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Acrowot build

Advise building the Acrowot

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Stephen clarke 310/02/2019 22:20:34
6 forum posts
I'm currently building my 1st Acrowot kit and wanted some advise on how to position the engine mount. Thanks in advance
kc11/02/2019 11:12:03
5802 forum posts
167 photos

Stephen, no replies so far- possibly because you posted late at night. But possibly because you didn't give all the info about which engine - 2 stroke or 4 stroke - etc. and which Acrowot.

Give some more info and I am sure you will get some sound advice.

I have an old Acrowot of the original 58 inch size which had an OS 46 two stroke and later re engined with an Enya 40SS 2 stroke and I could give details but there may be other people with exactly the same engine you have which may be more relevant.

Jon - Laser Engines11/02/2019 11:30:30
4329 forum posts
159 photos

The AW kit has the provision to move the firewall to suit your engine. All you need to do is work out how long your engine is with its mount and go from there. If in doubt plonk the engine+mount on the plan and see how it all lines up.

Glenn Philbrick11/02/2019 11:37:38
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223 forum posts
59 photos

dsc03973.jpgI assume you are building the kit and not an ARTF? The descision on the engine mount is weather to mount it side on or inverted, I have done both and find that side on is more convenient for starting but does mean quite a lot of the cowl side cheek is cut away. If you are using a big engine you ,may need to move the firewall back slightly and this is dealt with in the instructions. I have used a 91FS in most of mine. The undercarriage is the weakest link in all forms of Acro Wot so a bit of reinforcing around this area will help, but I do away with the metal fixings and replace them with 2x 6mm plastic bolts so that they break before ripping the undercarriage out. The Acro does tend to bounce a little on landing in any slight wind. If you make a spacer as shown then the bolts are easily removed to replace them. As far as other mods some have moved the tailplane lower to make knife edge easier I have tried this but wouldn't bother just need a bit of elevator to make it track straight.

Hope this helps.

dsc03972.jpg

ken anderson.11/02/2019 14:02:58
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8310 forum posts
768 photos

hello Stephen and welcome from me.the answer to your question is...which engine are you going to fit?2st or 4st...then is it going inverted .side ways of normal way up......if its a kit build...there are a few mods you can incorporate into the build as you go..... fire away with as many questions that you have...and check out via the search on the forum here there are a few Wot builders on here...

ken anderson...ne..1....A/Wot dept.

Stephen clarke 312/02/2019 10:06:24
6 forum posts
Thank you all as I'm new to building but it's the kit acrowot and not the artf. I'm putting a os 55 ax 2 stroke in. I'm just confused as to where the engine mount is positioned. Thanks
Stephen clarke 312/02/2019 10:16:54
6 forum posts
Thank you all as I'm new to building but it's the kit acrowot and not the artf. I'm putting a os 55 ax 2 stroke in. I'm just confused as to where the engine mount is positioned. Thanks
Stephen clarke 312/02/2019 10:19:25
6 forum posts
I will post pics of what ive done already at the end of this week. All advice and guidance is much appreciated
Stephen clarke 312/02/2019 10:23:10
6 forum posts
I have had the acrowot artf version with a TT 75 fs up front do I know how they fly but unfortunately due to dumb thumbs I crashed it. Hopefully get my kit built in time for summer
Tim Flyer12/02/2019 10:24:09
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884 forum posts
145 photos

The engine needs a couple of degrees of right thrust on the Acrowot. Chris Foss’s instructions have the angle . You can eithe use small fillets or buy the SLEC purpose built wedges. The important thing is to make sure that the spinner plate ends up central despite the right thrust. That means the rear of the engine is mounted slightly to one side. It can either be accomplished by eye ( taping a ruler down the centre of fuselage) or more accurately using trigonometry 😉.

Tim Flyer12/02/2019 10:33:01
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884 forum posts
145 photos

The AX 55 will be perfect by the way I’m using one at the moment in my kit Acrowot in my user picture

Jonathan M12/02/2019 11:56:22
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601 forum posts
267 photos
Posted by Stephen clarke 3 on 12/02/2019 10:16:54:
Thank you all as I'm new to building but it's the kit acrowot and not the artf. I'm putting a os 55 ax 2 stroke in. I'm just confused as to where the engine mount is positioned. Thanks

I will post pics of what ive done already at the end of this week. All advice and guidance is much appreciated

That would be of interest - I lost my own ARTF AW recently and am thinking of a kit version for the engine that survived.

