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Castor oil in 4 stroke engines

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Jason Channing18/03/2019 21:18:34
79 forum posts

Hi Jon . I can assure you that My Engines can run past optimum mixture and they do not not cut out , but they will run very hot, sizzling hot.luckily these are only My old engines when playing around with them and showing My son how not to tune engines.

Chris Walby18/03/2019 21:41:05
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907 forum posts
220 photos

Run a 2 stroke lean for a moment on methanol , no problem after this one we moved to 4 strokes and never looked back.

Only needed new piston. rod, liner, small end, big end and main bearings and shaking the loose bits out of the exhaust! Pulling the bits of ring imbedded in the head and the crankcases out, we didn't bother.

piston.jpg

Jon - Laser Engines18/03/2019 23:41:34
4569 forum posts
168 photos
Posted by Jason Channing on 18/03/2019 21:18:34:

Hi Jon . I can assure you that My Engines can run past optimum mixture and they do not not cut out , but they will run very hot, sizzling hot.luckily these are only My old engines when playing around with them and showing My son how not to tune engines.

They wont. if the RPM hasnt dropped off then you arent past optimum. If the rpm has dropped and its still running then its clearly in a bad way as the rpm has dropped off. The point i was getting at is you cant run an engine lean and still get maximum performance. A lean engine will always stop in pretty short order.

Chris, many engines simply cant dissipate the heat they generate fast enough. They dont have to be 'lean' to cause the sort of damage you see there. Heli and car engines are the most vulnerable to that sort of thing.

extra slim19/03/2019 10:52:44
443 forum posts
48 photos

Good chat, one parameter not mentioned is Oil "thickness/viscosity".. There appears to be a consensus on Oil percentages, but from experience of testing a little for a manufacturer the viscosity, I think measured in centistokes proved an interesting exercise. My two strokes loved the "thin" fuel, heli and fixed wing applications, whereas my four strokes ran hot and weak on the thin stuff (bar my YS engines), and my saito and OS four strokes much preferred the medium viscosity.. so I guess viscosity is an important factor together with oil %age..

J D 819/03/2019 11:38:50
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1119 forum posts
65 photos

sam_0448.jpg This piston came from my trialing competition Land Rover, The result of to much heat and rev's. Much like the one above. Fueling would have been fine as it is from a diesel.

Jon - Laser Engines19/03/2019 12:29:24
4569 forum posts
168 photos
Posted by extra slim on 19/03/2019 10:52:44:

Good chat, one parameter not mentioned is Oil "thickness/viscosity".. There appears to be a consensus on Oil percentages, but from experience of testing a little for a manufacturer the viscosity, I think measured in centistokes proved an interesting exercise. My two strokes loved the "thin" fuel, heli and fixed wing applications, whereas my four strokes ran hot and weak on the thin stuff (bar my YS engines), and my saito and OS four strokes much preferred the medium viscosity.. so I guess viscosity is an important factor together with oil %age..

Quite true, not all oils are created equal. I tend to recommend avoiding the thin ones in our engines but to be honest the viscosity is only half the story as it comes down to the film strength.

Whatever the oil is in the aspen2 petrol is really good. very thin but it sticks to everything and seems to polish to a shine. I keep meaning to ask them what it is and see if it will mix with methanol. If so there is no reason not to use it at the same ratio as i do in the petrol engine. 2% oil glow engines, anyone fancy that?

Martin Harris19/03/2019 16:43:46
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8478 forum posts
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I thought that perceived wisdom was that petrol has a lubricity that methanol doesn't have. Would the percentage not need to be slightly greater for glow or is it another old wives' tale?

michael kuss19/03/2019 18:02:37
9 forum posts

Hi Jon , without starting a oil war does the klotz kl-200 pass the test in the Laser engines ? I have one of the 100 singles and a 200 & 360 twin if that makes any difference .Other than cool power the klotz is about the easiest for me to get . Cheers

ASH.20/03/2019 18:31:19
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269 forum posts

Reading all the posts above I think I'm being converted to fully synthetic (I am so easily swayed embarrassed). But no, I cannot give up totally on castor just yet! It not only helps me to sleep better but castor vapour soothes the olfactory nerve with nostalgia..

Does anyone know or have any info on ML70? I'm thinking of switching from Klotz.

Also, what's the best way to remove carbon without dismantling and grinding?

