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Matt's renaissance build

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Matt Storey 127/03/2019 13:15:38
25 forum posts
23 photos

Hi all,

I've been watching this with great interest, especially after buying the RCME July 18 edition with the free plan.

A few points to note:

  • I got back into flying last year after a 20yr break - now 37.
  • I bought the magazine as part of my journey back into the hobby
  • I soon after bought a Chris Foss Uno Wot - my first balsa build since my teens
  • I've never built from plan before
  • Now an electric convert
  • I've simply ordered my wood from SLEC and and copying/cutting from the plans. No short kit for me!

So, having seen the mass build was to be Renaissance, i was fairly excited to see others start their builds and to learn this.

I actually started on the 1st March although have only now decided i will share my progress/experience and add some pics.

In fact, my fuselage is nearly complete - i'll post some pics up later.

Some things i have learnt:

  • Fuselage sheeting - i used 2.4mm for this. As i'm going electric, i was tempted to go 1.6mm. I still think this would have worked and working the wood would have also been easier.
  • Tailplane - I have modded from the plans slightly and gone for a 'squared off' look. I also built the horizontal stab as a single piece - this ensures strength
  • Tailfin - I've noticed some are building the base of this to sit on top of the soft shaped block. Instead i cut the bottom of the bottom to be flush onto the stab. This means that the soft balsa blocks fit along the sides of the fin and provide a more rigid mating surface.
  • As vibration and fuel proofing won't be an issue, but cooling is, i've used liteply throughout the fuse. I'm also opening up lighting holes in the formers, ribs etc, thus reducing the overall weight and increasing airflow around the ESC and lipo.
  • Probably going to install the ESC on the motor mount. The lipo will be where the fuel tank sits using velcro straps. Also attaching the hatch using hinges and a quick release system for fast and easy access.

About to move onto the wing construction and likely to use flaperons with hoerner wingtips to help low speed stability.

Nothing like diving straight in!

Matt

Chris Walby27/03/2019 15:11:57
avatar
927 forum posts
222 photos

Welcome aboard, please post some photos so we can catch up!

Nice ideas there Matt, pity I am further down the road, but I'll see if I can add a few in wink

If its electric and you can get the C of G I think it will fly slow anyway, but it will be interesting how it preforms.

Are you keeping the dihedral?

Matt Storey 127/03/2019 16:39:10
25 forum posts
23 photos

Battery placement will be crucial to the CG issue.

The only concern i have with using the fuel tank space is that it won't counter balance the tail strongly enough and therefore lead weights will be needed. I want to avoid that as the aim is to keep the weight as low as possible. That will help keep the stall speed low.

The problem is that a 4 stroke 0.52 would be circa 500g. The motor i am looking at is a 4Max 5055-595 weighing in at 300g. The lipo adds more weight at 450 grams, but this is closer to the CG point potentially reducing its effect.

One idea i am toying with is to create a square opening from the engine firewall (F1) to inside the motor mount. The battery would slide forward into this 'box' space allowing fine tuning of the CG.

I'm keeping the dihedral at the designed angle. Its a decent sized fuselage meaning a bit of weight above the CG point. I want to maintain lateral stability and it also looks better with it.

Matt Storey 127/03/2019 20:14:18
25 forum posts
23 photos

6ff11313-e899-4d66-bbed-bca224552ae2.jpeg9213231f-3c1d-4404-b7b3-9d4e96b0e1b4.jpeg77bb6c7e-65fd-4d32-9135-0b5e890ff8db.jpeg2fd16a02-7c17-47ce-81c2-737d21fec461.jpeg

Ramblin gruntfuttock27/03/2019 21:22:34
avatar
29 forum posts
16 photos

Welcome Matt. Looking good and i admire you for doing your own cut outs. There is a wealth of experience doing the build and the folks are very helpful, i am learning all the time and look forward to learning more from yourself

Cheers

Jim

Trevor28/03/2019 07:46:12
avatar
355 forum posts
51 photos

It is indeed looking good. Not sure about the heat treatment it appears to be about to undergo though devil

Trevor

Matt Storey 128/03/2019 12:10:45
25 forum posts
23 photos

Thanks, Jim

And yes, Trevor, true that! Only a few places i can mock up the aircraft in my house. This was stealthily taken whilst my wife was in the living room..

