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New EDF Mini Jets- Jet Provost & Folland Gnat

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Lucas Hofman29/05/2020 12:25:47
668 forum posts
375 photos

Thanks Dick.

Your experience fits with mine in that I found aileron deflection as per plan ok but the elevator response sluggish on +/- 6mm (with 30% expo). Have now changed to +/- 8, so let us see how that goes.

Lucas

Martin McIntosh29/05/2020 12:44:04
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3422 forum posts
1213 photos

Did you hand launch these yourself or get assistance and did they need much of a shove? The reason I ask is that as a mode 1 flyer I would probably only have elevator available at launch and at the moment others are not allowed to touch fellow flyer`s models.

I have the Gnat, Provost and Hunter waiting.

Glen Lewis29/05/2020 15:56:04
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11 forum posts
5 photos

I am working on the Provost (which I am converting to a CF-114 Tutor, longer nose and T tail) but have been flying my F86 Sabre a bit and quite enjoying it. I hand launch it myself but I am setup as Mode 2 on my transmitter so once I bump the left stick to full throttle on my chest my right hand can control pitch and roll while I give it a healthy throw with my left.

Steve Jones 229/05/2020 16:04:04
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581 forum posts
423 photos

Martin

I am mode 1 too.. right hand launch not an issue if kept flat and level. The normal initial dip can be controlled with elevator on left stick

Of the 3 the provost is the worst to get away and definitely needs a good shove. The gnat is the easiest and the hunter close to the gnat

steve

Martin McIntosh29/05/2020 17:56:41
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3422 forum posts
1213 photos

Thanks for that, I am not surprised that the chunky Provost is the most difficult. I would like to try the Gnat and my enlarged Hunter first.

Running out of excuses to maiden the Concorde and have booked a flying slot for Sun. when the wind forecast so far is 10-17 mph and straight down the patch. I think that this model is actually on another thread.

Stephen Belshaw02/06/2020 19:58:21
108 forum posts
27 photos

Finished the Gnat, my 3S version came out at 22ozs but I need to add some sort of battery tray so it will creep slightly over Tony's designs weight. I fitted the wing in two halves as recommended by others, the build I found very straightforward using the laser cut kit by the covering was a challenge! I also fitted two servos for the elevators as I couldn't get a satisfactory linkage with one servo. Hatch is retained by magnets but not a huge amount of grip so I may need to add another (more weight)! Not sure when I will maiden this as my usual flying space is a bit too rough and as a predominantly glider guider I think it's going to test my nerves! Anyway, here she is:

img_0265.jpeg

img_0264.jpeg

img_0263.jpeg

David Hazell 102/06/2020 22:24:59
47 forum posts

Stunning!

Lucas Hofman03/06/2020 08:39:41
668 forum posts
375 photos

Looking good!

Go for an open area for your first flights I was surprised at how quikly it becomes a small dot in the sky, and since the glide is flat you should not have to come in for landing over trees or hedges. Good luck.

Lucas

John Roberts 903/06/2020 15:08:23
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197 forum posts
175 photos

I also had a successful maiden with mine a couple of days back. Initially the model displayed pronounced 'Jeremy Corbynism' (leaning strongly to the left!) but a few correcting trim clicks soon resolved that issue.

I have left the aileron deflection at the recommended 3mm with plenty of expo (45% on Spektrum) which keeps the changes of direction smooth, flowing and twitch free. As for elevator I settled on 8mm up and 6mm down with 30% expo. Model glides nicely making landing a breeze.

Thanks to my friend and clubmate Richard for the photos.

folland gnat 33e.jpg

folland gnat 03e.jpg

folland gnat 30.jpg

Stephen Belshaw04/06/2020 05:10:39
108 forum posts
27 photos

Nice flying shots John and useful info on the control throws. Is everyone landing the Gnat dead stick?

Dickw04/06/2020 09:59:57
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723 forum posts
99 photos
Posted by Stephen Belshaw on 04/06/2020 05:10:39:

................. Is everyone landing the Gnat dead stick?

Yes and no!

I used low throttle to bring my Gnat round to final approach but shut the motor off a few feet above ground. If you have the motor running close to or on the ground you would risk sucking dirt and grass etc. through the cheat hole into that lovely fan.

