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How can I reverse a plan to build two wing halves

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Phil Horne08/02/2019 15:20:07
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9 forum posts
9 photos

i have the Moonglow plan but it only shows one wing panel. How can I get a reversed image of the plan to build the starboard wing. Is there a way of treating the paper so I can see through from the other side, therefore getting a mirror image?

jrman08/02/2019 15:28:37
332 forum posts
3 photos

If you rub the back of the plan with light oil (3in1) or paraffin it will be transluscent for quite a long period but if you can build quickly then cellulose thinners will be OK for a couple of days. If you don't like those ideas then tape it to a window and trace the key details onto the back. Thirdly take it to a print shop and get them to print a reverse image.

PatMc08/02/2019 15:31:43
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4126 forum posts
518 photos

A few drops of oil spread on the plan will make it semi transparent. Linseed oil or cooking oil are favourite.

Gordon Whitehead 108/02/2019 15:33:14
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293 forum posts
118 photos

It used to be said that rubbing the plan with paraffin will make it transluscent so that you can build on the back. Otherwise, it's not really too hard to trace the plan onto greaseproof paper and build on that, taking care to build the opposite wing of course. I've used the latter method a few times, but not the paraffin one.

Gordon

Robert Welford08/02/2019 15:46:45
152 forum posts
4 photos

Use carbon paper under plan and trace through - gives mirror image on reverse side!

Engine Doctor08/02/2019 16:08:32
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2205 forum posts
20 photos
Posted by Robert Welford on 08/02/2019 15:46:45:

Use carbon paper under plan and trace through - gives mirror image on reverse side!

I recently showed some carbon paper to a club member and they were amazed as they had never seen anything like it .

kc08/02/2019 16:40:14
5871 forum posts
168 photos

Actually all you really need for wing building is just the lines for the spars and LE & TE and lines for the ribs. No real detail is required so just trace those lines or draw on plain paper or the building board.

Phil Horne08/02/2019 17:30:52
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9 forum posts
9 photos

Thank you all for the advice, I’ll try the oil trick once I’ve built the first half 😊

Levanter08/02/2019 17:35:35
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857 forum posts
436 photos
Posted by kc on 08/02/2019 16:40:14:

Actually all you really need for wing building is just the lines for the spars and LE & TE and lines for the ribs. No real detail is required so just trace those lines or draw on plain paper or the building board.

+ 1 yes

As kc says. You only need one line for the ribs, choose inboard or outboard. One line for the leading edge where I would normally use the outside line so if there was any variation in the wood size it would not affect the planform. Likewise for the trailing edge. Really just a few lines on some blank paper. Much quicker, much cleaner, cheaper and no need to cause damage to the original.

Levanter

Robert Parker08/02/2019 17:53:28
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877 forum posts
1133 photos

Hi Phil,

I use baby oil lasts for quite a while and not so smelly, my workshop is in the house.

with the baby oil the paper becomes transparent and it is good for your hands too

Regards

Robert

Andy Sephton 108/02/2019 18:07:02
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149 forum posts
360 photos

If you use oil, don't forget to protect your building board and the model with some cling film or similar. I've used cooking oil in the past, when there was nothing else to hand, but on my latest model I'm using WD-40 - it's easy to spray on!

see pic number 5 in post number 6 in the following thread: https://www.modelflying.co.uk/forums/postings.asp?th=140631

Peter Miller08/02/2019 18:14:00
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9847 forum posts
1157 photos
10 articles

Parafin is best as the plan goes back to normal.

The other way is to take it to aprint shop and ask for a mirror image. No mess, no smell.

Martin Harris08/02/2019 18:51:33
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8478 forum posts
212 photos

Yes, I was quite amazed when I used the paraffin method as recommended in the instructions on my Airsail Chipmunk plan - I couldn't see any sign that it had been used when the plan dried out after I removed it from my building board.

Piers Bowlan08/02/2019 19:27:03
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1755 forum posts
42 photos

I can't believe what people are suggesting; paraffin, carbon paper, tracing paper, baby oil! Surely, as we live in the digital age, it easier to google 'commercial printers' (at least one in every town) and have a mirror image copy done of the wing. It will cost £2.50 tops. While you are at it attach a copy of the rear fuselage to the front and get them to do a copy of the complete fuselage. That way you will keep the originals pristine so that you can refer to it as the need arrises. It is what I have done with Peter's 'Little Miss Honky Tonk' plan, at any rate.

Martin Harris08/02/2019 19:47:14
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8478 forum posts
212 photos

You need to check that there is no distortion if you do this - I was caught out by a copy I had done by a commercial print shop which was significantly different to the original.

Geoff Sleath08/02/2019 20:23:47
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3239 forum posts
247 photos
Posted by Martin Harris on 08/02/2019 19:47:14:

You need to check that there is no distortion if you do this - I was caught out by a copy I had done by a commercial print shop which was significantly different to the original.

Quite. It might be better to get copies for both wings then they're more likely to be the same but check.

When we used to get prints done at work from microfilm on one of those smelly printers the message on all of then carried the message 'Do Not Scale'. It didn't matter to me because all my drawings were circuit diagrams but for mechanical drawings it meant read the dimensions marked rather than measure them with a scale because the paper isn't dimensionally stable in temperature or humidity.

Of course we aeromodellers have drawing with few marked dimensions and so use the drawings as jigs.

I don't always bother using the drawing for wings. I just draw a line and mark off the rib positions then use the actual drawing for reference for both wings but use my line for building on.

Geoff

Nigel R08/02/2019 20:37:55
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2731 forum posts
448 photos
Posted by Piers Bowlan on 08/02/2019 19:27:03:

It will cost £2.50 tops.

Squirt of WD40 costs pennies!

Anyway, surely on this forum we likes ye olde ways? wink

Jonathan M08/02/2019 21:01:52
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646 forum posts
272 photos

The mess-free method...

During daylight, tape to a large window and trace in pencil onto the back.

Use a 0.5mm propelling-pencil to mark accurately the outlines and at the junctions of each component, then you can use a normal pencil to roughly sketch in the rest so it all makes quick visual sense.

[back-to-front smiley]

stu knowles08/02/2019 21:04:00
541 forum posts
44 photos

Having once built from a plan which had both wings drawn - but which were slightly different sizes, I would advise always building the second wing from the reverse of the drawing used for the first wing.

Ray Wood 408/02/2019 21:10:13
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51 forum posts
6 photos

Dennis Bryant recommended taping the drawing to a window on a bright day and tracing the wing onto the back of the drawing, a sort of diy light box 😀

Regards Ray

Edited By Ray Wood 4 on 08/02/2019 21:10:51

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