I'd still be inclined to use nylon bolts for the U/C.

kc12/02/2019 12:53:16
5802 forum posts
167 photos

The problem with using nylon bolts for the undercarriage is that if they snap in a hard landing the u/c flys back and cuts two notches in the tailplane! At least that's what happened when the u/c was alloy. It was common to see those notches on lot's of Acrowots. People preferred to use steel bolts for that reason.

kc12/02/2019 13:04:18
5802 forum posts
167 photos

One of the oldest tips about building from kits is to draw around every part onto a sheet of paper before you start. Including the shape of the airfoil at root and tip if it's a foam wing. Then you have a plan for each component if you have any sort of crash a replacement part can easily be cut from balsa or ply or a foam wing made. That way any crash is probably repairable unless the model is too oil soaked. ARTF model can also be repaired see the 2 part article by Peter Miller under 'Features -  Building Technique ' at the top of this page.

Edited By kc on 12/02/2019 13:08:22

Jonathan M12/02/2019 13:23:06
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601 forum posts
267 photos

Good points KC.

Re the U/C, perhaps the nylon-bolt solution is only really applicable to the ARTF version, but less so on a more robustly made kit?

On my ARTF, before I switched away from the steel bolts supplied, a bloody great mole hill reared up right in front of a dead-stick landing - ripping off not just the U/C but the whole of the underside section to which it was bolted! In the several later occurrences of rough landings where the nylon sheered (sometimes just one side only), scarring of the tail didn't happen, but would have been a very minor price to pay compared to a nose-area rebuild.

Jon Laughton13/02/2019 10:39:49
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1119 forum posts
100 photos

Steve - after your message I left you a pm to contact me?

In the build there are generally recommended strengthening mods such as glassing the inside of the forward fuselage with light cloth from the rear of the firewall to the cockpit area, fixing the firewall with cocktail sticks and adding triangular gussets to the inside forward fuselage structure.

Acrowots are tough models anyway but these make sure it will stay in one piece forever (almost!). Personally I always used nylon bolts on mine to fix the u/c to the fuse but the points made here for and against both have merits so it is a matter of personal choice...call me to discuss more.

Jon

Stephen clarke 316/02/2019 09:02:24
6 forum posts
I'm after purchasing some glue. Where's the best place to purchase from also do I use z poxy or e poxy for the wrap around the wing. Thanks in advance
Percy Verance16/02/2019 12:36:09
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7385 forum posts
143 photos

Stephen

For the bandage wrapped round the wing I personally wouldn't use any epoxy type glues. I'd use Aliphatic resin glue. In fact that's what I'd use for the whole model. If you go on to cover the model with iron on film you'll find that it may not adhere too well to the epoxy on the wing bandage. There'd be no such issue with a bandage applied with Aliphatic as film covering sticks well to it. Be sure the wing bandage is wider than the fuselage Stephen.

Epoxy glues don't seep into the wood, but instead sit on the surface. They're also heavy .

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 16/02/2019 12:59:29

Jonathan M16/02/2019 13:57:07
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601 forum posts
267 photos

For construction generally I’d use Aliphatic Resin - dries quicker than PVA and is relatively easy to sand.

I’d use Poly-C for the bandage: **LINK**

If you do use epoxy for localised strengthening of components, then make sure the joining areas are well keyed (roughed up) first, and the slower and more liquid the better for maximum penetration. If the epoxy is to fill an area, then thicken it with filler when mixing.

Percy Verance16/02/2019 15:29:08
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7385 forum posts
143 photos

It's perhaps also worth adding that if you're going to use epoxy on a joint which has small gaps, then pop the bottles in the microwave for 20 seconds or so prior to mixing. It'll then run into gaps and cracks much more readily......it might also begin to penetrate the grain of the wood a bit. Not something it usually does in it's normal gloopy state.

Poly C would indeed be a good alternative, but it's thinner/runnier and so would need several more coats to build up it's strength if used with a wing joining bandage. Good stuff though. I use it myself.

 

 

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 16/02/2019 15:34:46

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