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Gone,but not forgotten kit mfg

when adds were interesting

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Andy Meade14/03/2019 09:03:09
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2558 forum posts
669 photos
Posted by Hugh P on 14/03/2019 08:35:25:

One from the archives. Skyways Chipahawk meet Keevil airfield, Wiltshire. Skyways owner Phil Durrant 4th from left. Happy days, wish I still had mine.smiley

chipahawk meet keevil 1984.jpg

Brilliant, where I flew for many of my teenage years yes I flew Mr Norris' (of Melksham Models) Chipahawk for a few years as a loaner, lovely aircraft.

Nightflyer14/03/2019 13:20:02
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173 forum posts

Ah good old Morley Helicopters. I wonder how many heli pilots cut their teeth on one of Jim's models. I think my first introduction as a teenager to helicopters - and the fine control required (in the mid 70's at least) was when two club members built Bell 47's and had a standing order for blade sets and battled to extract power and improved cooling for their engines. Of course this was before the onset of gyro's and the pilot dexterity became really highly developed.

jeff2wings14/03/2019 21:39:03
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762 forum posts
1789 photos

Nice seeing the Phil Ramsey Gladiator,had both mini-pitts and 1/4 scale one

mini-pitts

001 (26).jpg

Bowman's did take over the Olympic Sportsman,nice looking plane.

001 (21).jpg

one for the glider*st out there

001 (24).jpg

I think that people that are 'new' to the hobby,as in the last 15-20 years,would be surprised at the number of kits that were available from small mfg and shops in this country.

001 (27).jpg

 

Edited By jeff2wings on 14/03/2019 21:44:34

Bob Cotsford15/03/2019 10:58:32
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7828 forum posts
433 photos

Anyone remember the big St Leonards Models kits? There was a 120" thermal soarer, fibreglass fus and built up wing, was it the SuperNova? My first taste of what a good soarer was like.

Capt Kremen15/03/2019 12:41:02
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271 forum posts
78 photos

Yep, 'SuperNova' - Red G/F fuz and built up wings with two wire joiners, all-moving tailplane. Very good flat-field flier and off the slope too.

Nightflyer15/03/2019 12:45:20
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173 forum posts
Posted by Bob Cotsford on 15/03/2019 10:58:32:

Anyone remember the big St Leonards Models kits? There was a 120" thermal soarer, fibreglass fus and built up wing, was it the SuperNova? My first taste of what a good soarer was like.

Hi Bob,

Yes there were a few designs. I am not sure who the designer was IIRC it was Keith Panell who also was credited with the Alpha trainer model I mentioned in an earlier post, and the fuselage made by Brian Diss (also mentioned in an earlier post on here). Some local model shops produced some good model designs during the 70's and early 80's until ARTTF and Far East kit models got a good hold. I will have to look to see if I can find some of the old ads to add on here.

Tim Ruck who was in the Hastings club at the time produced a lovely trainer which was originally called the Cavalier. I had the third prototype model and learnt to fly with it. It survived a great many flights until it met with a fiery end because the wood was so oil soaked for the glue anymore.

Colin Carpenter15/03/2019 14:17:27
547 forum posts
35 photos

Ah yes ! Morley Helicopters ! Maurice Tait and I formed Bath Heli Club on 84/5 and I last saw him a few years ago living in Sherborne , Dorset . I flew (badly ) for Morley at shows in the 80's ! The Hughes flew well when set up , no doubt the weight helped ! They seemed easy in comparison to today's 3D choppers 😂😂 Colin

Stuart Quinn-Harvie 115/03/2019 16:07:30
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108 forum posts
81 photos

One of my best pals still has his Morley 47G - with floats completely unflown. It's hanging from his bedroom ceiling. Lovely piece of work, and looks much more "modelly": that is to say that HE made more of it, than modern helis. Lovely piece of kit: it's even got a very early mechanical gyro. He is rated on full size helis ( and pretty much everything else ) but was always JUST too nervous to fly this one.

Peter Christy15/03/2019 16:59:34
1427 forum posts

Still got my B47, and still going strong! (Built in the mid 80's IIRC!)

