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Cover or Overlap

Using covering film with a second colour.

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Stearman6510/03/2019 16:42:33
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Just started covering my Pilatus with Oracover. Using a combination of red & white Oracover. Where the red meets the white would you overlap the red onto the white, or fully cover in white then add red trim on top of the white, & what technique would you use. Or do it another way?

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ken anderson.10/03/2019 17:23:21
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i'd probably cover the lot in white then add the strips of red...….

ken anderson...ne...1....red stripes dept.

Geoff Peacock10/03/2019 17:25:42
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The red on the fuselage/nose is Solarfilm (RIP), which just overlaps the white film by about 1/4". The red maple leaf on the wing is Solartrim, all of it on top of the white film (also Solarfilm). No problems to fit and no 'show-through'.

Hope that helps.

Engine Doctor10/03/2019 17:42:34
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Some arfts are done in separate pieces but for the weight and time saved I would definitely cover in white then add the red trimming.

john stones 110/03/2019 17:49:32
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If I had the ability/accuracy I would overlap, not getting bubbles in is nigh on impossible, if I cover over a base film.

Peter Jenkins10/03/2019 18:20:19
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I used overlap when covering my Gangster 75. I cut the film to shape using plates and oval platters (!). Worked OK most of the time provided I didn't linger with the heat source and cause too much shrinking.

Gangster 86.jpg

A friend lent me a Top Flite Woodpecker which he swears by but which I didn't use except for the small amount of film on film that I used. You need to use the tool on the glue side of the film and give it a good going over. As you press it down the air escapes through the pin pricks and then iron flat. I used an iron to tack the edges of the film and then a heat gun and a film glove (got it in the US but JP does something similar) and that worked out fine.

Stearman6510/03/2019 22:34:43
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Posted by Peter Jenkins on 10/03/2019 18:20:19:

I used overlap when covering my Gangster 75. I cut the film to shape using plates and oval platters (!). Worked OK most of the time provided I didn't linger with the heat source and cause too much shrinking.

Gangster 86.jpg

A friend lent me a Top Flite Woodpecker which he swears by but which I didn't use except for the small amount of film on film that I used. You need to use the tool on the glue side of the film and give it a good going over. As you press it down the air escapes through the pin pricks and then iron flat. I used an iron to tack the edges of the film and then a heat gun and a film glove (got it in the US but JP does something similar) and that worked out fine.

Hi Peter

Thanks for the detailed reply, never heard of a woodpecker before, for that matter a film glove either, but being as I don't possess a heat gun I can't see me using one of those. Checked the link for the WP but they are OOS, being as TF has gone over to the dark side, it may be a lost product. If anyone has one they want to sell, I'm interested, in the mean time I'll do another search. Thanks again.

Regs Eric

yes

Peter Jenkins10/03/2019 23:03:26
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132 photos

You really ought to get a heat gun. They are fairly cheap and ver useful. Other uses are on shrinking heat shrink - I probably use it more for that than tightening covering or, as here, for sticking down film quickly over a large area without causing bubbling.

Stearman6510/03/2019 23:24:32
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Hi Peter

I appreciate what you say, but I don't really have the room to use a heat gun in, I'm struggling as it is. I'd have to tidy away everything on the bench before using it. I covered dozens of models using everything possible from tissue, nylon, film & tex but never used a heat gun. You may have read I burned my fingers accidentally just picking up the iron rest today, I'd probably burn the flat down with a heat gun. Thanks anyway. BTW the TF Woodpecker isn't made anymore as I thought. What I have found was a dressmakers perforated wheel on Ebay for a couple of quid, so I'll see how I go on when it arrives.

Peter Jenkins10/03/2019 23:48:08
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132 photos

Thanks for the update on the Woodpecker. I'll stick with borrowing my friends if I need to stick film on film. I also use Oratrim and that is best applied wet with a mild detergent solution to stop the film catching. You can slide it around till it's in the right place and then use something like a credit card to squeegee out the water and that sticks it down for good.

