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David Davis13/04/2019 08:56:22
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3465 forum posts
622 photos

I have just made an inventory of my "squadron."

I have:

3 models requiring extensive repair.
1 model in the process of being built.
2 models that require a little fettling.
2 models which are built and unflown but require finishing off.

Given all of the above, I have two questions for you.

1. Why oh why, as letter-writers to the BBC used to say, why oh why have I started building the Big Guff?

2. Am I alone in this practice?

Doc Marten13/04/2019 09:03:47
387 forum posts
4 photos

1. Because you are a builder at heart.

2. You know you're not!

Personally I hold off building until the one in progress is finished, I do have models that require repair and have inherited some unfinished ones but once I start on those (If ever) I will carry on until they are finished before I go to the next or else I'll just accumulate a shed full of incomplete models!

Percy Verance13/04/2019 09:26:16
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8108 forum posts
155 photos

At the end of the day David it doesn't matter one jot how many crashed, part built or unbuilt models you have. Like you I'm in this hobby purely for the relaxation, enjoyment and satisfaction it provides.

So no, you're not alone. I have part built models I began building 20+ years ago, but what the hell. It's all part of the journey, and for me personally there are no schedules or timelines!

Carry on regardless and continue enjoying it all......... yes

Edited By Percy Verance on 13/04/2019 09:35:33

Geoff Parkes13/04/2019 09:39:40
107 forum posts

I agree probably if you are like me I pick a model to build but as I am building this project I am thinking/ looking at the next project, if for some reason you hit a snag on the current project that needs the all important thinking time, my mind starts to drift onto the unstarted project, the result of all this is it takes some time to resurect the enthusiasm to get back into the build of the first one, I find that if you can work on the first project for say a couple of days the enthusiasm soon returns.

Percy Verance13/04/2019 09:51:54
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8108 forum posts
155 photos

Exactly Geoff, it's what works for you.

A few moons ago we had a chap in our club (sadly no longer with us) whom flew only very occasionally, preferring instead to build models rather than actually fly them. For him, the creation of the model from scratch or a plan build was what floated his boat. The flying was a sort of incidental by-product which he seemed much less bothered about.

Edited By Percy Verance on 13/04/2019 09:54:03

Josip Vrandecic -Mes13/04/2019 10:15:41
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2993 forum posts
260 photos
Dear David, I understand you completely. Someone likes to build, someone fly (I'm the other one) by the way, one of the famous aircraft designers, the late Marcel Dassault, flew only once under medical conditions. They pulled him from the Nazis and then he was sleepy by sedatives ... so afraid of flying ...smile o
Cheers
Jo
Cuban813/04/2019 10:19:39
2809 forum posts
1 photos

All part of the great variety of the hobby. For me, I suppose a model is split typically 30:70 between actual construction and the flying. Building is not quite a simple means to an end for yours truly, but I always have that first flight in my mind's eye. As David Boddington once said in one of his TV appearances "the model is only good in the air". Drilling down a little further in terms of the build, for me, a similar split of say 40:60 between the actual balsa bashing and the arty bit of detailing and finish. People who just build and either don't fly the model at all, or get someone else to fly it for them do puzzle me a bit, but if that's what gives them their pleasure then that's brilliant.

Peter Christy13/04/2019 10:22:17
1618 forum posts

I am reminded of the answer given by a radio "Agony Aunt" to a worried listener, back at the dawn of local radio in the UK. It went something like this:

"....and to Worried of Tunbridge Wells, Yes, sometimes on reaching middle age, men do develop strange habits! But don't worry! Next time he does it, put the lid on quickly! At least it will stop the sugar going everywhere!"

wink

--

Pete

Derek Stevenson13/04/2019 10:43:41
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280 forum posts
4 photos

I think we are all a bit like that, people kept giving me crashed plane (or maybe I was the one willing to take them home). I got bogged down and spent far too long fixing some planes that should have ben binned. Now I've decided it's better to finish one model before going on to the next job, unless it's a quick fix from something I recently damaged. I've almost finished building a mini Tyro which came to me in 2011 I think! The thing is now I have a number of planes to maiden either new or repaired instead of multiple 95% finished ones. And then there is the stuff you buy at a swapmeet that you don't need, haven't been able to sort out that problem yet!

Edited By Derek Stevenson on 13/04/2019 10:45:15

Peter Miller13/04/2019 11:16:06
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10323 forum posts
1231 photos
10 articles

I have learned through long and bitter experience that if I leave one project to move on to another the first will NEVER be finished .

Don Fry13/04/2019 11:37:52
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4130 forum posts
48 photos

I'd have a good look at the 3 extensive damaged ones. Do you really want them? Is the only reason they still exist because you can repair them, but can't actually be bothered. If you broke them up, they would cease to bother your Khama, and your mind can return to important stuff.