--

Pete

Stuart Quinn-Harvie 115/03/2019 17:29:58
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108 forum posts
81 photos

Oh I need to show this to Tim! Lovely! What spec are you flying her at?

Peter Christy15/03/2019 17:48:04
1427 forum posts
Posted by Stuart Quinn-Harvie 1 on 15/03/2019 17:29:58:

Oh I need to show this to Tim! Lovely! What spec are you flying her at?

Not quite sure what you are asking, but it is powered by the same Super-Tigre 40 that's been in it since I built it! A few years back I fitted new servos (JR) to replace the old Orion (don't ask!) ones that had served well for nearly 30 years! I also upgraded it to five servos - for the first 30 years it flew with a basic 4-channel aircraft radio, and one servo for both collective and throttle! It now has a basic gyro in as well, as my reactions aren't what they were 30-odd years ago! I'm using some K&S fibre-glass blades that I was given to try many years back. They are really the wrong rotation, but as they are symmetrical, it doesn't matter much!

It still flies very well!

--

Pete

Bob Cotsford15/03/2019 19:42:59
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7828 forum posts
433 photos
Posted by Capt Kremen on 15/03/2019 12:41:02:

Yep, 'SuperNova' - Red G/F fuz and built up wings with two wire joiners, all-moving tailplane. Very good flat-field flier and off the slope too.

'two wire joiners' - it always looked about ready to clap hands on a windy day going up at the end of a bungee, there was a definite un-clenching moment when it finally released!

PatMc15/03/2019 20:03:48
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4145 forum posts
518 photos
Posted by Nightflyer on 15/03/2019 12:45:20:
Posted by Bob Cotsford on 15/03/2019 10:58:32:

Anyone remember the big St Leonards Models kits? There was a 120" thermal soarer, fibreglass fus and built up wing, was it the SuperNova? My first taste of what a good soarer was like.

Hi Bob,

Yes there were a few designs. I am not sure who the designer was IIRC it was Keith Panell who also was credited with the Alpha trainer model I mentioned in an earlier post, and the fuselage made by Brian Diss (also mentioned in an earlier post on here). Some local model shops produced some good model designs during the 70's and early 80's until ARTTF and Far East kit models got a good hold. I will have to look to see if I can find some of the old ads to add on here.

Tim Ruck who was in the Hastings club at the time produced a lovely trainer which was originally called the Cavalier. I had the third prototype model and learnt to fly with it. It survived a great many flights until it met with a fiery end because the wood was so oil soaked for the glue anymore.

The St Leonards Models Super Nova was designed by Jim Baguley. There were 2 versions, 100" & 124" span, both with the same all wood fuselage. The wings were a terrible design structurally & much of the kit contents were poor quality. Despite having a side of the boot & ruler wing section it was a good floater & could put up quite a good performance - if it could be towed up without the wings folding. I built a redesigned wing for mine (124" version) using an Eppler section after the wings folded during the tow in a BARCS competition.
I saw un-coloured fibre glass SN fuselages for sale at a couple of BARCS comps, I think by Mike Proctor. There may have been more after market FG fuselages being made but AFAIK St Leonards kits were all wood.

St Leonards Models also made a slope soarer kit, the Twister. This had a 6ft span symmetrical section wing with virtually identical fuselage to the SN. I bought the kit from my LMS at a give away price when he was getting rid of old stock - but just for the plentiful supply of wood in the box.
I believe Jim Baguley was a well respected FF comp modeller in his day but the Twister would never have cut the mustard as a slope aerobat.

David Davis15/03/2019 20:03:52
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3326 forum posts
575 photos
Posted by Bob Cotsford on 15/03/2019 10:58:32:

Anyone remember the big St Leonards Models kits? There was a 120" thermal soarer, fibreglass fus and built up wing, was it the SuperNova? My first taste of what a good soarer was like.

My first radio controlled model aircraft in 1988, was a St Leonard's Models "Gemini." It was a 50" trainer powered by an Irvine 19 car racing engine and guided by a Sanwa Conquest radio.I built it as a three channel model but ailerons were an option. It was too fast for me as a beginner so I built a Junior 60 and put both into engine and radio into that.

