery to get up there. If you can ascend at 20 mph, that's a 6 minute run to get up there.

G194015/12/2018 12:41:07
3523 forum posts
1 photos

Well of course any sensible RC pilot would have been USING a Horus (well the Frsky version) but most of these reports are nonsense as we all at least suspect. Not only would the quad pilot have to have a large battery to provide the energy to get up there it would need to be capable of lifting the battery's mass (as well as all the other gubbins) at 20 mph vertically for 6 minutes (as Don says) to get to 2 miles high.

The pilot would also need very keen eyesight to spot a small drone probably going quite slowly if not hovering whilst being in an aircraft at 200 mph. I would think highly unlikely and somewhat akin to reports of giant feral cats on Exmoor or the Loch Ness monster.

I'm no quad/drone fan but I think they get blamed too often for too many things. They are a convenient scape goat right now.

Geoff

Edited By Pete B - Moderator on 15/12/2018 16:31:55

Don Fry15/12/2018 13:22:15
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4394 forum posts
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Geoff makes a good point about giant cats. Once it gets fashionable to see them, every well fed Tom becomes a cougar in the half light. Same with every plastic bag, oblong or square wafted on a thermal to 2 miles.

Ron Gray15/12/2018 13:22:24
1604 forum posts
394 photos

Black bin bag is more likely culprit, as has happened before!

kc15/12/2018 13:24:01
6211 forum posts
169 photos

The trouble is it's aeromodellers who will be the scapegoat!

Geoff - should we be using technical terms that are not in the Glossary?

John F15/12/2018 13:32:57
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1318 forum posts
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Funny how people always lose objectivity and argue that it could never be any kind of model aircraft involved. You weren't there.

You don't know what they did or did not see yet you all know that it wasn't what they report.

Interesting, from a "let's stick our heads in the sand" point of view.

Is it so hard to believe the report from experienced and professional pilots?
Peter Christy15/12/2018 13:44:16
1668 forum posts

I can see that you *might* be able to get a drone up that high - though its probably right on its limit - but would there be enough juice in the battery to get it down again?

Anything that could ascend to that height would have to be a pretty expensive piece of kit, and I doubt the owner, however stupid otherwise, would wish to jeopardise it by running out of power on the way down!

Amazon? Military?

--

Pete

Don Fry15/12/2018 13:56:54
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4394 forum posts
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Posted by John F on 15/12/2018 13:32:57:
Funny how people always lose objectivity and argue that it could never be any kind of model aircraft involved. You weren't there.

You don't know what they did or did not see yet you all know that it wasn't what they report.

Interesting, from a "let's stick our heads in the sand" point of view.

Is it so hard to believe the report from experienced and professional pilots?

I did in fairness acknowledge a God was at the controls. I for one merely questioned if it was Horus, or a lesser eyed God at the controls.

Steve J15/12/2018 14:02:30
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1740 forum posts
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I'm pretty sure that my FunJet would get to 10000ft in about a minute. I'd have to fit a flight controller/RTH system to get keep it vertical and get it back after the climb. At a delta V of c. 100m/s relative to a 737 it would probably fit the "square/rectangle shaped object" description given by the FO.

Steve

Dave Hess15/12/2018 17:02:56
303 forum posts
18 photos

It's possible to fly a drone at any range now using the 4G network and a smartphone or laptop. No need for a transmitter.

Cuban815/12/2018 17:26:34
2833 forum posts
1 photos
With all the technology in modern airliners, have they omitted to fit a camera to record such incidents?
Erfolg15/12/2018 17:55:35
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11560 forum posts
1274 photos

Earlier this year as bounced my way up the farm track from our field. I spotted a very large animal, sitting on the horizon. I initially imagined a very large dog, perhaps a great Dane, the hound of the Baskerville. Then I saw it was a big cat.

As Bounced towards it, it slowly rose, stretched like a Lion. We are not that far from a local Zoo. Then this pretty ordinary domestic black cat, moved into the bare field. Still no doubt looking for rabbits to Terrorise.

Which did prove to me seeing things at a distance can be misleading, particularly when your imagination is allowed to have a field day (is that a pun, perhaps not). When I told my wife, she was most unimpressed, and told me that three cats had walked through the garden whilst she watched.

Don Fry15/12/2018 18:48:40
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4394 forum posts
52 photos

Bit of psychology. Your eyes are pretty ordinary.

But, in your head is a REALY clever bit of pattern recognition technology, wot says TIGER when you wander through the woods. It's purpose is to make sure you never say, " it's a few stripes in the background"

Because you can scare yourself a thousand times, but when those jaws close on you, that's your last mistake.

And a pilot says, DRONE, not BIN BAG.

Don Fry15/12/2018 18:51:34
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4394 forum posts
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Posted by Cuban8 on 15/12/2018 17:26:34:
With all the technology in modern airliners, have they omitted to fit a camera to record such incidents?

Possibly, but they haven't yet got a system to transmit flight data to ground, before the machine hits the ground.

Outrunner15/12/2018 19:05:55
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57 forum posts
6 photos
Posted by Don Fry on 15/12/2018 18:51:34:
Posted by Cuban8 on 15/12/2018 17:26:34:
With all the technology in modern airliners, have they omitted to fit a camera to record such incidents?

Possibly, but they haven't yet got a system to transmit flight data to ground, before the machine hits the ground.

If they they record the "incident" then it could be played back on the the ground to identify what the object was. Not exactly the cutting edge of science to fit cameras, not just to the cockpit but all over the sircraft.

Phil.

John Lee15/12/2018 19:06:40
686 forum posts
52 photos

As a full size flying instructor I find it pretty easy to distinguish a seagull from a magpie at 130 knots, I'm pretty sure I could tell a drone from a bin bag.

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