End of day, blessed with the ability to build, why value the wrecks.

ken anderson.13/04/2019 11:47:16
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8477 forum posts
773 photos

fear not David, its the way most of us men work......organised chaos I call it, only us(men) understand....

ken anderson..ne...1..chaos dept.

Dwain Dibley.13/04/2019 13:12:43
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1270 forum posts
1265 photos

It's the same with your balsa scrap bin Guys, where do you draw the line at what to keep (just in case)........frown

I've even got Sawdust in mine......laugh

D.D.

Peter Miller13/04/2019 13:48:29
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10323 forum posts
1231 photos
10 articles

I sorted out my balsa scrap box a while ago, had a small bonfire.

I am now building a "new" model and making a point of using wood from the scrap box first and only cutting into a new sheet if I don't have any of the size I need.

I say "new" because I am buiding one of my old designs from the 90s again.

It is so relaxing because I don't have to think or work things out. I just build it.

David Davis13/04/2019 13:58:14
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3465 forum posts
622 photos
Posted by Don Fry on 13/04/2019 11:37:52:

I'd have a good look at the 3 extensive damaged ones. Do you really want them? Is the only reason they still exist because you can repair them, but can't actually be bothered. If you broke them up, they would cease to bother your Khama, and your mind can return to important stuff.

End of day, blessed with the ability to build, why value the wrecks.

Ah, there's a certain amount of emotional baggage attached to the wrecks.

  1. The oldest wreck is a Chris Olsen Uproar a model which I've admired for more than fifty years. The port wing snapped off in a crash. I have to decide whether I build another wing or try to repair the existing one.trying it out.jpg
  2. The second one is a WOT 4 XL which I enjoyed flying but I stalled it on landing and snapped the fuselage in half. My landings have improved since that incident! I have repaired it and fitted it with a Laser 150 V twin. The fuselage needs covering and the film on the tailplane is in a pretty sorry state so you know where this is going don't you? If I've got to cover those two components why not the wing as well and have a WOT4 XL in a unique colour scheme? That would look grand!
  3. Finally there's my long suffering Junior 60. I converted it to electric power over the winter and crashed it in the following way. I was flying my SLEC Fun Fly when the engine cut as the model was climbing. I shoved in down elevator but there was no response and the model crashed to its doom. Completely beyond economical repair. Feeling that it was necessary to get back on the horse I flew the Junior 60. It went into a spiral dive over a wood which I was using to get some lift. The cognoscenti diagnosed transmitter problems so off it went to the menders and it has been alright since. This model was my first successful radio controlled model though it's a bit like Trigger's broom! I'd like to repair it and give it to my trainee pilot, "The Man With Two Left Hands," once I've finally taught him how to fly. Please don't tell anyone thatI've crashed a Junior 60. blush.

Dwayne Dibley, if an off-cut is shorter than 4 inches or 10 cms it goes into a plastic bag below my bench. When the bag is full I use its contents to light the wood burner!

Former Member13/04/2019 14:09:24
1322 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

Paul Marsh13/04/2019 16:24:39
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3738 forum posts
1069 photos

I have around 580 models, think there are 4 that need repairing or finishing off.

They are:

VQ DH Beaver - needs a engine, 35cc petrol, ready to go once after.

Cmpro P40, needs engine fitting, 30cc four stroke and final repairs done, as bought cheap as a fixer-upper!

Mini Panic, needs sanding and recover rear fuz, got last week after club member crashed it and he didn't like the model.

Priory models Revolution. Needs finishing, covering film ran out (World Models Toughlon Ferrari Red - out of stock at Webbies) and on hold when the covering comes in.

Miles Atwood Special needs Saito 40cc engine, ready though, has all gear in otherwise

Rest are flyable and ready to go.

Andrew Ray13/04/2019 20:14:58
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719 forum posts
19 photos
Posted by Paul Marsh on 13/04/2019 16:24:39:

I have around 580 models, think there are 4 that need repairing or finishing off.

That's an air force not a collection of models!

I'm in a similar boat, I reckon I have 16 models that need time spending on them, most part built that need finishing. I am trying not to start anything new until I have these all sorted. I would love to start a project and finish it without being distracted by something else.

And from the replies above, no you are not alone...

Martin Harris13/04/2019 21:27:40
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8952 forum posts
221 photos
Posted by Andrew Ray on 13/04/2019 20:14:58:
Posted by Paul Marsh on 13/04/2019 16:24:39:

I have around 580 models, think there are 4 that need repairing or finishing off.

That's an air force not a collection of models!

Must have a very big shed!

I'm struggling to find storage for my relatively modest (not according to my wife though) collection of less than a tenth of that number!

Tim Hooper13/04/2019 21:37:30
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2863 forum posts
2363 photos
Posted by Peter Miller on 13/04/2019 11:16:06:

I have learned through long and bitter experience that if I leave one project to move on to another the first will NEVER be finished .

I'm with you, Peter.

I'm a single-task bloke, so it's strictly one project at a time.

Tim

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