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Mark Gannon13/06/2019 10:28:57
12 forum posts

Hiya sll

I'm Mark.

Ive just joined the forum.

Don Fry13/06/2019 12:34:10
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4054 forum posts
47 photos

G'day Mark

Doc Marten13/06/2019 12:38:02
378 forum posts
4 photos

Hi Mark,

What's your modelling background and interests?

Mark Gannon13/06/2019 12:47:06
12 forum posts
Posted by Doc Marten on 13/06/2019 12:38:02:

Hi Mark,

What's your modelling background and interests?

I learned to fly RC on a Seagull Arising Star IC, but I really want to build traditional balsa and ply models. Im practicing at the moment, Lol. I've just built a rubber powered balsa and tissue model. My next project is to convert a 440mm wing span rubber powered West Wings model into 3 chanel with an electric motor.

My ultimate aim is to build a large scale WWI scout.

Mark Gannon13/06/2019 12:50:13
12 forum posts
Posted by Don Fry on 13/06/2019 12:34:10:

G'day Mark

Cheers Don

Doc Marten13/06/2019 13:05:51
378 forum posts
4 photos

Excellent, another traditional builder, you prefer electric or IC?

Mark Gannon13/06/2019 13:15:10
12 forum posts
Posted by Doc Marten on 13/06/2019 13:05:51:

Excellent, another traditional builder, you prefer electric or IC?

Good question.

I love the noise, smell and tinkering with IC. I'm only going electric on my current project due to weigh and space issues.

kc13/06/2019 19:02:58
6056 forum posts
169 photos

You will probably find building and modifying a 440mm span rubber model to RC is much more difficult than building an established IC model of about 52 inch span. For example beefing up the rubber model structure to take the extra weight of motor & lipo without increasing weight too much will need some experience or advice. On the contrary numerous IC model to existing designs ( for example Peter Millers plans) will have build threads here on Modelflying and somebody else will have solved all the problems first. And you can be sure the model will fly well when finished. So consider a sports model of medium size that will help your flying progress too - maybe the Peter Miller Ballerina design. Peter is often here on the forum to advise too. Or the rather similar Hanger Monkey from a different designer a year or two ago.

But of course the trick is to build a model you need and desire but not a scale one that is too complex and takes for ever to finish.

Edited By kc on 13/06/2019 19:04:45

Josip Vrandecic -Mes13/06/2019 21:44:45
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2993 forum posts
260 photos

Welcome Mark , here you will be comfortable and ,also, you have my support from abroad .face 1

Jo

Edited By Josip Vrandecic -Mes on 13/06/2019 21:45:19

kevin b13/06/2019 21:57:41
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1670 forum posts
134 photos

Hi Mark.

I can see your train of thought, re the rubber powered kit build and then convert another that you are familiar with the construction.

If I may suggest, you might be better advised to scale up slightly, even if building space is currently at a premium. Converting small models to electric is an art in itself and requires significant expenditure on miniature equipment. If you were to build slightly larger model, say 600 - 800mm span, then you would find it easier to work on and fly. You could also source cheaper components, that aren't as critical on weight.

Have a look at some of the kits on here. **LINK**

If you want to convert a kit to electric power, then trawl through the build logs on the various websites (and YouTube). There is plenty of information out there to help you, as well as all the advice you can get on here.

At this stage building from a kit is probably your best bet. Once you are familiar with the type of construction it will be a slightly smaller step to building from a plan.

Kevin b

Mark Gannon13/06/2019 22:11:02
12 forum posts

Thanks for the advice guys. It's most welcome

My original think was to start small and simple as I didn't want to bite off more than I could chew.

I've only built and flown .40 size ARTF's

I've built a rubber powered balsa and tissue model and that turned out way better than I expected.

I like the look of the Flair Attila, but I don't know if my building skill level is at that point yet.

I don't want to end up with an unfinished project languishing in my garage for eternity

john stones 113/06/2019 22:16:21
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10707 forum posts
1480 photos

Flair Atilla is a pretty good kit, you'll be o.k with it Mark. smiley

kevin b13/06/2019 22:19:44
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1670 forum posts
134 photos

PM sent.