To be honest, the light from the hood is quite useful in seeing defects. I normally build plastic kits and often take pics of finished models there.

Next up is joining the elevators and cutting out the wing ribs.

Piers Bowlan28/03/2019 14:44:31
avatar
1771 forum posts
42 photos

Great workmanship Matt, thanks for sharing. yes

Personally I would not fit the flaperons you mentioned in your OP. They increase the likelihood of a tip stall and spin, which can really ruin ones day at low level on the approach! Separate flaps and ailerons are a great idea however and you can operate both flaps from one servo if you want to keep the weight down (or two if you are not bothered).

Just my 2p worth.

Matt Storey 128/03/2019 16:04:56
25 forum posts
23 photos

Thanks Piers - good advice and much appreciated.

 

There are few points I've considered with flaperons vs split aileron/flap.

  • Separate route means either four servos or bell cranks/torque rods - more complexity for the build
  • Also means reduced aileron authority with a smaller span, although i could compensate with a deeper control surface. Again means alteration to the design.
  • Flaperons can be retrofitted and removed simply by programming the transmitter.
  • I may add small vortex generators to the outer portion of the wing to help low speed performance - not sure of the exact effect on small model, although there is online research demonstrating benefits
  • Only plan to use once i'm fully confident of the models performance and would only start by experimenting at altitude. If it became difficult to control - no more flaperons!

Edited By Matt Storey 1 on 28/03/2019 16:06:01

Piers Bowlan30/03/2019 09:18:22
avatar
1771 forum posts
42 photos

A few thoughts on flaps... Use of full span 'strip' ailerons on model aircraft is partly historical. Servos were once very expensive, big and heavy so it made sense to use one and operate both ailerons via torque rods or bell cranks, if you didn't mind the complication or the inevitable slop in the linkages. Most full sized aircraft don't have full span ailerons for the simple reason that it is the outer portion that causes most of the rolling motion. The inboard section will be less efficient and contribute to drag. Like you say, Increasing the chord or deflection will be an effective fix. Making the ailerons extend across two thirds of the wing span and the flaps occupying the central third, will hopefully provide a respectable roll rate while the flaps will be large enough to create drag to control the approach and reduce the landing roll.

Hoerner wingtips and vortex generators - fun to do, look nice, but how effective will they be at model sizes so, is it worth the effort?

Matt Storey 130/03/2019 21:31:40
25 forum posts
23 photos

Thanks Peirs - All valid points!

My next build is a Telemaster 40 which I want to go super STOL on - Separate flaps amongst others.

The flaperon idea is mainly a ‘why not’ as it means minimal change from the plan; bearing in mind this is my first plan build!

When I build scale plastic models, i frequently scratch build details and use resin/photo etch. It an obsession really - the need to add fine detail, even if only I know about it!

the wingtip idea is an example of this. Yes, it will mean more work, but it will look good, allow me to learn more and why not!

i saw this video in my research for the Telemaster:

**LINK**

The generators do allow the airflow on the outer wing to remain attached in high AOA or low speed. It will be small improvements, but again why not.

For me, this is key to the hobby, to be imanginative and create something unique. Definitely worth the extra effort, even if the performance is similar.

Matt Storey 130/03/2019 21:40:19
25 forum posts
23 photos

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Matt Storey 130/03/2019 21:42:34
25 forum posts
23 photos

Wing ribs done..

copied from a master and cut out with a scroll saw. Also used permagrit to shape all and create the spar slots.

I was going to add lightening holes, but can’t decide if it’s worth it?!

Matt Storey 107/04/2019 13:57:51
25 forum posts
23 photos

So, big learning point for me on the wing.

Sheet the underside first and then the top, otherwise it can very easily develop a warp.

Had the port wing done and even added a 6mm block for washout. Ended up with the wing drooped down instead!

Now have the top stripped and sanded ready for new sheeting.