Ron Gray11/03/2019 07:41:45
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The woodpecker is available here **LINK** I bought mine a while back and find it very useful when covering film on film or film on sheet balsa / ply. The idea is that it gives the air somewhere to go, just run it over the area to be covered (not too sure about running it over the glue side of the film Peter?) then apply covering film as normal, result is no air bubbles.

Peter Miller11/03/2019 08:30:56
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On the initial question. I cover all in white and then the trim over it.

I saw the woodpecker in a magazine many years ago. From what I saw you use itto makethe little perforations in the wood and any film that will be underneath the next layer. I don't see that you could do that using the tool on the adhesive side of the film

Ron Gray11/03/2019 09:13:00
1432 forum posts
359 photos

My thoughts too Peter.

A word of caution though, if using it on open structures don’t overdo it as the film may split when applying the over film and may show through.

Edited By Ron Gray on 11/03/2019 09:16:18

Nigel R11/03/2019 09:27:41
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2987 forum posts
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White base, self adhesive trim over the top. Use dilute washing up liquid when applying trim, "float" the trim on. Smooth out the air bubbles while it is wet - no pinholes required. Plus a careful bit of ironing when the trim needs to tuck into hinge gaps, etc.

I've not tried using iron on for trim.

Stearman6511/03/2019 10:28:00
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Posted by Ron Gray on 11/03/2019 07:41:45:

The woodpecker is available here **LINK** I bought mine a while back and find it very useful when covering film on film or film on sheet balsa / ply. The idea is that it gives the air somewhere to go, just run it over the area to be covered (not too sure about running it over the glue side of the film Peter?) then apply covering film as normal, result is no air bubbles.

Bit the bullet & bought the one in the link which turned out to be SMC, although it's a bit of a rip off. It's advertised in the US at $14.50 but no stock anywhere, the cost from SMC £22.49 inc vat & carriage & it was the last one, still it might become a collectors item?

Stearman6511/03/2019 10:31:03
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Posted by Ron Gray on 11/03/2019 09:13:00:

My thoughts too Peter.

A word of caution though, if using it on open structures don’t overdo it as the film may split when applying the over film and may show through.

Edited By Ron Gray on 11/03/2019 09:16:18

Hi Ron, Don't have a problem with open structures, only warps. So wouldn't use it that way.

Edited By Stearman65 on 11/03/2019 10:32:16

Stearman6511/03/2019 10:36:45
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When I couldn't find a woodpecker, I searched & found this & ordered one. Now I've ordered a woodpecker as well, this should come in handy for small bubbles.

**LINK**

Ron Gray11/03/2019 10:51:27
1432 forum posts
359 photos

You may want to use it on open structures when applying film on film, to help prevent air bubbles! Be careful when using single row perforating wheels as they can go straight through film, just like a knife!

Peter Jenkins11/03/2019 12:06:36
1234 forum posts
132 photos
Posted by Peter Miller on 11/03/2019 08:30:56:

On the initial question. I cover all in white and then the trim over it.

I saw the woodpecker in a magazine many years ago. From what I saw you use itto makethe little perforations in the wood and any film that will be underneath the next layer. I don't see that you could do that using the tool on the adhesive side of the film

Hi Peter, my reasoning for using it on the adhesive side of the film is that any trapped air needs to exit through the top layer of film rather than try and exit through the underlying wood sheeting. I cannot really see much point in using the woodpecker on sheet wood even though that's what they say in the instructions. The other point is that it is easier to iron down a dimple with a hole in it rather than rely on shrinkage pulling the dimple in the film tight but maybe still leaving a small hole.

I might be wrong but perforating from the adhesive side has worked very well for me and leaves no marks on the finished covering. Perhaps both are equally good but the one time I used the woodpecker on the glossy side of the film I was left with very slight, but noticeable, marks on the top surface. Maybe it's just the way I used it but it never happened when I perforated from the adhesive side.

Peter Miller11/03/2019 12:15:52
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I have never seen an actual Woodpecker, let alone used one.I was going by the original article I read back in the 80s???

I fnd that a pin will puncture the average bubble quite well. But then I can't claim to produce concourse finishes. For those I used to use dope and sanding sealer ans tissue over balsa and hours of work but was only on the occasional model.

Then sanding sealer and spray paint on the desktop models that I used to make for a few years.

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