Mark Gannon13/06/2019 22:26:15
12 forum posts
Posted by kevin b on 13/06/2019 21:57:41:

Hi Mark.

I can see your train of thought, re the rubber powered kit build and then convert another that you are familiar with the construction.

If I may suggest, you might be better advised to scale up slightly, even if building space is currently at a premium. Converting small models to electric is an art in itself and requires significant expenditure on miniature equipment. If you were to build slightly larger model, say 600 - 800mm span, then you would find it easier to work on and fly. You could also source cheaper components, that aren't as critical on weight.

Have a look at some of the kits on here. **LINK**

If you want to convert a kit to electric power, then trawl through the build logs on the various websites (and YouTube). There is plenty of information out there to help you, as well as all the advice you can get on here.

At this stage building from a kit is probably your best bet. Once you are familiar with the type of construction it will be a slightly smaller step to building from a plan.

Kevin b

Hiya Kevin.

I looked at the link you posted and I quite like the look of the Silver Lady, a 30 inch (762mm) 3 chanel they have there. It looks pretty straight forward judging by the pic

kevin b13/06/2019 22:30:25
avatar
1670 forum posts
134 photos

Most of these old plans are available from the download sites.

You can have a look at the plan and then decide if you want (need) to buy the kit.

**LINK**

Mark Gannon13/06/2019 22:39:16
12 forum posts
Posted by kevin b on 13/06/2019 22:30:25:

Most of these old plans are available from the download sites.

You can have a look at the plan and then decide if you want (need) to buy the kit.

**LINK**

To be honest the silver lady looks easier to build than the rubber powered kit I built. That's suprised me!

kc14/06/2019 10:49:53
6056 forum posts
169 photos

I see that the Silver Lady does not have the formers shown on the plan..... so it's necessary to work those out for yourself ( see note on the website) Not ideal.

One of the things about buying a kit is the wood choice is already made and hopefully is suitable. This is one of the features of building from scratch - balsa is such a variable material that selecting the right grade for the job is key. A matter of experience really.

Starting building with a well established kit like Wot4, SLEC FunFly or Limbo Dancer will be worthwhile and will produce the kind of model that helps progress in flying and also a basic model for engine testing or all weather flying in future.

Another consideration is power unit and building models that will all take the same engine or use the same size Lipos. As one needs 3 or 4 or more Lipos to have a decent flying session without recharging it's helpful to have several models that can use the same type. So many of us standardise on 3S2200 or 4S 3000/4500 to help minimise battery types/cost. Same with glow motors - a .40 or .46 two stroke will be useful in many models, same with .25 etc, etc.

ken anderson.14/06/2019 11:09:27
avatar
8452 forum posts
773 photos

welcome mark...

ken anderson...ne...1...welcome dept.

Mark Gannon14/06/2019 12:09:01
12 forum posts
Posted by kc on 14/06/2019 10:49:53:

I see that the Silver Lady does not have the formers shown on the plan..... so it's necessary to work those out for yourself ( see note on the website) Not ideal.

One of the things about buying a kit is the wood choice is already made and hopefully is suitable. This is one of the features of building from scratch - balsa is such a variable material that selecting the right grade for the job is key. A matter of experience really.

Starting building with a well established kit like Wot4, SLEC FunFly or Limbo Dancer will be worthwhile and will produce the kind of model that helps progress in flying and also a basic model for engine testing or all weather flying in future.

Another consideration is power unit and building models that will all take the same engine or use the same size Lipos. As one needs 3 or 4 or more Lipos to have a decent flying session without recharging it's helpful to have several models that can use the same type. So many of us standardise on 3S2200 or 4S 3000/4500 to help minimise battery types/cost. Same with glow motors - a .40 or .46 two stroke will be useful in many models, same with .25 etc, etc.

Thanks for the advice.

I was going to go electric because of availability issues with 2 stroke glow engines. I have a .46 Irvine in my trainer, but they don't make those anymore and electric us cheaper than going with a 4 stroke engine.

Mark Gannon14/06/2019 12:09:28
12 forum posts
Posted by ken anderson. on 14/06/2019 11:09:27:

welcome mark...

ken anderson...ne...1...welcome dept.

Thanks Ken

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