Will put this down to first time inexperience and Friday evening beer...

Matt Storey 108/04/2019 22:37:31
25 forum posts
23 photos

351d8e16-4954-449d-8d02-36ef4c392426.jpegfdcee701-67ea-4d4c-9ff0-088658ffc938.jpegfcd1f159-a3ba-4515-9c5c-a48c2fbcf9a4.jpeg

Edited By Matt Storey 1 on 08/04/2019 22:38:03

Matt Storey 108/04/2019 22:41:25
25 forum posts
23 photos

Latest developments..

 

wing has been ‘corrected’ (!) and now has the right angle of washout. Will finish more sheeting and the leading/trailing edges tomorrow. I teach air cadets on Tuesdays/Fridays so a good opp to get them involved too.

 

Also started to consider the split flap and aileron route. Toying with adding a 50mm trading edge to achieve this but. It sure. Hmmm...!!

Edited By Matt Storey 1 on 08/04/2019 23:10:16

tony oneill 109/04/2019 08:53:53
68 forum posts
49 photos

hi matt, looking good. would it be possible for you to post some pictures of the center section of the wing? mines seems to have went a bit wonky so it would be good to get a look at another before I go any further.

regards

tony.

Matt Storey 109/04/2019 11:08:16
25 forum posts
23 photos

Thanks Tony

 

Yes, happy to do so when back home. I've yet to sheet this, and my wing seemed wonky as well, although i put this down to sheeting the top first on the port side. I removed this sheeting and so that it was only on the bottom of the wing and remained flexible. the top sheeting then went on and i used numerous magazines to apply generous pressure along the whole wing - one at a time. This completely cured the warped/twist and it now appears to be completely accurate.

 

Quite happy it is to, considering its my first built up wing.

 

I'll take pics of the rest of the sheeting process and also how i seal up the joins.

 

Cheers

Edited By Matt Storey 1 on 09/04/2019 11:09:29

Matt Storey 112/04/2019 12:29:38
25 forum posts
23 photos
Posted by tony oneill 1 on 09/04/2019 08:53:53:

hi matt, looking good. would it be possible for you to post some pictures of the center section of the wing? mines seems to have went a bit wonky so it would be good to get a look at another before I go any further.

regards

tony.

Think i had spotted that you have worked out the issue here, but here is my take on the wing. I ignored the dotted line on the plans and went to the drawn layout. That said, i did this after cutting half or the hard balsa spars... In the end, i figured that the ply spar brace had enough material attached to ensure adequate strength.

15e8cb38-de6f-453e-b380-bfab5cea0ac6.jpeg

 

Now have the wing complete and bolted to the fuselage. I used 6mm carbon rod instead of dowel. All epoxied in place.

Currently trying to decide if i add the upturned hoerner tips. Quite like the clipped look!

 

8c043018-93ab-4f1e-b3dd-dbb4bf822793.jpeg

 

 

Edited By Matt Storey 1 on 12/04/2019 12:31:29

Martin Harris12/04/2019 14:09:05
avatar
8556 forum posts
214 photos
Posted by Matt Storey 1 on 28/03/2019 16:04:56:

Thanks Piers - good advice and much appreciated.

There are few points I've considered with flaperons vs split aileron/flap.

  • Separate route means either four servos or bell cranks/torque rods - more complexity for the build
  • Also means reduced aileron authority with a smaller span, although i could compensate with a deeper control surface. Again means alteration to the design.
  • Flaperons can be retrofitted and removed simply by programming the transmitter.
  • I may add small vortex generators to the outer portion of the wing to help low speed performance - not sure of the exact effect on small model, although there is online research demonstrating benefits
  • Only plan to use once i'm fully confident of the models performance and would only start by experimenting at altitude. If it became difficult to control - no more flaperons!

Edited By Matt Storey 1 on 28/03/2019 16:06:01

For future reference, don't forget that many modern transmitters are capable of mixes to allow operation of flaps as ailerons for normal flight and as flaps when required. Very useful to copy full size glider practice where inboard flaps are sometimes coupled with ailerons via cunning mechanical mixing...

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