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Modelling Board / Pin Board.

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Richard. W.26/01/2019 00:27:07
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65 forum posts

Hi, all.

I have a piece of flat board, 4' x 2' which I use for pinning down when building.. It's roughly 3/8" thick and made of a grey, fibrous material.. Easy enough to push pins into but firm enough to hold them and stay flat.

I bought it about 20 years ago and would like to get another, larger piece but I can't for the life of me remember where I bought it or what it's called.

Any suggestions to a name of this material would be much appreciated, thanks. embarrassed

Don Fry26/01/2019 07:32:04
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4054 forum posts
47 photos

Sundeala?

Geoff Parkes26/01/2019 08:49:08
105 forum posts

The cheapest option is to buy a sheet of plaster board and place on the top, I use this method on top of a ply workbench as cheap chips approx. £5 for 8X4 sheet, I cant get that in my car , so I take a stanley knife and cut in half, this gives you 4 surfaces to build from.

Stearman6526/01/2019 09:46:47
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769 forum posts
893 photos
yesPosted by Geoff Parkes on 26/01/2019 08:49:08:

The cheapest option is to buy a sheet of plaster board and place on the top, I use this method on top of a ply workbench as cheap chips approx. £5 for 8X4 sheet, I cant get that in my car , so I take a stanley knife and cut in half, this gives you 4 surfaces to build from.

David P Williams26/01/2019 10:26:43
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854 forum posts
282 photos

Yes Richard, what you're describing is Sundeala. It's good, but expensive. I used to use it but now use plasterboard like the other chaps - just as good and waaay cheaper. Fixed the old Sundeala on the walls of my wife's artist's studio so she can pin up her masterpieces.

kc26/01/2019 10:33:31
6056 forum posts
169 photos

Plasterboard is good stuff for modelling boards.

Just to add to the info on cutting plasterboard - you dont actually need to cut it with a knife but just score it and then place it over an edge and snap it in two. So take a 4ft bit of 2 by 1 inch batten with you as straight edge and then use to raise the plasterboard up an inch when snapping. Note that B&Q probably won't cut plasterboard on their panel saws to save blunting the circular saw blade. They often sell smaller sizes of plasterboard but buying a full sheet is not much dearer.

Gary Murphy 126/01/2019 10:44:36
378 forum posts
14 photos

I asked this question a few years ago about building board materials after trying many types that were too hard or soft or warped.

I was told to use plaster board, plaster board????????

you can not beat it,for sure.

Percy Verance26/01/2019 11:12:13
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8108 forum posts
155 photos

Sundeala here, a 6foot by 3 foot piece of it. Had it for donkey's years. Sits on a 3 metre length of kitchen worktop in the loft bedroom. When I had my bungalow re-roofed 2 years ago, I got the roofers to pop me two decent Velux windows in right over the bench. Bob on now......yes

Edited By Percy Verance on 26/01/2019 11:15:43

Geoff Sleath26/01/2019 12:13:03
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3433 forum posts
297 photos

My latest building board is a sheet of steel (resting on a flat piece of mdf with stiffening battens underneath) and magnetic building blocks. Much better than pins I find.

Geoff

leccyflyer26/01/2019 12:13:55
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1275 forum posts
302 photos

Yep, Sundeala is the business -provided that it's stuck onto a good solid blockboard or similar base. Left to it's own devices it warps like mad.

Piers Bowlan26/01/2019 14:25:00
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1886 forum posts
45 photos

I have used Sundeala, plasterboard, and even 15mm thick Celotex (It had to be light as it was going a suitcase-don't ask!). I recently bought some 10mm thick (foot square) cork tiles for my new wing building board. I will report back how they work out.

Richard. W.26/01/2019 14:33:50
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65 forum posts

Thanks, guys...... Sundeala is the stuff I have......Never thought of plaster board but might give it a go.. I did try cork tiles a long time ago but wasn't 100% happy with them.

Former Member26/01/2019 19:41:06
724 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

Former Member27/01/2019 12:16:45
724 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

leccyflyer27/01/2019 12:19:07
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1275 forum posts
302 photos

The trouble with the green fibreboard is that it doesn't hold a pin tightly, they are typically a wee bit sloppy and can move. Not the same grip as Sundeala. It's a shame, because it's much cheaper and easier to get hold of.

Former Member27/01/2019 12:26:56
724 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

kc27/01/2019 12:34:51
6056 forum posts
169 photos

One of the advantages of plasterboard is that in addition to taking pins well it is also easily possible to use screws to hold down difficult items like wing spars. The screws should preferably be modern screws which have sharper points than traditional and cut their way in easily. Use with simple wooden clips to hold down spars etc.

The plasterboard is cheap enough to replace if the screw holes are a bother or just a touch of Polyfilla etc could fill them. Offcuts of plasterboard are often thrown out by builders, a piece big enough for a wing is all we need, plus separate smaller bits for tailplanes etc.

Former Member27/01/2019 12:56:10
724 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

Outrunner27/01/2019 13:36:18
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42 forum posts
2 photos

Plasterboard every time, cheap, cuts to size with a knife, takes pins easily, you can draw on guide lines directly on the the board to build whatever over them. I seal the edges of the board with parcel tape.

Phil.

Ronaldo27/01/2019 14:24:24
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234 forum posts
17 photos

Along with many others on here ......' Plasterboard', ...... it's cheap to replace, takes pins well, and stays flat as long as its mounted on a true flat surface.

I've been building models many years, and used the sundeala type fibre boards before. I've found it twists and warps like %&*^%$*$^" if it's not nailed down to a true flat surface (and it can still slightly warp and lift in the center where it isn't nailed down !), where as with plasterboard it remains flat, you can simply lift off a worn out sheet, turn it over and use the other fresh side. When that's side's finished with, discard it and drop a new piece in it's place.

Ps ....... If like me, once you've used plasterboard you won't want to use anything else wink 2

Edited By Ronaldo on 27/01/2019 14:30:13

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