It can be kept flying surprisingly slowly using low throttle.

Dick

Mike Bell04/06/2020 10:21:12
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298 forum posts
217 photos

Martin M, I have recently got to fly my Gnat and to answer your question on launch, a good, flat, firm throw is all that is needed. I am a mode 1 flyer too and have had no problems, the model stayed on track with no appreciable sink while I got my thumbs back to the sticks.

I had too much aileron movement in initially which was a mistake but when dialled down a bit it is fine. As others have noted I have found that the elevator movement can be increased over the plan recommendation. I found on a couple of occasions that pull out from a dive could be a bit too slow for comfort. CG is as per plan.

Mike

Martin McIntosh04/06/2020 12:05:52
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3422 forum posts
1213 photos

Thanks for that. I now need to pluck up courage and increase my carrot intake.

Dickw04/06/2020 23:28:07
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723 forum posts
99 photos

Two more flights with my Gnat today.

Self launching is no problem, and as others have said a good firm flat throw gets it a way nicely. I am a mode 2 flyer and launch with my right arm, so the plane is on its own until I get my hand back on the sticks, but so far that has not been a problem.

One thing I have done, which may be helpful, is to have a launch mode with both ailerons down a mm and the elevator up a couple of mm. As soon as my hand is back on the sticks I switch that off.

The other thing I noticed was that on both flights the maximum height flown was between 145m and 150m, so that seems to be my "chicken out" altitude for what is quite a small model smiley - perhaps when visibility is a bit better..........

Dick

Edited By Dickw on 04/06/2020 23:29:08

Trevor Crook05/06/2020 07:47:56
968 forum posts
69 photos

Still waiting to try my Provost. I had an unsuccessful attempt pre-lockdown when it wouldn't climb away from launch, but that was with a 25C battery. I now have a couple of 40C packs, which boost the thrust from about 450g to over 500. Haven't been able to try it yet as I don't want to self launch for a maiden, and musn't use anyone else at present.

Lucas Hofman05/06/2020 07:57:45
668 forum posts
375 photos

Trevor, I gave my launcher a pair of disposable gloves to avoid contact contamination. Keeping a distance is not a problem.

Good luck, Lucas

Steve Jones 205/06/2020 09:34:55
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581 forum posts
423 photos

Great Job John and lovely pics.. knew you would enjoy .. looks so great in the air this model . Smooth flyer too

steve

Dickw05/06/2020 11:15:48
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723 forum posts
99 photos
Posted by Trevor Crook on 05/06/2020 07:47:56:

Still waiting to try my Provost. I had an unsuccessful attempt pre-lockdown when it wouldn't climb away from launch, but that was with a 25C battery. I now have a couple of 40C packs, which boost the thrust from about 450g to over 500. Haven't been able to try it yet as I don't want to self launch for a maiden, and musn't use anyone else at present.

If you can warm up the packs before flying - e.g. on the car dashboard under the windscreen on a sunny day for an hour - that should noticeably increase thrust. I usually heat my battery packs to about 35 degrees C for certain competition flying and it really does make a measureable difference.

Dick

ken anderson.05/06/2020 14:32:12
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8686 forum posts
808 photos

hello dick...I've been using lipos for a long time now c/w all the advice about storage etc,and have never come across any saying put them" on the car dashboard under the windscreen on a sunny day for an hour"!...not been funny or telling you whats right/wrong...... but I would have thought that would have been the recipe for an accident-hope i'm wrong...

ken anderson...ne...1.......right/wrong dept.

Dickw05/06/2020 15:14:57
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723 forum posts
99 photos

Hi Ken

I actually use a thermosticaly controlled heater box to heat my Lipos to around 35 degrees C in a controlled way, but I have observed others at competitions using the "car dashboard" method instead without any problems.

I think Lipos are safe up to about 45 degrees C while charging, and 60 degrees C just sitting there.

After a flight I put them straight back in the heater box and back on charge ready for the next flight, and have been doing this for about 10 years.

I don't think any of this is good for long battery life, but if you need a bit more power for a competition or getting a difficult model in the air, a bit of heat makes a big difference.

Dick

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