As to the varnish mentioned above, I've seen photos of brown stain coating on engine cylinder &piston which had only been run on fully synthetic.

No info on oil on Aspen website - *LINK*

Don Fry20/03/2019 19:39:06
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3451 forum posts
40 photos

ASH, what might work, is heat the engine to high temperatures, say 400, 500 ° C, and flood it with oxygen, or chlorine. That would burn it off. Apart from that, nothing much touches carbon

Edited By Don Fry on 20/03/2019 19:39:42

ASH.20/03/2019 20:24:55
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269 forum posts

What about cooking it in antifreeze in a crockpot? It's a age old recipe which people say works. I just don't want to discolour or affect the aluminium and other metals. Any ideas -anyone?

The chlorine is interesting.. I will have to experiment.

 

Edited By ASH. on 20/03/2019 20:29:43

Doc Marten20/03/2019 20:31:47
233 forum posts
2 photos

Carb cleaner for carbon and Cellulose thinner for varnish build up. Boiling in Antifreeze is likely to affect the colour of the alloy as others have found.

Edited By Doc Marten on 20/03/2019 20:35:31

Jon - Laser Engines20/03/2019 21:21:48
4569 forum posts
168 photos
Posted by Martin Harris on 19/03/2019 16:43:46:

I thought that perceived wisdom was that petrol has a lubricity that methanol doesn't have. Would the percentage not need to be slightly greater for glow or is it another old wives' tale?

In the case of a 2 stroke there is some truth, but in the case of a 4 stroke its nonsense as there is never any fuel in th crankcase, only oil.

Michael, KL200 is fine. 15% of that will be plenty

ASH, carbon removal is pretty much a mechanical process im afraid

Martin Harris20/03/2019 21:41:42
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8478 forum posts
212 photos
Posted by ASH. on 20/03/2019 18:31:19:

Does anyone know or have any info on ML70? I'm thinking of switching from Klotz.

I believe it's the oil used by Southern Modelcraft which I've used since 2002 with excellent results. The 10% nitro mix that I use in virtually all my engines does contain 2% castor (and 15% ML70) and I haven't suffered from any noticeable carbon build up or varnishing.

Edited By Martin Harris on 20/03/2019 21:50:59

J D 820/03/2019 22:46:44
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1119 forum posts
65 photos

ASH, Leave the chlorine alone, it strips old castor alright, also does a pretty good job of etching the casing as well. Guess how I know this.

ASH.20/03/2019 23:45:50
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269 forum posts

Thanks JD8, I'll give chlorine a miss.

I have used Cillit Bang and non scratch scourer with good success on silencers with burnt on oil. But how to get to valve stem and exhaust chamber? Halfords may have something.

Doc Marten21/03/2019 09:08:17
233 forum posts
2 photos
Posted by ASH. on 20/03/2019 23:45:50:

Thanks JD8, I'll give chlorine a miss.

Halfords may have something.

Yes they do have something, Carb cleaner and cellulose thinner.

Tim Flyer21/03/2019 09:45:07
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961 forum posts
158 photos

Strongest stuff I would put near an aluminium engine would be carb cleaner . Chlorine reacts rather vigorously with aluminium . By the way much of the trouble on glow engines with weakening the mixture too far is from pre-ignition which can become detonation rather than the smooth combustion process we want ...hence all the heat and shock damage . Detonation shocks the engine causes massive heat build up. With glow engines and diesel, ignition timing is controlled by the mixture( as well as compression) . Leaner advances it and richer retards it. Lower compression also retards ignition( that’s why on some engines we need to lower compression for very high nitro fuel)

Doc Marten21/03/2019 10:26:12
233 forum posts
2 photos
Posted by Tim Flyer on 21/03/2019 09:45:07:

Strongest stuff I would put near an aluminium engine would be carb cleaner . Chlorine reacts rather vigorously with aluminium . By the way much of the trouble on glow engines with weakening the mixture too far is from pre-ignition which can become detonation rather than the smooth combustion process we want ...hence all the heat and shock damage . Detonation shocks the engine causes massive heat build up. With glow engines and diesel, ignition timing is controlled by the mixture( as well as compression) . Leaner advances it and richer retards it. Lower compression also retards ignition( that’s why on some engines we need to lower compression for very high nitro fuel)

Also, too high a current on the plug making it too hot advances the ignition which makes the engine bite when hand starting.

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