I kept the plan and in 2016 built a four-channel version powered by an electric motor. I gave it to a clubmate.

finished gemini 1.jpg

stu knowles15/03/2019 20:14:59
547 forum posts
44 photos

This ad cropped up in a thread on here a while ago. I have an unflown Cutlass from this kit in the garage,

img_8345.jpg

PatMc15/03/2019 20:16:21
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4145 forum posts
518 photos
Posted by Bob Cotsford on 15/03/2019 19:42:59:
Posted by Capt Kremen on 15/03/2019 12:41:02:

Yep, 'SuperNova' - Red G/F fuz and built up wings with two wire joiners, all-moving tailplane. Very good flat-field flier and off the slope too.

'two wire joiners' - it always looked about ready to clap hands on a windy day going up at the end of a bungee, there was a definite un-clenching moment when it finally released!

Actually there were 3 wires, all in brass tubes - a 10SWG fixed to a spruce reinforcing spar that was fixed to the LE, another 10SWG between spruce reinforcing pieces fixed to the main spar & a 16swg incidence keeper just ahead of the TE. The 10 swg wires in my kit were loose fits in the tubes - so loose that I sourced tubes that fitted before I built the model.

Andrew Ray15/03/2019 20:32:52
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698 forum posts
19 photos
Posted by Bob Cotsford on 15/03/2019 10:58:32:

Anyone remember the big St Leonards Models kits? There was a 120" thermal soarer, fibreglass fus and built up wing, was it the SuperNova? My first taste of what a good soarer was like.

Jim Baguely of free flight fame. I don't remember the fibreglass fuselage but I am building a 124" one with the wooden fuselage and changing the wing joiner to a flat steel strip, I thought the design was quite clever, very light with the 1/16" x 1/2" spruce spars at the surface butted up to the D box sheeting The free flight heritage very much evident in the design.

So, how about Soaron Sailplanes, Sunshine, Shillouette, Pik 20 and a few others I can't remember, designed buy Roy Garner.

PatMc15/03/2019 21:42:24
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4145 forum posts
518 photos
Posted by Andrew Ray on 15/03/2019 20:32:52:
Posted by Bob Cotsford on 15/03/2019 10:58:32:

Anyone remember the big St Leonards Models kits? There was a 120" thermal soarer, fibreglass fus and built up wing, was it the SuperNova? My first taste of what a good soarer was like.

Jim Baguely of free flight fame. I don't remember the fibreglass fuselage but I am building a 124" one with the wooden fuselage and changing the wing joiner to a flat steel strip, I thought the design was quite clever, very light with the 1/16" x 1/2" spruce spars at the surface butted up to the D box sheeting The free flight heritage very much evident in the design.

Andrew, the 1/16 x 1/4 spruce spars are not up to the job, they rely on the vertical 1/16 balsa webs. Trouble is the wings flex under load which stresses the joints between the web & spar. There just isn't enough glue area on these joints [also I suspect the glue doesn't penetrate such a thin spruce edge] This can result in the webs becoming popping of the spars which are too thin to take the stress so collapse.

David Davis16/03/2019 08:55:18
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3326 forum posts
575 photos

Ah, Sailplanes International didn't it start to produce i/c powered models under the name Powerplanes International? I recall fancying the Maule Luna Rocket stocked by a model shop in Barnstaple but someone else bought the kit before I had saved enough money to buy it. **LINK**

There was a plan several year's ago called Negative G if memory serves, which looked like the same aircraft to me. Alternatively I could buy an ARTF today, but that's not the same of course. blush **LINK**

P.S. I used to have a Detroit Custom Cruiser too. Didn't like its flying characteristics that much so sold it on.

Edited By David Davis on 16/03/2019 08:58:29

Andrew Ray16/03/2019 09:49:12
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698 forum posts
19 photos

I don't agree PatMc, the spars are actually 1/16" x 1/2", doubled up to 1/16" x 1" at the root with the webbing fitting between the spars. It is a lightweight soarer as were many of the designs of the day perfectly adequate for the designed use. It was supplied with tissue for covering and is what it was. I saw a few models of the day folding wings due to over exuberant use, they were perfectly fine otherwise. Do you remember the Wildflekken? Put the nose down in a dive and the model would tuck under as the washout twisted the wing and not a cheap model in the day.

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